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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 







!RaAIH(gD9(§® 



ND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



m 



ARCH 



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• 




1943 



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CHIEF OF POLICE CHARLES W. DULLEA 
Completes Three Years as Head of San Francisco Police Department 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1943 



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CYPRESS LAWN 
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Colma, California 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CLARA BURNHAM 



Telephone Fillmore 9835 



HORSESHOE TAVERN 



2024 CHESTNUT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

MUST BE MADE 

TO LAST 



The new year will find nearly all 
of us giving better care than ever 
before to our electric appliances. 
They must be made to last. Few, if 
any, new appliances will be avail- 
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March, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Directory 



Pagel 



Featured in This Issue 



Page 

Chief Dullea in Office Three Wars .... 3 
By Ofiie L. Warner 



Officer Timothy Ryan Killed 4 



Mayor Rossi Praises School Patrol 



Commissioner McGovern 
Again Heads Police Board 
By Opic L. Warner 



20 Years Service Record of Chief Nicholson 



Training S. F. Police to Shoot 



Peace Officers' Association 



10 



S. F. Auxiliary Police 12 



Commissioner Walkup Hurt in Auto Accident . 13 



Marin County Peace Officers' Association . . 13 



No. California Police Communication Officers . 15 



Inspector Frank Brown Passes On 



1 be Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 
Traffic Bureau Albert S. Munn 635 Washington St. 

Residence - 226 Jules Avenue 
Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 

Director 

Bur. of Personnel Lieut. George Healy Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 

City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 

Central Capt. M. E. Mitchell .635 Washington St. 

Residence- 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence - 438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan.. Drumm & Comm'I Sts. 

Residence -WIS 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 

Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 

Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence -2533 18th Avenue 

Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 

Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey ......2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



men in Trouble Call SUtter 20-20 

When in DOUbt Alway.AtYourServ.ee 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOl/RNAL 



March, 1943 



Pho 



UNderhill 0800 



Residence: Mission 7261 Phone HEmlock 9144 



M. MOLENOS. S. C1USTI. V. AIELLO 



PIONEER PIPE CO. 



THREE PAL'S CAFE 



F. C. LUNDBERG 

Reconditioned and New Pipe Casing, Valves and Fittings 

634 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Lunches — Dinners — Fine Wines and Liquors 

Next to Home It Is the Best Place to Eat 

3 15 1 17th ST. (Bet. Sd. Van Ness & Folsom), SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone KLondike 2-1343 



FREE AND PROMPT DELIVERY Telephone ATwater 3 13 1 



PETER J. BARICH. Proprietor 



NOD-LAY MARKET 

Groceries — Fruits — Vegetables — Wines — Liquors 

"Quality and Service at Low Prices" 

3615 EIGHTEENTH ST.. (Bet. Guerrero & Dolores). San Francisco 
Phone UNderhill 9046 LAURA and BILLY WELCH 

MIAMI BUFFET 

SEVENTEENTH at FLORIDA STS. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

GREETINGS FROM 

HOTEL PALOMAR 



364 OFARRELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 



CLEVELAND WRECKING CO. 



BUILDING RECORDS 



2600 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone ATwater 13 72 WE DELIVER TWICE A DAY 

SUPREME Ravioli 8C Tagliarini Factory 

DEPARTMENT OF NEW MISSION MARKET 
Fresh Mushroom Gravy — Domestic and Imported Groceries 

3220 TWENTY-SECOND ST.. (Near Mission) SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone ORd^ay 7277 



MRS. E. A. MAYER. Owner-Mgr. 



THE RITZ HOTEL 



EDDY and TAYLOR STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ALBERT PICARD 



Telephone VAlencia 9400 



V. CERRUT! 



GOLDEN EAGLE WINE & LIQUOR CO. 

Wholesale Wfnes, Beer and Liquors — Price, Service, Quality 
5122 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone VAlenci3 752 3 



EVELYN WOLFF. Proprietor 



EVELYN'S RESTAURANT 



Breakfast — Lunch ■ 
2520 THIRD STREET 



Dinner - 



Beer — Wines — Liquors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Tel phone MArket 2772 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

ENGINEERS and MACHINISTS 
934-944 BRANNAN ST.. (Bet. 8th & 9th), SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of a Friend 



Telephone GArfield 9620 



CALIFANO BROS. 



NAPOLI MARKET 

Imported and Domestic Groceries, Poultry, Fruits and Vegetables 

1756 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone Mission 705 2 



GOLDEN CITY CLEANER 



5 177 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



BROWN CREAMERY 



2887 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



POTRERO MARKET 

Groceries — Fruits and Vegetables — Choice Meats — Wines and Beer 
600 VERMONT ST.. (Cor. 18th St.) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone HEmlock 5567 

GRANZ 8C ERMANN 

FURNITURE and UPHOLSTERY 

228 FILLMORE STREET (Near Haight) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

PAGE'S CLUB 

GORDON W. PAGE 

"Where Old Friends Meet" 

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Quickest Reducing Method in San Francisco. Our Paraffin Baths 
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GRAY'S CONTOUR SHOPPE 



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OCCIDENTAL PLATING WORKS, INC. 

Alumilite Process, Chromium Plating, Polishing, Oxidizing, Spraying 

2259 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone ORdway 2703 CORCORAN JEL1NSKI 

TELEGRAPH PRESS— Publishers of 

DAILY RACING NEWS 



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SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



N L G ASS'N. 



WM. H. HILLEBRANDT 

Groceries — Delicatessen — Liquors and Wines 

400 FILLMORE STREET. (Cor. Paige). SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



WILLIAMS-WALLACE CO. 

160 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

SCAVENGER'S LUNCH 



1624 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

DE SOTO SEDAN SERVICE 

GRAND HOTEL 



Telephone VAlencia 6804 



T. & J. FREITAS 



MOTOR ARMS GARAGE 



3620 NINETEENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone UNderhill 93 10 

CIRCLE CLUB 

CLAY CHIPPS — JIM HUNT 
3901 EIGHTEENTH STREET (Cor. Sanchez) SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone ATwater 5039 



THE VERY BEST OF EVERYTHING 



RAMONA CAKE SHOP 

Our Motto: "Not How Cheap But How Good" 
2649 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 19221 



: San Francisco 




~Ǥ PEACE OFFICERS' 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

1 Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XX 



MARCH, 1943 



No. 12 



Chief Dullea in Office Three Years 



February 15 Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea com- 
pleted three years as head of the San Francisco Police 
Department, and during that period of time he has 
achieved a record of success that any man might well be 
proud, and during which the San Francisco Police De- 
partment has maintained its reputation of being one of 
the world's best. 

As this city's war chief he has proven his ability as an 
executive and planner. Months before war actually broke 
out he was conscious that the United States could not 
miss being involved, and therefore he realized that San 
Francisco would be a danger zone that must be given the 
utmost in protection and civilian defense. He was one of 
the first of the state peace officers, assembled by Governor 
Earl Warren, then attorney general, in the first part of 
1940 to devise plans for a state-wide system of defense of 
every important point in California. 

Chief Dullea was given an important part in the pro- 
gram as it affected the Bay Region, and made an intensive 
study of what the European countries at war had done to 
meet the demands for protection of their respective popula- 
tions. He conferred with every authority on just what 
should be done for his native city and came up with some 
sound ideas of his own. Months before the war broke out 
he had, working with Mayor Angelo J. Rossi and the 
Civilian Defense Board, made every provision for any 
attack on the city. 

He conferred with Federal officials and was called back 
to Washington to give information relative to th's city 
which is the main point of embarkation and of vast im- 
portance in the movement of warriors and supplies. 

He gave the utmost in cooperation with other peace 
officers of this area and he marshalled all his own Depart- 
ment and saw they were properly equipped with instruc- 
tions as to just what to do in any emergency. 

For a time he was director of Civilian Defense but 
after directing the preliminary work of organization he 
stepped aside for Director Jack Helms. 

One of the first big undertakings Chief Dullea under- 
took at the start of the war was to organize the air raid 
warden service and so well has this been done that today 
every block is properly covered by intelligent men with a 
block leader who knows what to do when the air raid 



sirens start their alarms, as well as what to do if bombs 
are dropped on the city. 

Then realizing that 1300 policemen were not adequate 
in case of an attack on our city by the enemy, he formed 
the auxiliary police and today this body is one that is ready 
to render every help to the regular police force. The men 
of the Auxiliary Police have devoted many hours to train- 
ing and without pay, and they have manifested a spirit of 
patriotism that has been remarkable. Deputy Chief 
Michael Riordan had charge of preparing this unit of our 
local defense, assisted by army officers. 

When bombs fall it is necessary that there be some one 
on hand who knows what to do with unexploded bombs, 
so Chief Dullea took the proper steps to see that we had 
a bomb demolition detail. Captain of Inspectors Bernard 
McDonald was assigned to the task of organizing mem- 
bers of the Department and training them in every phase 
of this dangerous work. Today each police district has 
plenty of men who can step out and take the proper steps 
to render harmless bombs of every type from the incen- 
diaries to the four ton block busters. 

And while Chief Dullea has overlooked nothing to give 
the utmost in war protection he has not slowed up in 
keeping San Francisco free from crime. The records will 
show that during the past year murders, robberies, burg- 
laries and other so-called major crimes have decreased in 
spite of the increases population brought about by the 
great influx of defense workers and members of the armed 
forces. 

He has been called upon by the national government for 
advice and assistance and he has given of his long ex- 
perience as a police officer much valuable information, and 
has received high commendation from high government 
officials for service and cooperation rendered during the 
past 12 months. 

With prospects brighter for 1943 in the war picture 
Chief Dullea is not relaxing, and he is keeping every 
branch under his charge having to do wi'h the security of 
San Francisco and its people fully organized and ready to 
face any situation at a moment's notice. 

Chief Dullea during the year has taken the time to see 
that improvements necessary to keep the Police Depart- 
( Continued on Page 15) 



Page I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1<M3 



Officer Timothy Ryan Killed 



Another tragedy visited the San Francisco Police 
Department this month, when a beserk ex-husband, with- 
out warning and without giving a chance, sent a fusillade 
of bullets from a rifle into the body of Officer Timothy 
Ryan, killing him almost instantly. Officer Ryan had 




Officer Timothy Ryan 

been sent to the home of Glenn L. Warner, a drink- 
crazed plumber who was beating; up his forrrer wife, 
whose home he had invaded. As the veteran officer, he 
having joined the Department in 1929, entered the door 
of Mrs. Lee's apartment Warner, who had the gun in 
his hand, let go and Ryan fell, mortally wounded. 

The alarm was sent out by neighbors who heard the 
shooting and radio cars loaded with policemen surrounded 
the house. Inspector David Brady and Ray Hunt with 
Officer John Riewerts took over the job of taking Warner. 
As this trio started through the door they were met with 
another outburst from the plumber's rifle and one bullet 
narrowly missed Hunt, whose coat was given a bullet 
hole. The officers, who had drawn their guns, returned 
the fire and Warner was shot down. 

A search of Warner's effects revealed other guns and 
the 52-year-old murderer evidently had a shooting com- 
plex. 

I he dead officer was one of those policemen who 
went about his duties as a police officer in an unobtrusive 
manner, rendering efficient service, taking seriously the 



responsibilities of his calling. He was well liked by his 
neighbors and the people who lived along the beats be 
had walked, and was highly esteemed by his fellow- 
officers. 

He was wrapped up in his family, consisting of his wife 
and two children. A third child is expected. 

Nearly 200 fellow officers, led by Mayor Rossi, Police 
Commissioners Walter McGovern, Ward G. Walkup 
and William P. Wobber, Chief Dullea, and Deputy Chief 
Michael Riordan, attended the services, as an honor escort 
at St. Anne's church and Dugan's Undertaking Parlor, 
and an honory escort accompanied the remains to Holy 
Cross Cemetery. An honor guard of fellow officers stood 
at the casket until the hour of the services. Six officers 
with whom he worked acted as pall bearers. 

Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald announced 
he would recommend meritorious service for Inspectors 
Brady and Hunt and Officer Riewerts. These members 
of the Department were personally commended by Chief 
Dullea for their courageous action in the face of mur- 
derous fire. 

It happens all too often that brave men must be sac- 
rificed in the line of duty in such instances as this latest 
tragedy. There is not a patrolman in the Department 
who is not continually called upon to settle some family 
squabble, and they usually escape without any deadly 
assault, so much that they hesitate to approach one 
without drawn guns and ready to shoot it out. However, it 
seems that in view of the fact that there have been sev- 
eral members lost under just such circumstances that cost 
the life of brave Officer Ryan, that policemen should 
take more precautions in handling these cases, even if 
they may face the displeasure of citizens who feel they 
are exceeding their authority by having a gun in hand 
when they come to settle some quarrel between a hus- 
band and wife. A little ridicule is much more desirable 
than a lot of tears and sorrow. 



THREE STOLEN CARS ON ONE TRIP 

Recently Inspector William Gilmore in charge of the 
San Francisco Auto Theft Bureau and Inspector Clifford 
Dunleavy were on their way to Redwood City to pick 
up a stolen car and return the same to this city. As they 
drove along they kept a lookout on the cars they saw- 
parked along the highway, and this observance paid 
dividends. This side of Belmont they spotted a car along 
the side of the highway that proved after a check of 
missing cars to have been one stolen the night before in 
San Francisco. Then two miles farther, near San Carlos, 
they saw another that had the numbers of one reported 
stolen. The hoys were able to get no farther than some 
25 miles when they ran out of gasoline. 

In Redwood City thev brought back an armv de- 
serter who had been picked up by some of Chief C. L. 
Collin's men driving through that city. 



March, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



age . 



Mayor Rossi Praises School Patrol 



The following letter from Mayor Angelo J. Rossi has 
been delivered to Chief Charles W. Dullea and calls at- 
tention to the fine work of a unit of the San Francisco 
Police Department that more people should know about: 




Inspector Byron J. Getchell 

The recent nationwide program for the conservation of 
manpower through the reduction of accidents on the home 
front has caused every city official to take stock of the 
safety activities of his community. I cannot let this oppor- 
tunity pass without first expressing my appreciation for 
the splendid work being done by the Traffic Bureau of 
the Police Department. In addition, I cannot find words 
sufficiently impressive to compliment the various School 
Safety Patrols of this city and the record made by the 
young men in these patrols while supplementing the work 
of the Traffic Bureau. Every San Franciscan is justly 
proud of the outstanding achievements of these young 
students in the schools of our city. 

As well as protecting children from the hazards of 
traffic at street crossings in the vicinity of schools, it has 
developed initiative and responsibility in all those who have 
participated and has been a splendid builder of those 
qualities of citizenship which now, more than ever, are 
necessary to the public welfare. Today, this opportunity 
for community service is translated into a real contribu- 
tion in behalf of the Nation's war effort. 

Because of the outstanding safety record established 
by the School Safety Patrols of this city, and because of 
the increased importance of safety as recognized by the 
Federal Government, I want to take this opportunity to 
commend those who have been most responsible for the 
work of the Patrols. 

To you, as Chief of the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, I wish to express my gratitude and the gratitude of 
all San Franciscans for the outstanding work which the 



Police Department has done in this field. Much of the 
credit for the fine work of the School Safety Patrol is due 
to Inspector Byron J. Getchell, who has had active charge 
of the Patrols of this city for the past sixteen years, during 
which time not one single school child has been seriously 
injured or killed at any school crossing where the Patrols 
have been on duty. 

All schools in San Francisco, both public and parochial, 
have active Safety Patrols and it goes without saying, of 
course, that the interest and effort put into this activity 
by the Patrol members reflect the intelligent direction of 
the school authorities who have given the Patrols such 
wholehearted support. 

Credit for the accomplishments of the Patrol must 
also be given to the Congress of Parents and Teachers, the 
Mothers' Clubs, and the California State Automobile 
Association, all of which have been active as cooperating 
agencies. Public acceptance of the fine work of the Patrols 
is the best evidence that the value of this activity is widely 
and generously recognized. 

My congratulations to all those who have been respon- 
sible for a good job well done. I am sure that the good 
work will continue. 

Yours sincerely, 

Angelo J. Rossr. 
Mayor 



GARAGES WARNED TO 

BEWARE NEW LIQUOR RACKET 

Garage men are warned to beware of a new racket in 
which a man dressed as a "war worker" defrauds garage 
operators in fake liquor deals. 

The Better Business Bureau said it has the police look- 
ing for a man who drives up to garages in a damaged 
automobile and, while getting estimates for repairs, con- 
fides in mechanics that he can get "well known brands of 
Scotch whisky at $4.50 a case." 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

JOE'S POOL PARLOR 

SAN BRUNO. CALIFORNIA 



Telephone South San Francisco 1474 



GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 



MR. and MRS. REICHEL 
Board and Room 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone DElaware 1103 

J. DeMARTINI 8C SONS 

NURSERY 
HILLSIDE BOULEVARD COLMA. CALIFORNIA 




MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone MArket 7670 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1<U3 



.ommissioner 



McGovern Again Heads Police Board 



When the present Board of Police Commissioners 
was organized three years ago, Commissioner Walter 
McGovern advanced the theory that the city charter, in 
effect, provided that the office of president of the respec- 
tive municipal boards should be rotated. It was his idea 
that by doing this it would serve to prevent one man 




Attorney Walter McGovern 
President, Board of Police Commissioners 

dominating such a board, and give such commission mem- 
bers equal interests and responsibilities. 

So when he was elected president in February 1941 he 
announced he would like his fellow commissioners Wil- 
liam P. Wobber and Ward G. Walkup to join in estab- 
lishing a precedent in the Police Department of having 
a new president each year. This was agreed upon, and 
when Commissioner McGovern completed his first annual 
term Commissioner Wobber was elected to preside, and 
he in turn gave way at the end of his year to Commissioner 
Walkup. 

Commissioner Walkup this month completed his annual 
chairmanship of the Commission and Commissioner Mc- 
Govern was again elevated to the presidency. 

The idea has worked out admirably. As each member 
took over he found the chairmanship entailed more respon- 
sibilities and these responsibilities have been well carried 
out by Commissioners Wobber and Walkup. 

In assuming the post for the second time since he has 
been on the Board, President McGovern can look back 
and appreciate the soundness of this innovation of rotating 
the presidential position of the Board, which he fostered, 
and which is being followed by some other Boards of the 
City Government. 

President McGovern, one of the state's leading at- 
toreys-at-law, despite the large civil law practice he enjoys, 
has given to his position as Police Commissioner outstand- 



ing service. Though the position pays but small salary, he 
nevertheless has used it as an opportunity of contributing 
his part to the civic betterment of the city in which he 
was born, reared and became a successful practitioner 
of the law. 

He introduced many changes in the Police Depart- 
ment that have materially aided in making that organiza- 
tion of law enforcement one of the best in the country. 
When he was appointed to the Commission in January 
1939 by Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, he brought with him 
a comprehensive knowledge of our department gathered 
through many important criminal trials at the Hall of 
Justice. One of his first announcements and one he was 
unable to put into effect until 1941 was that the Chief 
of Police should be the actual head of the Police Depart- 
ment, and that as a police officer he should have the 
running of the Department, and that the Commissioners 
should let the Chief have a full hand in its conduct. 

With this in mind he declared that Charles Dullea, 
then Captain of Inspectors, was the man who could assume 
such full powers, and when William P. Wobber was 
appointed on the Board he succeeded in placing Captain 
Dullea at the head of the Police Department, and nothing 
that official has done since has given cause to President 
McGovern or his fellow members to regret this act. 

Another innovation sponsored by President McGovern 
was that members of the Commission should participate 
in as many activities of the Police Department as possible, 
not confining themselves to the weekly meetings. Thus 
we see him with Commissioners Wobber and Walkup at 
graduating exercises of the Police Academy ; annual meet- 
ings of the Traffic Pistol Club; at gatherings where a 
police officer is being honored on his retirement or for 
some outstanding police work, at the annual Police 
Widows' and Orphans' Concert and Ball; and other 
functions aside from the performance of police work. The 
three are nearly always present at the monthly meetings 
of the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association. 

Through the past three years there has been the most 
harmonious spirit between the three Commissioners, each 
being bent upon one principle only, that of making the 
Police Department a potent agency against criminal activ- 
ities of every manner. 

President McGovern, as we stated before, was born 
and reared in San Francisco. He was born on Rincon 
Hill back in 1886. Determined to be a lawyer, he shaped 
his education toward that end and barely after reaching 
his majority was admitted to practice in this state. He 
has participated in some of the leading criminal and civil 
cases of this city during upward of the past 30 years and 
is one of California's outstanding trial lawyers. 

In 1918 and 1919 he was an assistant district attorney. 

A deep student of government and having displayed 

his capabilities along this line on numerous occasions, he 

was prevailed upon in 1934 to enter the race for State 

Senator from this county. He was elected with a vote 



March. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page! 



of 171,000 votes, the largest ever cast for a candidate for 
that office, before or since. 

As a member of the Legislature he soon became recog- 
nized as a man who knew his way around. He introduced 
legislation to curb illegal lobbying, was a member of 
the powerful Senate Committee on Municipal Corpora- 
tion Government and was also a member of the Judiciary 
Committee, writing some of the important laws found 
on our statutes today. 



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M. A 1 



William P. Wobber, Sr. 
Vice President Police Commissioners 

He refused to run for a second term after he had served 
his four years as a member of the State Senate. 

With such a background of professional and public 
service it was logical that Mayor Rossi should select him 
for appointment on the Police Commission, and it is but 
natural that he has served so well, eliminating politics 
from the Police Department and providing it with a Chief 
that has been indeed the real head, and who has been 
permitted without interference to conduct the affairs of 
the Department. 

President McGovern has great faith in the men who 
make up the San Francisco Police Department and he is 
in full accord with those good citizens who maintain we 
have the finest in the land. He will tell you the records 
amply reveal how crime is kept at a minimum, how the 
Department has given fullest cooperation with federal 
agencies during this war period, and how we are one of 
the best prepared cities in civilian defense in the United 
States. 

Some of the leading accomplishments of the past three 
years under the present Commission set-up are the pro- 
vision for the police pistol range on city-owned property 
on the shores of Lake Merced, which is nearing com- 
pletion ; the provision that members of the Department 
are no longer required to pay for their ammunition used 
in perfecting their marksmanship; the development of the 
Police Academy to the high place it occupies today and 
which prepares new members in every fundamental of 



their new calling; the practice of letting policemen run 
the Department instead of those politically-minded ; the 
installation of two-way radio and equipping the local 
station with the most modern of equipment ; change in 
police rules whereby ten or more members may appear and 
present matters of general police welfare to the Commis- 
sion for action, something never before heard of in this 
city, and best of all the philosophy, based upon common 
usage and established by the law of the land, that the 
theory applied to the ordinary citizen that he is innocent 
until he is proven guilty of an offense is equally applicable 
to Police Officers. 

The San Francisco Police Department has completed 
a splendid three-year record in which the Board of Police 
Commissioners should be given equal credit with each 
and every man of the Department. 



TRAINING S. F. POLICE TO SHOOT 

( Continued from Page 9) 

ammunition, which is the best way for a beginner to 
further his shooting ability. On the second day at th? 
range, the men are required to shoot at the various targets 
to qualify as to their proficiency. 

The regular course of routine as laid down by the 
instructors is as follows: 

25 yards — Slow fire, bulls-eye target, five minutes for 
10 shots. 

25 yards — Time fire, 10 shots in 50 seconds, silhouette 
target, with K zones scoring. 

25 yards — Rapid fire, 10 shots in 30 seconds, silhouette 
target, with hits counting. 

25 yards — Bobbing stages of fire, 10 shots with four 
seconds allowed for each shot on command, hits counting. 

The last stages of fire is the walking course. The shooter 
starts on the 50-yard line with gun and holster, hands 
to his side, and starts walking toward the target on the 
command "start." Five seconds later command "fire" is 
given, the officer stopping with right foot forward, draw- 
ing revolver from holster, and is given four seconds to 
fire one shot, then another command "start" is given, 
and he again goes through the same procedure. His last 
shot would be about 15 yards from the target. This type 
of firing is recommended, as it teaches an officer to stop at 
all times before firing to prevent him from shoo ing wild. 

For one who has not done any shooting in the past 15 
years, I was agreeably surprised to learn that I headed the 
list in my group with a "290" out of a possible "300." 
It brought back recollections of pleasant days spent with 
the Police and Rifle Team in competition with other 
teams. 

It was forty years ago that I happened to be high point 
man in a revolver match we won from the Washington, 
D. C, Police Team. I mention this to show that I have 
been handling firearms for main years and all the more 
can appreciate the job allocated to Armorer Emile Dutil 
and bis assistants. It is a job well done and this Depart- 
ment, I know, is appreciative of th:- results being obtained. 



Page S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 194.] 



20 Years Service Record of Chief Nicholson 



By Judge Johx R. Flor of Larks/wr 



Chief William V. Nicholson on January 11, 1943, 
completed 20 years as Chief of the Larkspur Police 
Department. In point of service he is the dean of Police 
Chiefs in Marin County and is one of the few police 
chiefs of the Bay area who has served continuously for 
a score of years. 




Chief William V. Nicholson 

During his tenure of office Chief Nicholson has truly 
hecome an institution, and his efficiency, combined with 
his great human heart, has endeared him to every law- 
respecting resident of the city he has served so well as well 
as to all other Marin citizens. He is looked upon by all as 
more than a Police Chief and is called upon by many 
seeking comfort when they are in distress. 

Since coming to Larkspur, one of the most picturesque 
interurban cities of the Bay region, Chief Nicholson has 
made an enviable record and has built up to a high degree 
of competency the Larkspur Police Department. Through 
his unceasing activity he has won the confidence of not 
only the people of Larkspur, but of thousands of people 
of Marin County ; he has been admired for his frank- 
ness, and on many occasions has interceded in court on 
behalf of defendants by asking that leniency be shown. In 
this respect he has shown himself to be possessed of a 
heart of gold. 

As a member of the Marin County Peace Officers' 
Association he has been especially active and is given great 
credit for the success of that organization in law enforce- 



ment. He has been elected president for the year 1943 
of the organization. 

On January 11, at a meeting of the Association, held 
at San Quentin, with Warden Clinton Duffy acting as 
host, the Auxiliary Police Department presented Chief 
Nicholson with a beautiful gold star in recognition and in 
honor of his twenty years' tenure of office. At this meeting 
there were seventy members, including guests, and the 
entire audience gave Chief Nicholson a long ovation. 

After the gold star had been presented to Chief Nichol- 
son, Warden Clinton Duffy, who is First Vice President 
of the Marin County Peace Officers' Association, pre- 
sented Chief Nicholson with a beautifully designed scroll 
which everyone present signed, and written upon this 
scroll was the following tribute: 

"In honor of Chief Wm. V. Nicholson, Chief of 
Police, Larkspur, Marin County, California. 

"We, the Marin County Peace Officers' Association, 
take great pleasure in extending this tribute to our honor- 
able brother and fellow member, the oldest ranking Chief 
of Police of Marin County, veteran of over twenty years' 
active service, whose sense of duty combined with good 
judgment and fairness to all has made him a worthy citi- 
zen and a fearless and respected officer of the law. 

"We all join in wishing Chief Nicholson many more 
years of success, happiness and good health. 

"Marin County Peace Officers' Association, meeting at 
San Quentin this 1 1th day of January, 1943. 

"Twenty years of active service 

"Twenty years of faithful performance 

"Twenty years of fair dealing" 

"Twenty years for the good of the community." 

After the presentation of this scrol} the speaker called 
upon Assistant Chief of Police of Larkspur Howard 
Clark to make a rew remarks, whereupon he stated as 
follows: 

"Chief of Police Nicholson has always been found to 
be a very conscientious, industrious and kind Police Chief. 
He has made a great many sacrifices and afforded a great 
deal of comfort for all those in distress. In dealing with 
the police force he has shown himself to be a real man's 
friend and has worked incessantly for the benefit of the 
members of the police auxiliary and the police organiza- 
tion. The members of the Larkspur Police Auxiliary ad- 
mire the Chief and are very fond of him. It is my hope 
that while acting as Assistant Chief of Police of the City 
of Larkspur that I can accomplish just half as much as 
that which has been accomplished by our Chief; and as 
long as he is Chief of Police I know that the confidence 
which the police auxiliary has reposed in him will never 
be violated, and it is our prayer that he enjoy good health 
and that his tenure in office be long." 

The Auxiliary Police of Larkspur is composed of thirty 
(Continued on Page 15 ) 



March. 1043 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Training S. F. Police to Shoot 



By Inspector William Proll 



My desire in writing this article is two-fold. First, to 
show that I am certain that every member of the San 
Francisco Police Department is fully appreciative of 
the very able and proficient manner in which they are 
being taught to properly use their weapons of protection, 
namely: the revolver and the rifle. Every member of the 



of great importance, i. e., that a police officer unfamiliar 
in the use of his revolver cannot realize how helpless he 
may be in the case of an emergency when he is called on 
a moment's notice to protect himself and the lives of 
citizens. Whereas by following out the instructions given 
him, and the experience he obtains from these regular 




IN 1903 THIS TEAM BEAT WASHINGTON, D. C. PISTOL TEAM 

Back row, left to right — Officer W. W. Wilson, deceased; Inspector John E. Dolan, retired; Officer Harry 

Hook, deceased; Inspector William R. Proll, only member in active service. Front row — Officer F.W.French, 

Sergeant J. H. Helms, Officer Smith Carr, all deceased. 



Department is compelled to go through a regular routine 
of target practice so that he may qualify in his proficiency 
in the use of these weapons. 

The responsibility of giving instructions to the mem- 
bers of this Department were well placed by an order 
of Police Chief Charles Dullea in designating Officers 
Emile Dutil, Otto Dietschey, Fred Robbers, Henry Sass, 
William Niftier and Raymond Seyden, Dutil being the 
director and the others his assistants. These men are not 
only thorough in the knowledge of the use of firearms, but 
are very proficient instructors and consequently this de- 
partment is bound to advance very materially under their 
guidance to further advancement. 

The second thought in my mind, on this subject, is 



target practices, places him in an entirely different cat- 
egory. 

The most important obstacle, in the ability of most 
men to obtain good results, is that they are gun shy, which 
will cause them to flinch and miss the target. Another 
important factor is the constant practice of a proper trigger 
pull, and only by continued practice will he overcome this 
obstacle. 

Of recent date, I was required to report at the Police 
Target Range. With much pleasure, I listened to the in- 
structions given by Emile Dutil and his assistants and of 
going through the routine on the first day of sighting and 
dry shooting, i. e.. practicing shooting at a target without 
( Continued on Page 7 ) 



Pa.je 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1943 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief John A. Greening, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The January meeting of the Bay Counties Peace Of- 
ficers' Association was held this year at the Lakeside 
Country Club, with Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea 
as host. Chief Dullea had as assistants on this occasion 
Commissioners Walter McGovern and William G. Wob- 
ber. Commissioner Ward G. Walkup sent his regrets as 
he was convalescing from his recent auto accident. How- 
ever, he said he was with the members in spirit, and at 
1 p. m. of the meeting day he would drink a silent toast 
to the organization. 

More than 200 peace officers and their guests, made 
up of city officials, for the most part, from the various 
communities of the Bay area. There were many repre- 
sentatives of the Army and Navy. 

On hand as usual was the old standby entertainer Dr. 
Leo McMahon, with a brand new batch of stories that 
put everyone in a fine humor to enjoy the splendid food 
served on the occasion. 

Chief John Greening of Berkeley, presided at his first 
meeting since being elected president of the Association. 
He did a first rate job, and kept the meeting rolling right 
along after the food was disposed of. 

He told of the difficulties police executives were having 
in maintaining the proper personnel of police officers to 
carry out law enforcement, as a result of the demands of 
the war. He cited the experience of the Berkeley Police 
Department, stating that his Department had been so 
hard hit by the call of the Army and Navy it was found 
necessary to advertise for prospective police officers. 

He recited that advertisements were placed in news- 
papers up and down the coast advertising for candidates, 
and telling the world that Berkeley had raised the salaries 
for police officers until that city now paid the highest 
wages of any Police Department on the Pacific Coast, 
together with the relaxing of some of the entrance re- 
quirements. 

He said 400 applications were received from this ad- 
vertising campaign, 200 of which were immediately dis- 
missed because the prospects in making their applica- 
tions displayed a lack of ability to become members of a 
well organized police force. Further investigation as to 
the capabilities of the remaining 200 disposed of all but 
40, and of this number he hoped to get 24 men who 
would be able to meet the requirements of his Depart- 
ment. 

He suggested that the Association work with the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police in getting 
deferment for men hard to replace. 

He also informed the Association that state authorities 



had raised the sustenance fees of police officers who had 
to travel and be away from their homes from $4 a day 
to $5 a day. This applies to meals only. 

President Greening turned the meeting over to Host 
Chief Dullea, who introduced some of the guests present, 
including Municipal Judge Clarence Morris, whom he 
characterized as one of our ablest judges, and who has 
since his presence on the local bench given the closes; 
and heartiest cooperation to the San Francisco Police 
Department in all matters, especially in those activities 
applicable to the war measures. 

In presenting Edwin J. Cooley, of the office of Defense 
and Welfare Services, who was the speaker of the day. 
Chief Dullea briefly outlined the efforts of the War De- 
partment in controlling social diseases, and how the peace 
officers of the country were being marshalled into the 
campaign to protect the young men of the nation from 
the ravages of these diseases. 

He emphasized the determination of the Federal Gov- 
ernment to go all out in stamping out prostitution in all 
forms and he declared the days for winking at this evil 
were passed and that it was up to the officers of the law 
to give every assistance in this work. 

Mr. Cooley who is regional director of this area in an 
enlightening address presented many startling figures on 
his subject and left his audience greatly impressed with the 
necessity of giving every assistance in the drive to see that 
the men of the armed forces are returned to their homes 
free from the results of being infected by the two main 
social diseases. 

Supervisor Cooley, who is in charge of Defense Health 
and Welfare for the Pacific States and Arizona and 
Nevada, presented to the members of the Bay Peace Of- 
ficers many illuminating facts and stressed that the work 
of his department was not founded on any moralistic urge, 
but as an effort directed at protecting the youth of this 
country from the ravages of the two most common of 
social diseases. 

He emphasized that health and efficiency of our armed 
forces are dangerously jeopardized by the venereal diseases 
and that no plan had as yet been found to control these 
diseases, though several have been tried. The only thing 
left for the government to do was to repress them and to 
do this the government had to have the support of the civil 
authorities charged with enforcing the laws. 

To show how serious is this subject embracing venereal 
diseases, Director Cooley stated: 

That during the last war there were one-third more 
casualties from venereal diseases than battle injuries, and 



March. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



that seven and one-half million man days were lost in 19 
months. A sick soldier is worse than no soldier at all, he 
pointed out. 

In the selected draft 100,000 cases of syphilis were found 
prevelant in the first 2,000,000 men selected, and that 
gonorrhea was from three to five times more prevelant. 

So he said with these figures, all proven, the campaign 
he was a part of was a war measure that must be looked 
at with no idea of saving anybody but the warriors of this 
country. He declared that it was the determination of the 
Federal government to return every man sent to the war 
fronts to their homes with no more scars than those won 
in honorable combat. 

Repression of prostitutes, both commercial and clan- 
destine, was the only solution of the problem, he said, for 
it had been proven that segregated redlight districts, with 
their medical examinations had not solved the problem, in 
fact where these had flourished, and investigations made, 
it was found that the venereal diseases were more pre- 
velant than in areas where no such segregation existed. 

He put the matter up to the local police of each com- 
munity to stamp out prostitution, and this could be done 
only by a determined effort of those officers charged with 
the duty. Arrest, jail sentences, records of those arrested 
were the only things that would obtain the results neces- 
sary to repress the evils. Fines and probation following 
arrests had proven unavailing, he said. 

The ready response of many peace officers of the country 
was illustrated, he pointed out, by the fact that in nearly 
400 communities known houses of prostitution had been 
closed and the officers of these communities had displayed 
a fine sense of patriotism in face of opposition by those who 
believed prostitution could be controlled, and he compli- 
mented these officers for their courageous efforts. 

Especially did he compliment Chief Dullea and his 
officers for the results obtained in San Francisco, and he 
said this city had greatly reduced the rate of venereal 
diseases. Other communities of the Bay area, he stated, 
were responding in a most commendable manner. 

He also paid high respects to Judge Clarence Morris 
for his able and intelligent handling of the hundreds of 
cases of prostitutes that parade before his bench. 

Then urging the members of the Association to main- 
tain their splendid effort toward repressing prostitution. 
Director Cooley said that syphilis did 100 times more 
damage than infantile paralysis; 25 more deaths than from 
automobile accidents which average around 35,000 per 
year, and that there are three times more casualties from 
this disease than are due to smallpox, diptheria, scarlet 
fever and infantile paralysis combined. 

Some 2,000,000 people a year are affected by gonorrhea, 
he said figures reveal. 

He briefly related how some communities not cooper- 
ative with the War Department's objective in stamping 
out these two awful diseases, had been declared out of 
bounds and that this had proven a very effective move to 
impress the seriousness of the situation and of the deter- 
mination of the government to go through with the re- 
pression program. 



That the Association members went away with a serious 
determination to do all they could to protect our soldiers, 
sailors, marines and coast guardsmen was apparent, and 
the close attention paid to Director Cooley's address was 
silent testimony that he had the support of every peace 

officer present. 

* * * 

President Greening appointed the following committee 
to meet with the State Association committee to work 
out a plan for deferrment of essential men in the various 
law enforcement agencies: 

James Drew, Chairman, Chief Dierking, Chief Wall- 
man, Captain John Engler, Chief Doran, Chief Jones, 
Sheriff Gleeson, Sheriff Murphy, District Attorney Hoyt. 
Chief Dullea, Director Healy, and Chief Burke. 



NOTES OF THE MEETING 

Chief Louis Belloni of South San Francisco was 
telling Chief C. L. Collins of Redwood City that Chief 
William Maher of San Bruno was disappointed when they 
moved the Japs out of Tanforan. During their stay there 
Chief Belloni stated, Chief Maher had learned to say 
"hello" in Japanese, and if the Japs had stayed a little 
longer he could have learned to say "goodbye." 

* * * 

If anyone thinks the peace officers of this section of the 
state are not interested in civilian defense he should stand 
around and hear the boys discuss what is being done and 
what has been accomplished throughout this neck of the 

woods. 

* * * 

Chief Earl Dierking of Vallejo brought with him Harry 
L. Oliver. Oliver used to be undersheriff for Sheriff Jack 
Thornton, but Chief Dierking needing some able as- 
sistance to help police the ever increasing populous city 
of Vallejo prevailed upon the erstwhile undersheriff to join 
with the Vallejo Police Department, and he is now an 
inspector handling the Bureau of Identification. Sheriff 
Thornton lost a mighty good man, and Earl Dierking 

got a mighty good one. 

* * * 

Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald, secretary 
of the Association did a land office business, getting the 
members in up to date good standing by the payment of 
their annual dues. The following were voted into mem- 
bership : 

W. V. A. Schmidt of the Ernest Ingold Co. ; Deputy 
Sheriff Robert Robinson, Alma College; Dan London, St. 
Francis Hotel ; Judge Clarence Morris ; Police Commis- 
sioner Claude D. Mason, San Anselmo ; Harold Peterson, 
Sebastopol ; Wayne Thompson, Superintendent of Police, 
Richmond Shipyard No. 1,; Robert Hill, State Narcotic 
Bureau; John Wisterly, John Cost, San Mateo; Eugene 
Smith, C. W. Webb, W. B. Wright and W. C. Herup, 
San Rafael ; A. Smith, Pinkerton Agency ; J. O. Camden, 
Pinkerton Agency; Paul McCurl, Sergeant Richard 
White and Harold Norton, State Highway Patrol. 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Page 1 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1943 



San F 



Auxiliary Poli< 



an rrancisco /Auxiliary roiice 



One unit of the Civilian Defense program that Chief of 
Police Charles \V. Dullea and Deputy Chief Michael 
Riordan are justly proud of is the Auxiliary Police. Com- 
posed of public spirited and patriotic merchants, workers, 
manufacturers, brokers and men from every line of in- 




Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 

dustrial endeavor, there has been formed in San Fran- 
cisco an organization that would do credit to a regularly 
established metropolitan police force. 

Trained in every fundamental of the regular police 
officer, this organization today is a well drilled body 
of men ready at an instant's notice to take over duties in an 
emergency that would find the members of the Police 
Department, because of limited personnel, unable to 
handle without assistance. For over a year the Auxiliary 
Police organized and prepared under the direction of 
Deputy Chief Riordan has worked unceasingly and for 
long hours and serving at the same time in many capac- 
ities, is today a most formidable body of men, neatly uni- 
formed and equipped with such weapons as are necessary. 

To celebrate their first year's organization the Auxiliary 
Police last month assembled, after inviting Mayor Angelo 
J. Rossi, Police Commissioners Ward G. Walkup, Walter 
McGovern, and William P. Wobber, Chief Dullea, 
Deputy Chief Riordan, Jack Helms and John McKeown 
of the Civilian Defense directorate, at the Police Academy 
where ceremonies were held making the above named 
honorary members of the Auxiliary Police and presenting 
each with a special membership star. 

The members of the Auxiliary force appeared in their 
natty uniforms and stood at attention as the presenta- 
tions were made by Deputy Chief Riordan. The history 
of the organization was given and those present told of the 
unselfish devotion each member of the force had given to 




the city in this war emergency. 

Mayor Rossi in accepting his star said : 

1 accept with singular honor star No. 
1 of the Auxiliary Police force of San 
Francisco. 

Your fine organization is composed 
of men who are giving gratuitously of 
their time and their services to our 
people. 

As Mayor of San Francisco, I have 
carefully observed the functioning of 
the Auxiliary Police force and I am 

Mayor Ancei.o Rossi ha PP>' t0 relate that jt « one of the im " 
portant units in our Civilian Defense 

setup. To have achieved your present high state of effi- 
ciency it was necessary for you and your fellow members 
to have submitted yourselves to a rigid training and dis- 
ciplinary program which closely parallels the standards 
set by the United States Army. Great objectives can he 
reached only by persevering effort and toil, and you are a 
living example of what can be accomplished by fidelity 
to such principles. 

Your loyalty and devotion to duty in the Civilian De- 
fense field give renewed confidence to the people of this 
municipality that their welfare will be protected under 
any and all circumstances. Your patriotism has fortified 
the fighting spirit of our armed forces in the far-Hung 
battlefields by reason of the fact that the thought of the 
man in the combat lines that his home is being protected 
in his absence gives him a strength and a comfort which 
cannot be measured in words. 

1 will wear this star as a symbol of your loyalty, pat- 
riotism and courtesy, and should it be necessary to take 
up assignment in the gap of danger you can count upon 
me to stand side by side with you in protecting San 
Francisco against all enemies. 

On behalf of the Police Commission President Walkup 
made the following address: 

The members of the San Francisco Police Commis- 
sion are very happy, and indeed very proud, to receive 
these stars showing our affiliation with the Auxiliary 
Police of the San Francisco Police Department. 

We have watched the organization and development 
of the Auxiliary Police in this city with very much interest. 

Our Deputy Chief of Police, Michael Riordan, de- 
serves the highest praise for the splendid job of organiza- 
tion he has accomplished. He has proven himself to b? 
an organizer of great ability. Captain Barton has been a 
worthy assistant to Deputy Chief Riordan. You other 
men who are here today have also made valuable contri- 
butions to this most important work and we are proud 
of you. 

The Auxiliary Police of San Francisco have already 
shown that they are a very fine body of men. We are told 
that Police Auxiliary work in San Francisco is not ex- 



March, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



P aye L 



celled any place in the United States. We know that in 
the event of a great emergency you will prove your metal. 
Undoubtedly you officers and members of the Auxiliary 
Police are proud of your affiliation with the San Francisco 
Police Department. This great police organization to 
which all of us belong has a world-wide reputation for 
efficiency, good character and public service. 




Commissioner Ward G. Walkup 

Our Chief of Police — Charles W. Dullea — is a police- 
man's policeman. He is a leader of rare ability. He has 
the confidence of his men and of this Police Commission. 
As Mayor Rossi has often said, he is the greatest policeman 
in America. He would not ask any of you to do anything 
that he would not do himself. Honest, clean and brave, 
he is a man with a conscience — and a heart. You are for- 
tunate to have such a police leader and the people of San 
Francisco are fortunate in having such a Chief of Police. 

The Police Commission wants the Auxiliary Police to 
know that we are very appreciative of the great work 
they are doing for the public, and if the Auxiliary Police 
ever have any further problems in which we can help we 
want them to call on us. Chief Dullea and Deputy Chief 
Riordan frequently report to us on the work being done 
by you Auxiliary Officers. We know of your splendid 
record and we thank you again for these stars showing 
our membership in the Auxiliary Police. 



COMMISSIONER WALKUP HURT 
IN ACCIDENT 

The many friends, in and out of the Police Department, 
of Commissioner Ward G. Walkup, who until the middle 
of this month was President of the San Francisco Police 
Commission, are mighty glad that he is able to be back on 
the job after his narrow escape from death in an auto- 
mobile accident the morning of fanuary 1. 

Commissioner Walkup, his wife, William Kyne, general 
manager of Bay Meadows, and his wife, and Charles Ke\ 
Leslie, chauffeur for Commissioner Walkup, were return- 



ing from festivities incidental to the passing of the old 
year 1942. On Junipero Serra Boulevard, below the cem- 
eteries, an automobile driven by Heino D. Wanha, an 18- 
ycar-old shipyard worker, came booming at the Walkup 
car, using the wrong side of the road. A crash ensued and 
the two couples were so badly injured that they were 
taken to the Mills Memorial Hospital where the men 
folks remained for weeks. Mrs. Walkup and Mrs. Kyne 
were not so severely injured, and were released from hos- 
pitalization after a few days. Leslie, treated at the South 
San Francisco Hospital, escaped with minor injuries. 

As a result of the accident Attorney Walter McGovern 
has filed a damage suit for $45,500 against Wanha, on 
behalf of Commissioner and Mrs. Walkup and Mr. and 
Mrs. Kyne. 

Though not seriously injured, Mrs. Walkup's accident 
was a most regrettable one, for there isn't a woman in 
San Francisco who has entered so wholeheartedly into th? 
war effort as she. No activity having to do with raising 
funds, providing entertainment for soldiers and sailors and 
selling war bonds and stamps was passed up by Mrs. 
Walkup. She possesses a wonderful capacity for organiza- 
tion and getting things done and her absence from her 
rrany duties was sorely felt. 



MARIN CO. PEACE OFFICERS' ASS'N 

At the annual meeting of the Marin County Peace 
Officers' Association, held at San Quentin, with 90 mem- 
bers present the following officers were elected for the 
current year: 

President, Chief William V. Nicholson. Larkspur; 
first vice president. Warden Clinton Duffy, San Quen- 
tin; second vice president, Radio Technician J. M. Lewis, 
San Anselmo; secretary-treasurer, Judge John R. Flor, 
Larkspur. 

The Marin County Peace Officers' Association, now in 
its third year of existence, has proven to be one of the 
most timely associations to be organized in this area. 
With Marin County booming with thousands of workers 
at Marinship turning out sea-going vessels in record time, 
a problem has been presented that without an organization 
of its kind the work of properly policing the marvelous 
Marin region would have been a difficult one if each 
community peace officer organization had to work alone. 

With Sheriff Selmer, District Attorney Bagshaw, the 
Chiefs of Police of the various cities and towns, liquor 
enforcement officers, highway patrol officers, Warden 
Duffy and others charged with the important task of 
providing protection to the population, working in close 
harmony, Marin County today has a body of men who 
have overlooked nothing to give the maximum of police 
service under any and all circumstances. In a forthcoming 
edition we will go into detail of the work the Association 
has done as well as of the work each individual member 
has contributed to handling the problems produced by such 
an overwhelming increase in the population of a county 
that was given over more to happy country homes and 
recreation. 



/v /■/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1943 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

RE VISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE _ Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL Wellington, New Zealand 

Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 
IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 



BAY COUNTIES MEETING 

(Continued from Page 11) 

Those who signed place cards were: 

Commissioners Walter McGovern, William P. Wob- 
ber ; Chief Dullea; Deputy Chief Michael Riordan ; Cap- 
tain John Engler; Director George Healy; Captain of 
Inspectors Bernard McDonald; Captains Michael Mit- 
chell, Patrick Murray, Aloysius O'Brien, John Sullivan, 
John Reed, Leo J. Tackney, Alexander McDaniell, 
Michael Gaffey, Joseph M. Walsh; Director Arthur L. 
Christiansen; Officer Matthew Carberry ; Lieutenant 
Emmett Moore; Sergeant Walter N. Francis; and Officer 
Raymond Wertz. 

Sheriff Daniel Murphy, Judge Morris, Judge John 
McMahon, Edward James Cooley, J. O. Camden, man- 
ager Pinkertons Agency; E. A. Smith, superintendent 
Pinkertons Agency; Lt. Col. Edward F. Penaat, F. 
Mason, Major Joseph Sturm, Paul B. Cronk, Lieutenant 
R. H. Hibbard, Naval Shore Patrol; Lieutenant F. B. 
Ehlers, Bomb Disposal Officer ; Ensign A. A. Trast, U. S. 
Coast Guard ; Assistant District Attorney William P. 
Golden; Chief Paul Madden, State Narcotic Bureau; 
Office Manager Attorney General, S. Perry Walsh; Dan 
E. London, manager St. Francis Hotel. 

Chief J. J. Burke, U. S. Railway Mail Service; Robert 



H. Morse, Phil E. Geauque, U. S. Secret Service; Opie 
L. Warner; Undersheriff William Hollingbery; Charles 
Moore, Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co. ; Special 
Agent George Griffin ; Attorney General A. J. Kane ; 
Sidney Mackin, manager Government Relations; At- 
torney Walter Duane ; F. L. Barker, house officer I. 
Magnin ; Inspector John Misterly, State Narcotics; Joe 
O'Farrell, State Narcotics; Frank H. Tharp, manager 
Burns Detective Agency; Jack Helms, Director Civilian 
Defense; Dr. McMahon; Lieutenant Commander Paul 
H. Devince; Douglas Hayden, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Company; Inspector R. B. Hill; Dan Dan- 
ziger; Al Helgoe, American-Hawaiian Steamship Co.; 
Thomas Murphy, Telephone Company; W. E. Schoppe, 
superintendent National Auto Theft Bureau ; J. O. Cam- 
den, Pinkerton Agency — San Francisco. 

Chief Greening and Julian M. Thomas — Berkeley. 

Chief Thomas F. Burke, Councilman Claude J. Hier- 
schey, City Attorney E. A. Wilson, City Manager W. D. 
Soule, City Treasurer C. A. Gennever, Special Agent 
FBI John A. Cost, J. P. Britt— San Mateo. 

Former Chief James T. Drew, Frank A. Lever, CHP; 
Capt. H. F. Radbruch, District Attorney's Office; Capt. 
J. R. Frank, CHP; Provost Marshal George S. Badger — 
Oakland. 

Chief C. L. Collins, H. P. Williams, Sheriff James 
McGrath — Redwood City. 

Chief James J. Doyle, Officers Fred Perry, Al Girolo 
and Henry Meyer — Sausalito. 

Tim Sullivan — San Jose. 

Chief Louis Belloni, Judge L. A. Hardy, Councilman 
Reese Lloyd — South San Francisco. 

Chief John J. Harper, Commissioner Peter Dahl, 
Commissioner Allan F. Hunt, Councilman I. J. Roth — 
Burlingame. 

District Attorney Ralph Hoyt, W. F. Munay, Chief 
George R. Doran and Lieutenant L. R. Wendland — 
Alameda. 

City Clerk Eugene Smith, Councilman W. C. Hemp, 
Officer J. R. McDowell, Auditor W. B. Wright, 
Treasurer C. C. Webb — San Rafael. 

Chief L. L. Feathers, Robert Robinson, Constable E. 
O. Woods — Los Gatos. 

Chief W. L. Maher and Caesar Martinelli — San 
Bruno. 

Chief Donald Wood, Police Commissioner Claude D. 
Mason and Fire Commissioner Earl S. White. 

Chief L. E. Jones and Wayne Thompson — Richmond. 

Chief Louis Mann and Deputy Chief Frank Farina — 
Emeryville. 

Chief E. J. Foster — Sebastopol. 

Officer H. O. Peterson and Judge John R. Flor — 
Larkspur. 

Chief W. J. Wisnom and Allan Hartnett — Hills- 
borough. 

Chief Earl Dierking ami Inspector Harry L. Oliver. 

Chief L. G. Jester Albany. 

Chief A. H. Excell- -Mountain View. 



March, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman ]. Schwandt, Secretary- Treasurer 



Affiliated with A. P. C. O. 

Minutes of the Martinez Meeting, January 14, 1943. 

The January luncheon meeting of the NCPCOA was 
called to order by President Henri Kirby at 1 :30 p. m. at 
Armando's Tavern in Martinez, with George Burton as 
host. An excellent luncheon had been served at 12:30 p. m. 
Twenty-three mmebers and guests were present. 

Chief Prlaum of Piedmont, Chief Collins of Redwood 
City, Chief Woods of San Anselmo, and J. M. Lewis of 
San Anselmo took part in a discussion regarding the 
deferment of essential police officers and radio technicians, 
and it was suggested that an organized protest be made 
through National Body A. P. C. O. against drafting 
these men into the armed services. 

The highlight of the meeting was election of officers 
for the coming year. George K. Burton was elected pres- 
ident on a white ballot, as was Herman Schwandt, secre- 
tary-treasurer. George Burton is from Martinez Sheriff's 
office, and Herman Schwandt is from San Jose Police 
Department. The new board of directors are as follows: 
Herbert M. Watson, Richmond ; Henry Bogardus, Sa'i 



Francisco; Walter Wisnom, Chief of Police, Hills- 
borough; and Ed Bertola, California Highway Patrol, 
San Jose. 

John G. Lindquist of Berkeley offered to have the next 
meeting in Berkeley, and it was set for February 11, 1943. 

The following members and guests were present: 
Frank E. Winters, San Francisco Police ; Henry L. Bo- 
gardus, San Francisco Police; W. J. Wisnom, C. O. P., 
Hillsborough; George K. Burton, Sheriff's Office, Mar- 
tinez; Carrol Messier, Sheriff's Office, Martinez; B. 
McMurphy, Sheriff's Office, Alameda County; J. M. 
Ruys, Sheriff's Office, Alameda; Henri Kirby, San Jore 
Police; Herman J. Schwandt, San Jose Police; Ed Ber- 
tola, C.H.P., San Jose; C. E. Collins, C.O.P., Redwood 
City; John J. Hartnett, Deputy Chief, Burlingame; M. 
V. Pflaum, CO. P., Piedmont; Don Caples, Piedmont; 
Herb Watson, Richmond; John G. Lindquist, Berkeley; 
Donald Wood, C.O.P., San Anselmo; J. M. Lewis, San 
Anselmo ; D. T. Carter, General Electric Company, San 
Francisco; Mott Brunton, Linn Company, San Bruno; 
William V. Standi, Motorola Company, Norh Holly- 
wood. 



CHIEF DULLEA 

(Continued from Page 3) 
ment at a high point of efficiency were obtained. He has 
gone on with the work of completing the pistol range out 
on the shores of Lake Merced, and ere long that place, 
with every modern equipment, will be ready for the use 
of the members of the Department to maintain their 
marksmanship to a high degree. 

Radio, proper automotive equipment and adequate man- 
power has been provided, and changes in many functions 
to produce better efficiency have been adopted, especially 
where war needs are concerned. 

Chief Dullea has kept in close touch with peace officers' 
organizations, attending all meetings of the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police, the California State Peace 
Officers' Association, and the Bay Counties Peace Officers' 
Association, and has taken a prominent part in their activ- 
ities, serving on many important committees of each and 
taking a leading part in the promotion of better coopera- 
tion among law enforcement officers and the securing of 
appropriate laws that the present emergency makes neces- 
sary. 

Under his leadership during the past year the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department has never enjoyed a finer morale 
and the accomplishments of the men who have served 
under him will make a most impressive page in the h'Story 



of the Department. 

On the occasion of the end of his third year as Chief 
he received many messages of congratulation and many 
calls from citizens of San Francisco who commended him 
for the splendid manner in which he has given the utmost 
in protection to all and wishing him an even more suc- 
cessful fourth year. 



CHIEF NICHOLSON 



(Continued from Page 8) 
active members which meet every Monday night. Th's 
organization has been very faithful and the members have 
missed very few meetings. This organization has now the 
reputation of being the finest police auxiliary in Marin 
County. 

While commenting on the Chief we do not want to for- 
get his very devoted and faithful wife, Angela Nicholson, 
whom we all know has been his source of inspiration. They 
have been married for nineteen years, and Mrs. Nichol- 
son's maiden name was Fitzgerald. 



Night: RAndolph 8254 Day: DElaware 7278 

AIRCO HEATING CO. 

AIR CONDITIONING - WARM AIR HEATING 



Water Heaters - Sheet Metal 



5240 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



/', 



16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, I'M 3 



INSPECTOR FRANK BROWN PASSES ON the battlefield but as a member of the military police, 

In the death of Inspector Frank Brown since the last "-here his training here came in good steadv 

issue of The Journal, the San Francisco Police Depart- Fo '' some . months prior to his death Inspector Brown 

ment lost one of its heroes of World War I and a W ' 1S detailed to the Bureau of Identification under Di- 

mighty fine police officer. rector Thomas Burke. 
Frank Brown was born in Woodland, Januarj 28, 




Walkup Drayage 8C Warehouse Co. 



PASSING OUT MEDALS IN WORLD WAR I IN FRANCE 
Sergeant Frank Brown to left of United States Fiag Bearer 

1888, joined the Police Department October 9, 1916, 
eight years later he was made a corporal and on July 1, 
1925 was appointed a detective sergeant and a line ser- 
geant December 9, 1929. 

After serving in the Central Station until 1923 he was 
transferred to the Bureau of Inspectors, then to the De- 
tective Bureau. 

Most of his time in the Bureau was on the Auto Detail, 
and here he distinguished himself on many occasions by h'S 
courage and efficient work. He narrowely escaped being 
killed when he captured, on January 12, 1929, S. Boone, 
auto thief, who chose to shoot it out with Inspector Brown. 
Brown got the best of the argument. 

When World War No. I came along he joined in 
November, 1917. After three days at Camp Lewis he was 
sent to Camp Mills, New York, where he trained until 
he went overseas. 

In France he served with several units but finally landed 
in the battle line and was wounded in action, being one of 
the few members of the San Francisco Police Department 
who possessed the Purple Heart Decoration. 

He served in France until August when he was re- 
turned to the United States and was mustered out. 

An unassuming man. Inspector Brown rarely confided 
of his experiences in the war, but the history of the Third 
Division tells of the important part he took, not only on 



240 SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone EXbrook 3 188 

GREETINGS FROM 

THE UNITED PATTERN WORKS 



383 FREMONT- STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments to Chief Dullea 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 



HERBERT TRAYNOR 



Telephones: SUtter 1642 - 1643 

ROLANDO LUMBER COMPANY 

Fir — Spruce — Redwood 
YARD AND MILL 



FIFTH and BERRY STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone UNderhill 5 107 



ODORLESS DRY CLEANING CO. 

Affiliated with Independent Laundry 
J. E. B1DDULPH 



555 ALABAMA STREET (Near 18th) 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HALSTEAD 8C CO. 

Established 1883 

Telephone ORdway 3000 

ANY HOUR— DAY OR NIGHT— FOR 
EXPERIENCED ADVICE or ASSISTANCE 



1123 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone UNderhill 0285 RALPH MARINAI— PETER PIALORSI 

GOLDEN GATE POULTRY CO. 

Wholesale Live and Dressed Poultry and Eggs 
2254 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



March, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Telephone VAlencia 9620 

BLUE BIRD CAFE 

3 149 TWENTY-SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 

JACK'S LUNCH 



998 FOURTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone YUkon 0369 

ADDIE LUNCH COUNTER 

Good Coffee and Best Sandwiches 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 
Phone UNderhill 5438 

THE WOODWORKING SHOP 

Leg Carving — Carved Benches — Custom Made Frames and Turnings 

2 74 SHOTWELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone VAlencia 4338 



Telephone VAlencia 2 782 

THOS. WILLIAMS GROCERY 

Choice Imported and Domestic Groceries 

701 GUERRERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephones: HEmlock 5050 - 505 1 S. FORN1 

PACIFIC COAST BRANDS, LTD. 

Blanco Vista, Vina Vista, Cal-Best, Club Chateau, Cal Vista 

Forni's Vermouth — Bonded Wineries 4322 - 3587 

2700 EIGHTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



LINCOLN IRON FOUNDRY 



1000 TWENTY-FIFTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 9299 OLD CORNER 

OLD CORNER RESTAURANT 

Beer — Wines — Liquors — Italian Dinners 
1800 THIRD STREET (Cor. 16th) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



P. HERNANDEZ, Proprietor Telephone MArket 0266 



RANCHO GRANDE GROCERY 

MEXICAN AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES FREE DELIVERY 

2923 TWENTY-SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

STANDARD EGG CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone DOuglas 82 5 7 

HOTEL COLONIAL ESPANOL 

M. RIPODAS — Proprietors — B. RIPODAS 
400-402 PACIFIC AVE. (Corner Sansome), SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Residence Mission 2013 

VAN NESS SOUTH GROCERY 

E. OTTOBONI, Proprietor 
601 VAN NESS AVE.. SOUTH (Corner 17th) SAN FRANCISCO, 

Telephone VAlencia 1065 



P. J. CONROY 



FAIRFAX CAFE 



WINES AND LIQUORS — DINING ROOM 

In the Language of Mae West "Come and See Us Sometime" 
3900 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone Mission 9427 



DUNCAN (Jeff) SHERMAN, Proprietor 



CARNATION INN 



Where Folks Drop in for Good Cheer and Converse 

5006 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone MArket 9462 



BETTY CRENSHAW Telephone Mission 7912 



FRED RIENECKER 



THE DRY DOCK 

628 TWENTIETH STREET. (Near Third), SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

AYOOB WINE STORE 



BEACON PAINT COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
Resident : al and Industrial Paints, Varnishes and Enamels 

2833 ARMY STREET (West of Potrero Ave.) SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Mission 0745 



B. E. CANNON 



CALIFORNIA WINE 



2146 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 9494 

TRADE'S TAVERN 

You Ain't Seen Nothing Until You've Met "LILL" 

MARVELOUS DRINKS — DELICIOUS SANDWICHES 



491 HA1CHT ST. (at Fillmore) 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



GREETINGS 



W. C. TAIT COMPANY 



461 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone VAlencia 9030 

JOSEPH CASCIO 

ARMY GROCERIES 

3045 ARMY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ELkridge 172 1 

D. BASILI & SON GROCERIES 

Imported and Domestic Groceries, Poultry and Fruits 
62 71 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



WOODEN BOX & NOVELTY CO. 

Novelty — Hardwood and Softwood — Fancy Redwood Boxes 

2006 - 2014 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

TWENTY-FIVE LARGE DEPARTMENTS 

NEW MISSION MARKET 

The Food Center of the Missron 
2584 MISSION STREET (at 22nd)) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phones: MArket 5300 - 5301 OSCAR H. OSTLUND. Owner-Mgr. 

OSTLUND & JOHNSON 

Manufacturers and Contractors 

Bank. Store and Office Fixtures 

1901 - 1905 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone UNderhill 944 5 Bartisian: BILL GEORGE 

POKER TAVERN 

ANTON MACLIOCCO — ANCELO EDELI 
2 501 MARIPOSA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone UNderhill 7830 

EIGHTEENTH ST. GARAGE 



3874 EIGHTEENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 783 



"SIL" and "VINCE 1 



Telephone MArket 282 4 



THIRD STREET WINE & LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic Wines and Liquors 

4920 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone VAlencia 5 634 

ROY'S GROCETERIA & DELICATESSEN 



MARY SULVI 



Lunch and Soft Drinks 
3674 EIGHTEENTH STREET 



Candies and School Supplies 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone VAlencia 6255 



J. CHIODO, Proprietor 



3 148 TWENTY-SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



PROGRESS MARKET 

Imported and Domestic Groceries Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

600 SAN BRUNO AVE. (Cor. 18th St.) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



Sec. 567, P. L & R. 

J. S. POSTAGE 

°AID 

ia -iseo, Calif. 

iH 3172 











Whin i ii «»* 

w * 1MM1U § To win the War at the earliest possi- 
ilip 'Well* ble moment is the ambition of every 
person in these United States. *The 
Banks are putting their shoulders to the wheel! * It is the 
opinion of the Banks that the most valuable contribution 
they can make is in the promotion and sale to the public of 
War Bonds. ■*• This they have been doing with outstanding 
success throughout the past year. *We are proud to be play- 
ing an important part in this vital undertaking. 

Parker S. Maddux, President 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 1868 TRUST 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

SEVEN OFFICES . . . EACH A COMPLETE BANK 









Telephone DElaware 5369 



ENR1CA VANN1. Proprietor Market. GA. 3773 



Ranch. DE. 6336 



Residence. DE. 0085 



COTTAGE NURSERY 8C FLORIST 

Cut Flowers, Potted Plants, Fertilizer, Loam, Bedding Plants 

Floral Designs — Ferns 
JUN1PERO SERRA BLVD. DALY CITY, CALIF. 

Telephone South San Francisco 1477 

HOTEL CAFE 

JOHNNY MARCHI — RUTH MARINO 
Complete Bar Service Room and Board — Hail for Banquets 

2 15 LUX AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

A. PANTALEONI J. P1CCHI 

COLUMBO BOX COMPANY 

Orange Boxes, Celery Crates, Apple Boxes, L. A. Lugs, Lettuce Crates 

Fruit Boxes of All Kinds 
Phone ELkridge 3544 BOX 138. COLMA. CALIF. 

Telephone 507 J 

A. BARSUGLIA 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

222 LUX AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLIMENTS 
FROM 



RAFFITT RANCH 



BOX 250 



COLMA. CALIF. 



Telephone South San Francisco 38-W 

FRANK GIFFRA & SONS 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE — WINES AND LIQUORS 
240 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone MArket 0573 

H. NORDHAUSEN 

Builder and Designer of All Kinds of Commercal Auto Bodes 
Painting 

3 157 SEVENTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



J. T. CRESTA & CO. 

Growers and Dealers in All Kinds of Vegetables 
STALL No. 6 COLUMBO MARKET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone South San Francisco 144 1 LAURA SANDOVAL 

GRAND HOTEL 

ROOMS — BOARD 
733 BAYSHORE BLVD. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DElaware 4477 DAVID RICHETTI. Proprietor 

CASTLE GARDEN GROCERY 

Best of Groceries, Fresh Fruits, Vegetables. Italian Meats, Cheese, 

Bread, etc. — Wine and Beer — - Delivery Service 
SCHOOL ST. at STATION AVE. {3 blks. W of Mission) COLMA 

Telephone South San Francisco 1874 

SEA CAVE RESTAURANT 

FRANCOIS ERCOLI — PETER MALFATTI 

Lunches and Italian Dinners — Cockta I Lounge 

93 5 BAYSHORE BLVD. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



Galant Mattress and Upholstering Co. 

Manufacturers of Mattresses and Upholstering 



2229 GEARY STREET [n-ar Divisadero) 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone South San Francisco 1904 PABLO SALCEDO. Prop. 



UNION CLUB 



POOL HALL 
Wine, Beer and Cigars 

115 CRAND AVE. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS 
FROM 

SO. SAN FRANCISCO HOSPITAL 




Sm Franciscc 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 




AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



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EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



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TECHNICAL FISHERIES 
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Manufacturers oi 

VITAMINIFEROUS OILS 



Goheen 
Construction Co. 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 
MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 702 

EL ROY GARAGE 

F. J. FILIPPI, Owner 

MACHINE WORK 
GENERAL REPAIRING 

TOWING - BATTERY CHARGING 
MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Phone S. R. 3000 



Ross General Hospital 

Accredited by the American College of Surgeons 

and 
Member of the American Hospital Association 



ROSS, MARIN COUNTY, CALIF. 



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Compliments 

UNION ICE COMPANY 

354 PINE STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

* * • 



BUY WAR BONDS 



A. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pagcl 



Featured in This Issue 



Page 

History of Marin County Peace Officers' Asso. . 3 

District Attorney A. E. Bagshaw of Marin Co. 4 

Sheriff Walter Sellmer of Marin County ... 5 

Chief Frank Kelly of San Rafael 6 

The Town of San Anselmo 7 

Adult Prison Administration of California . . 8 
By Clinton T. Duffy, Warden, San Quentin 

Judge John R. Flor of Larkspur 10 

Judge Paul Helmore of Sausalito 11 

Judge Guy Ciocca of San Rafael 11 

Chief James F. Doyle of Sausalito 12 

Chief J. McGown of Mill Valley 13 

Judge George A. Corwin of Fairfax .... 13 

James M. Lewis, Marin Co. Radio Technician 14 

Chief Robert A. Tracy, Oakland's new Chief . 15 

Editorial Page 16 

Chief Andrew Peri of Fairfax 17 

Chief Oliver Oatfield of Belvedere 17 

Editor Boothe of San Rafael Independent . . 19 

No. Cal. Police Communication Officers' Asso. . 20 

Herman J. Schwandt, San Jose Radio Technician 21 

Marin Peace Officers' Meeting 23 

California Highway Patrolmen in Marin County 24 

Officers of Sausalito Police Department ... 25 

Mark Ellis, Marin Humane Officer .... 27 

Constable Manuel Albergi of Tomales ... 30 

H. O. Peters, Div. Special Agt. Northwest'n Ry. 31 

Arthur Fellows, Marinship Yards .... 32 

Deputy Chief Howard Clark, Larkspur ... 33 

Al Girolo, Sausalito Department 34 

Edmund T. Blum, Marin Probation Officer . . 35 

Corte Madera Police Department 36 

Bay Counties Peace Officers Meet 38 

S. F. Police Widows and Orphans Association 
Concert and Ball 39 



Ihc Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



Directory 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors .Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 13+1 31st Avenue 
Traffic Bureau Albert S. Munn 635 Washington St. 

Residence • 226 Jules Avenue 
Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 
Bur. of Personnel Lieut. George Healy Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services .'...Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Central Capt. M. E. Mitchell. ...635 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 
Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence -438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan. Drumm & Comm'l Sts. 

Residence -WIS 26th Street 

Mission ..Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 
Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 
Ingleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence- 2533 18th Avenue 

Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 
Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub-Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



When In Trouble Call SUtter 20*20 

When In Doubt 



Always At Your Service 



Page 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



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Compliments to 

MARIN COUNTY 
PEACE OFFICERS 



MARY BRAZIL 



I 



MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 




IN MEMORY 
OF 

CHIEF MANUEL MENOTTI 

OF 
SAUSALITO 



Compliments of 

MADDEN 8C LEWIS CO. 




San Francisco: 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



JUNE, 1943 



No. 1 



History of 
Marin County Peace Officers* Association 



A few of the far-sighted law enforcement officers of 
Marin County, realizing the inefficiency which existed 
in the various police departments of the county in coping 
with the question of crime, and with an aim in mind to 
unify the police activities of the entire County of Marin 
and to bring the various police departments into close col- 
laboration with one another, on November 24, 1939, 
started to organize the Marin County Peace Officers' 
Association. 

Among the leaders were District Attorney Albeit 
Bagshaw, Chief of Police Don Wood of San Anselmo, 
Sgt. Vernon Dwelly and Jack Agnew of the California 
Highway Patrol, H. O. Peters of the Northwestern 
Pacific, Under Sheriff Frank Kelly, Judge John R. Flor 
of Larkspur, Chief of Police W. V. Nicholson of Lark- 
spur, George Seaton, Corte Madera, Sheriff Walter B. 
Sellmer, and Deputy Sheriff Art Fellows. 

The purpose for which the organization was created 
was to secure a closer relationship of the police officers of 
the County of Marin ; to secure cooperation and coordina- 
tion in all police matters ; to elevate the standard of 
police institutions; to provide full tenure of office for 
those employed in the service ; to cooperate with all per- 
sons charged with the enforcement of law so as to secure 
full protection of all law-abiding citizens of the County 
of Marin, and for the prevention and detection of crime 
and the identification and treatment of prisoners. 

1 hirteen members were present when this organization 
was created, and the organization has grown steadily ever 
since, and today the organization has a membership of 
approximately 100 peace officers. Virtually every law- 
enforcement agency of Marin County is a member of the 
organization. The Chiefs of Police of the nine incorpor- 
ated areas are members, they being: 

Chief Don Wood of San Anselmo, W. V. Nicholson 
of Larksour, James McGowan of Mill Valley, James 
Dovle of Sausalito, Andrew Peri of Fairfax, Oliver 
Oldfield of Belvedere, T. Meuser of Corte Madera, Jos. 
Regoni of Ross, and former Chief Barney Ruschetti of 
San Rafael. 



Other members are Warden Clinton T. Duffy of San 
Quentin and his staff; Sheriff Walter B. Sellmer and his 
staff ; the members of the District Attorney's office, includ- 
ing Deputy District Attorney Harold Haley and Harold 
Riede; the members of the judiciary of Marin County, 
including Superior Court Judge Edw. I. Butler; Justices 
of the Peace, Paul Helmore of Sausalito, Herman R. 
Rudolff of Novato; Police Judge John R. Flor of Lark- 
spur, Guy Ciocca of San Rafael, George Corwin of Fair- 
fax. The membership also consists of Harold Elliott, 
Liquor Control Agent for the Board of Equalization of 
Marin County; R. J. Yates, Fish and Game Commission ; 
Edmund Blum, Adult Probation Officer; Captain H. H. 
Spomer, Marinship; Constable Fred Nave of Novato; 
Manuel Alberigi of Inverness; and the following mem- 
bers of the California Highway Patrol: Sergeant Vernon 
Dwelly, Sergeant David Menary, J. J. Agnew, Ivan 
Carbine, Ronald Hewett, E. F. Monteverde, Elwood 
Molseed, Nyron Jas. Smith, Geo. Edw. Tobin, A. D. 
Truett, Thos. H. Wentworth, and Dave Zebo. Also 
Harry M. Williams, Deputy Coroner of Marin County; 
J. M. Lewis, Radio Technician of Marin County; and 
Mark Ellis, Officer of Humane Society. 

The membership worked diligently in bringing about 
and establishing in Marin County a full and complete 
radio station to serve the County of Marin. The station is 
known as KSRC and is operated from the Sheriff's office. 
This station also handles all emergency matters for the 
office of O. C. D. The organization was very fortunate in 
having in the county James M. Lewis, radio technician, 
who was the guiding genius in the installation of this sta- 
tion, and it is today being controlled and operated under 
his direction. All of the police cars of the incorporated 
areas and the sheriff's cars, as well as the California High- 
way Patrol motorcycles and cars are equipped with two- 
way radio sets. 

Since the peace officers' organization in Marin County 
has been functioning, they have unified their efforts and 
have been able to control the crime problems. They have 
also unified a defense program for the protection of the 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



civilians of Marin County in the event there should ever 
he a prison break at San Quentin. This organization is 
ever on the alert to protect and guarantee the internal 
security and safety of the people of Marin County. 

Since the organization came into being the following 
officers have served or are now serving: 

Year 1940: President, Albert Bagshaw ; First Vice- 
President, H. O. Peters; Second Vice-President, James 
McGowan; Secretary and Treasurer, Don T. Wood. 

Year 1941 : President, H. O. Peters; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, Don Wood ; Second Vice-President, Edmund T. 
Blum ; Secretary and Treasurer, Paul Helmore. 

Year 1942: President, Don Wood; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, W. V. Nicholson ; Second Vice-President, F. C. 
Nave; Secretary and Treasurer, Judge John R. Flor. 

Year 1943: President, W. V. Nicholson; First Vice- 
President, Warden Clinton Duffy; Second Vice-Presi- 
dent, J as. M. Lewis; Secretary and Treasurer, John R. 
Flor. 

Among distinguished speakers who have appeared be- 
fore this organization and have given its members inter- 
esting and informative talks on the many subjects dealing 
with the many ramifications of police work include : Phil 
Geaque of the U. S. Secret Service, Treasury Depart- 
ment; Dr. David G. Schmidt, psychiatrist of San Quentin 
prison; H. O. Peters, Fireams expert; Jos. Sheehan, State 
Board of Equalization ; Inspector Walter R. Creighton, 
Narcotic Bureau ; C. J. "Jerry" Campbell, Special Agent, 
FBI ; John Plover, Chief Probation Officer, State of Cali- 
fornia ; Warden Clinton T. Duffy of San Quentin ; Frank 
Soencer, Post Office Inspector; H. C. VanPelt, Agent of 
the FBI; Jos. Bordanaro, Coordinator of Marin County; 
Julian Thomas, authority on International Law; Agent 
Lapachet of the FBI, and James C. Purcell, authority on 
Civil Rights. 

Through the efforts of this organization Marin County 
now has one of the best police units in the State of Cali- 
fornia. They have left nothing undone. To assist in the 
war effort, all departments have organized auxiliary police 
and the auxiliary police have been trained very efficiently. 
Perhaps an example of the two finest auxiliary depart- 
ments are found in San Anselmo under the leadership of 
Chief Don Wood, and in Larkspur under the supervision 
of Deputv Chief of Police Howard Clark. 

The organization was formed with a purpose in mind 
and that is to afford adequate police protection, and the 
organization has accomplished the aims for which it was 
organized. It is the hope of the officers of the organization 
that each year will find it growing much stronger, and, 
with this organization functioning efficiently, Marin 
County will be a very poor haven for those who are bent 
on lawlessness and crime. 



DIST. ATTORNEY A. E. BAGSHAW 

OF MARIN COUNTY 

One thing the law-abiding people of Marin County take 
great pride in is their district attorney. Albert E. Bagshaw 
has held this office since 1934, and during that time he has 
made Marin one of the cleanest counties in the State. 
There has been no open gambling, and that which is car- 
ried on surreptitiously is not long lived. There are no houses 




iry- 



COLLEGE GROCERY STORE 



For Quality Merchandise at Reasonable Prices 
^ENTFIELD CALIFORNIA 



District Attorxet A. E. Bagshaw 
of Marin County 

of prostitution in that county. Slot machines have never 

gotten a hold under District Attorney Bagshaw, and 

you find criminals of the so-called upper brackets get a 

short ride to San Quentin. 

Beside having the highest appreciation of the duties of 
his office, District Attorney Bagshaw is probably a little 
more inclined to give the law breakers short shift, because 
he was born in Mill Valley, coming from a pioneer family 
of the county. 

He got his earlier education in Mill Valley and at- 
tended Lick-Wilmerding high school in San Francisco, 
then St. Ignatius, now San Francisco College. 

Getting his license to practice law in 1927, he was first 
engaged in public service as secretary to U. S. Marshall 
Esola and as a prosecutor for the late prohibition bureau 
in the late '20s. He did such good work and displayed so 
keen an insight of his duties that when George Hatfield 
was U. S. Attorney in San Francisco he appointed young 
Bagshaw as a deputy and he served in that capacity until 
he was elected as district attorney in 1934. 

Believing organization of law enforcement officials is a 
necessity, he has taken an active part in the District At- 
torneys' Association, and was one of the moving spirits in 
the formation of the Marin County Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation. He is paid a high compliment among his friends in 
being described as the same kind of official as Governor 
Earl Warren. 

District Attorney Bagshaw married a San Francisco 
young lady, Miss Audrey Van Passel, and they have two 
daughters, Miss Dianna, 11 years, and Vanna, a young 
miss of 6 years. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Sheriff Walter Sellmer of Marin County 



Marin County boasts of the only sheriff in the state 
with an air pilot's license and who owns and flies his own 
plane. That would be Sheriff Walter Sellmer. But that is 
not the only thing that commends him as one of the state's 
leading peace officers. 

He had, previous to becoming sheriff of that marvelous 
community, back in 1930, been a warden for the Division 




Sheriff Sellmer and Deputies 
of Marin County 

of Fish and Game, and in that capacity displayed the 
talents for law enforcement that indicated his fitness to 
take over the chief job as Marin County's leading crime 
preventer. Recognizing, from his long years as a resident 
of Marvelous Marin, that this county was more of a resi- 
dential and recreational center, he also recognized that 
good law enforcement would attract the proper people to 
the section and further promote the beauties of that favor- 
ite bay area. To this end he centered his efforts. He 
modernized the sheriff's office, succeeded in getting more 
deputies, and spread them over his terrain in a manner to 
get the maximum of results. 

The Marin County Sheriff's Office is in its twelfth 
year under Sheriff Walter Sellmer's administration — an 
up-to-the-minute organization and nerve center for main- 
taining the peace in the county. 

Twelve years ago Sheriff Sellmer stepped into a quiet 
office in this very large community — with an undersheriff, 
and civil deputy to manage the affairs of the county. 
Records were kept in a log hook, and criminal arrests in 
a jail register. However, with the growth of the county, 
and Sheriff Sellmer's untiring efforts, the office began to 
grow, and its usefulness in the community was correspond- 
ingly increased. 

A regular Bureau of Identification was installed, and 
filing and indexing systems placed in use. The State 1 ele- 
type System was at this time placed in service, and the 



Sheriff's Office at San Rafael chosen as one of the initial 
locations. 

In the year 1930, just prior to Sheriff Sellmer's induc- 
tion into office, there were three hundred bookings in the 
county jail register. At the end of 1942 fifteen hundred 
and fifty were booked in the county jail. 

After the development of the Bureau of Identification, 
a modern dark-room was installed in order to facilitate 
more rapid and inexpensive handling of the office photogra- 
phy, and later copying apparatus was installed, until now 
the Photographic Bureau boasts the most modern equip- 
ment. 

Two years ago the Marin County Police Radio System 
was placed in operation under the direction of Mansfield 
Lewis, with the main station located in the Sheriff's Of- 
fice, and manned by the office deputies. 

Last year, for the needs in southern Marin County, the 
Marin City Sub-station was opened under direction of 
a chief deputy sheriff, and now polices the area con- 
tiguous to the shipyards and Marin City. 

Special deputies in all outlying districts have been sworn 
in and are subject to call at all times. Each of the outlying 
districts standing by for instructions by radio in event of 
emergency or disaster. 

The office force of originally three has now expanded 
to fifteen at San Rafael, and six at the Marin City Sub- 
station, thus adequately covering the busier areas from the 
most centralized stations. 

Sheriff Sellmer has given the utmost in cooperation with 
the chiefs of police of the various incorporated towns and 
cities, and the constables of unincorporated areas, as well 
as to those charged with the security of the great ship- 
yards at Sausalito. You will not find many unsolved crimes 
on the records of Marin County's public records, and this 
is due to the fine administration of Sheriff Sellmer and his 
determination to keep his department up to the minute in 
every detail. He gives the fullest of assistance to neighbor- 
ing peace officers and Marin County is to be congratulated 
on having such an efficient and energetic official. 



Very Old Gentleman: "Officer, does this car approach- 
ing us go to the beach ?" 

Traffic Officer: "Yes. This is one of a series of cars that 
go to the ocean beach." 

Old Gentleman: "I am what you fellows out here 
would call a Vermont Yankee. That is why I asked you 
if the car that just passed went to the beach. I have been 
at this corner for over an hour, and what do you think — 
every smart aleck conductor I asked about the car just 
reached out his hand to lift me in and said : 'OK, dad — 
come along.' I guess that kind of Hollywood stuff is what 
I was warned about." 

(Always you will run across people who demand Al- 
phonse and Gaston courtesy.) 



Payc 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



Chief of Police Frank Kelly of San Rafael 

At the last municipal election in San Rafael, the voters predict he will be chief in San Rafael for a long time. 



of that quaint and attractive Marin city elected a new 
chief of police, and they selected, by an impressive vote, 
Undersheriff Frank Kelly for the responsible position. 

In this respect it is well to say the voters displayed rare 
judgment, for the new Chief is perhaps the most popular 





Chief Frank Kelly 

and one of the most efficient law enforcement officers in 
the County of Marin. He is a veteran of more than 10 
years in police work, and during that time has justly 
earned the reputation of being one of the squarest of peace 
officers — not only by his fellow members in the Marin 
Peace Officers' Association, but by the hundreds of crim- 
inals and near criminals he has been called upon to arrest. 

He has never been known to take an advantage of a 
suspect and does everything possible to give a defendant 
the benefit of the doubt. However, if he believes a de- 
fendant is guilty of a crime, he asks and gives no quarter 
in an effort to bring about a conviction. 

Chief Kelly started out in life as a plumber, but back 
in 1932 he joined up with the California Highway Patrol, 
where he further became convinced that law enforcement 
was his vocation. After two years as a speed chaser, he re- 
signed to join the San Rafael Police Department. So well 
did he make good on this assignment that Sheriff Walter 
Sellmer, ever on the watch for efficient officers, offered 
him a place on his staff, and in 1937 we find him a deputy 
sheriff. 

His knowledge gained by experience in police affairs, 
and his abilitv and energy soon took him to the under- 
sheriff billet, and it was through the great work he did in 
rYf Sheriff's Office that led to his selection as Chief of 
Police of Marin, this city being one of the four cities in 
California who elects its chief of police. 

On his past record it takes no stretch of imagination to 



Chief Kelly is married to the former Catherine Kelly 
of Sacramento. They have a son, Francis, 20 years of age, 
who is a member of the U. S. Army Aviation Signal 
Corps in Florida, and a daughter, Beverly, age 1 1 years. 

The chief takes an active part in all civic affairs of 
Marvelous Marin. He is past president of the Native 
Sons, treasurer of the Eagles, a member of the Knights of 
Columbus and the Elks, and treasurer of the plumbers' 
union. He is one of the wheel horses of the Marin Peace 
Officers' Association, and has had much to do with its 
splendid accomplishments. 



KSFO NEWS EDITOR COLLECTS 
PIPE CLEANERS 

Pipe cleaners from all over California poured in on 
Austin Fenger, KSFO's news editor, following his broad- 
cast of a United Press story about the need of a little nine 
year old Ohio girl for them to keep clear a silver tube in 
her throat. 

Manufacture of the pipe cleaners was halted because of 
the war, so pipe smokers were asked to give some up so the 
little girl might live. Enlarged tumors in her esophagus 
interfere with normal breathing, so she has used a silver 
tube for respiration since infancy. 

As many as 120 pipe cleaners a day, depending upon 
the weather are needed to keep the tube clear. 

Although newscaster Fenger aired the story only once 
at 1 1 :00 o'clock Saturday morning, when he arrived at the 
studios atop the Mark Hopkins Hotel on San Francisco's 
famed Nob Hill at his usual hour of 5 :00 o'clock Monday 
morning, he found envelopes full of cleaners from all over 
the state. 

He is becoming convinced that California listeners are 
among the most generous people anywhere. Recently, he 
led a drive for hunting knives for men in the southwest 
Pacific that resulted in KSFO turning in 5,000 blades to 
the Fourth Army Air Command. 

Fenger does 39 news broadcasts per week for KSFO, 
which is famed for its fast accurate news coverage through- 
out the Pacific Coast. 



Lady: "Would I need a lawyer in case I am arrested on 
account of my dog?" 

Officer : "Well, in misdemeanor cases the defendant is 
not generally represented by a lawyer. What is the charge 
you anticipate, lady?" 

Lady: "Well, of all the impertinent questions — so, 
young man, you want to be all ready for my conviction. 
Well, you have another guess coming." 

( Politeness is not what it is cracked up to be — some- 
times.) 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



II 



The Town of San Anselmo . . , 
The Greatest Little City in California 



Situated in the heart of the metropolitan area of Marin 
County on the rolling slopes of Mt. Tamalpais, San An- 
selmo, with a population of 7,500, has a police depart- 
ment of seven men headed by Donald T. Wood, Chief 
of Police. 




Chief Donald Wood, front center, and his San Anselmo 
Police Department 

Chief Wood, immediate past-president of the Bay 
Counties Peace Officers' Association and the Marin 
County Peace Officers' Association, has coupled experience 
with training in preparing himself for the important posi- 
tion he holds. As police chief of the "Greatest Little City 
in California," he is able, by applying the knowledge he 
has gathered from study and service as a police officer, to 
give the people of that sylvan residential community the 
ultimate in police protection. 

The problems he has are not as manifold as are found 
in the towns and cities where industry and commerce 
engage many men for work. San Anselmo is strictly a 
home city scattered over the hills and sloping hillsides, and 
it is to see that the people who own and live in these homes 
are protected from the predatory peripetitic pilferer that 
he has given the people a police department they may well 
be proud of. 

He has a force of six men ; he has a fleet of the latest 
Royal Chryslers equipped with two-way radio and a two- 
way' radio station ; and he has every other thing for making 
as modern a police department as will be found in any 
large city. His men all work in prowl cars and every sec- 
tion of the town is thoroughly covered through every 
twenty-four hours. Such few crooks who have sought tem- 
porary funds by jimmying a window have found they 
were not alone, when they desired complete privacy, and 



soon realized that their unexpected company was a 
minion of the law, who had him on the way to the lockup 
before he could deprive a home owner of some of his 
chattels. 

Thirty-three years ago Chief Wood decided police work 
was an attractive calling. He took up a course of training 
under the late Frank H. De Pue, noted Ray criminologist. 
From 1910 to 1914 he was a pupil under this distinguished 
authority. In the latter year he became a member of the 
Berkeley Police Department, serving for six years, with 
the exception of an interlude tha' took him into the army 
during the World War. 

Failing health from war experience caused h ; m to ret're 
from the Berkeley Police Department and he went to 
Marin County to recuperate. In his new surroundings, 
when his health permitted, he engaged in the contracting 
business. Corre 1930, San Anselmo needed a new chief 
of police and the Mayor and City Council selected 
Donald T. Wood. 

He set about immediately to make the department 
modern in every way, and get it away from the "Small 
Town Cop" idea, a term applied to village law enforce- 
ment officers in bygone days. 

Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, a main secondary high- 
way, runs through the length of the city, and, having two 
grammar schools and numerous school crossings on this 
highly-traveled boulevard, he realized that additional pro- 
tection was needed for the children and formed the first 
Junior Traffic Patrol in Marin County in 1930. This pa- 
trol, now numbering 78 members, has so safely guarded 
these crossings that, in the thirteen years, not a single 
child has suffered an injury while being escorted by these 
gallant little patrolmen. 

One of the most important advancements he made was 
in 1934 when he convinced the city authorities he ought 
to have a two-way radio system. There was only one 
around the Bay then, that being the City of Piedmont. 
He had made such wonderful progress in his organization 
of the small force under him that he had no trouble in 
getting his station, and it has more than justified its 
existence. It has enabled him to carry on in the fast- 
growing community without increasing personnel, which 
would have been necessary without this service. The 
sneeding up of contact between the officers and headquar- 
ters has kept every man in instant touch and enables 
them to get an emergency call at any time and anywhere. 
The San Anselmo radio station was the forerunner of the 
now ultra-modern two-way radio station KSRC, owned 
and operated by the County of Marin, the installation of 
which was a personal triumnh for Chief Wood. His per- 
s'stent efforts through seven years of setbacks and dis- 
(C'tntintud on page 18) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



Adult Prison Administration in California 

By Clinton' T. Duffy, Warden. California State Prison, San Quentin, California 



California's prison system originated in the year 1851 
during the gold rush period. Prior to that time, the only 
means of confinement was in small jails throughout the 
state, and the major offenders on a prison ship which was 







" -3P 1 . 'W* i 




Clinton T. Duffy 
Warden 
Born on the San Quentin Prison reservation in 1S9S. Started to 
work at San Quentin, November, 1929, as Secretary to the War- 
den. Later became Historian, then Assistant Clerk to the State 
Board of Prison Directors. Appointed Warden, July 13, 1940. 

anchored in San Francisco Bay. Point San Quentin was 
possibly chosen because of its proximity to San Francisco, 
the center of population, and its accessibility by water. 
The prison first operated under a lease system which was 













J. H. Fletcher 

Captain of the Yard 

Also a Deputy Warden in connection with care and custody. 

later abandoned — during that time of the institution. A 
few years later, due to demands on the Lieutenant- 
Governor, this was changed and the warden system which 
we are operating under today was established. 

The present method devised to handle our prison popu- 
lation is, First: San Quentin — the receiving, observation, 
and classification institution of the entire svstem for all 



male offenders. At San Quentin a careful study of back- 
ground, case, and the individual himself is made. Classi- 
fication is determined as to whether the inmate involved 
is a minimum, medium or maximum case. From San 
Quentin all transfers are made to other institutions or 
branches of confinement — a direct result of classification. 
Incarceration should be, for the average man, a period 




Charles B. White 

Executive Secretary to the Warden. Also a Deputy Warden 

in connection with administration in general 

of rehabilitation. That confinement is punishment is my 
theory and I firmly believe that every man while in 
prison should be given the opportunity to improve him- 
self. The majority of men, especially the "youngsters" who 





Charles J. Bauer 
General Manager of Prison Industries 
Also a Deputy Warden in connection with all industries, main- 
tenance and care of grounds. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



reach prison can be re-made if given the right opportunity 
for that reconstruction. The administration is working 
toward that goal. 

Educational courses are available from elementary 
schooling to university extension work. Vocational in- 
struction and training in the widest possible number of 
crafts and occupations is available and is to be extended. 
Research proves that a large number of men had not 
learned, previous to their commitment, a definite work 
habit-pattern. Emphasis is being placed upon industrial 
training, which includes trades in the war effort such as 
welding, shipfitting, machinists, marine cooks and bakers, 
etc. Since life outside the walls is concerned principally 
with building up American defenses, the men inside must 




D. G. Schmidt, M. D. 
Chief Psychiatrist 
A member of the Classification Committee. His duties and func- 
tions are innumerable. A very careful and complete study of each 
inmate's history is made by the Chief Psychiatrist. All informa- 
tion he receives concerning the inmate after an extensive cor- 
respondence is verified. The Board of Prison Terms and Paroles 
would not consider any case of sex offenders luithout a complete 
psychiatric report. 

be prepared to re-enter normal life as normal men, with a 

chance to get and hold a job, which gives us more reason 

to train men toward the kind of service that is open to 

them in a national emergency — jobs with industry. 

Rehabilitation must come from within the individual. It 
is for the administration to rebuild characters and to 
allow the inmate to regain self-respect. Our program on 
adult prison administration is being built in anticipation 
of the day our inmates are released from prison. There 
has been no let-down in discipline. Discipline must be 
vigorously maintained. Bettering discipline by bettering 
conditions and increasing privileges among prisoners may 
sound paradoxical but it works out in practice. 

The foundation of any prison is laid in its rules. Laxity 
brings trouble. Swift, sure, but humane dealing with dis- 
ciplinary problems builds morale among inmates and offi- 
cers. In order to insure the smooth operation of any 
prison, it is necessary that the employees be intelligent 
and interested in their work. 

My years at San Quentin have taught me that no man is 



past restoration to worth-while citizenship, provided he 
retains his sanity. Many men in prison are basically the 
same as the men on the outside. Man is an individual — 
there are no two alike. There is not, nor do I believe there 
can be formulated any fixed rules of action for all men. 
Each man must be treated as an individual and judged 
the same way. Prison is a place of rehabilitation and not 
a hole into which a man who has committed a crime is 
thrown until it is decided that he has paid. It is not always 
so much dealing with warped minds — but untrained 
minds. If we give them the proper training, make them 
see things in the right light, we are giving them a chance 
in life, to carry on as an integral part of our great nation. 

To give you some small idea of the many things we are 
doing to aid the war effort in San Quentin alone, we have 
contracts with the Navy, in addition to the steel nets, for 
the manufacture of mattress covers in our tailor shop; 
manufacture of sacks for sand bags and jute yardage for 
other purposes in our jute mill. We have already com- 
pleted a large number of steel compartment trays for 
cafeteria service and will manufacture many more for 
the armed forces. Our laundry is busily engaged in doing 
the wash for the officers and men of the Navy, as is our 
shoe department so engaged in repairing shoes for this 
branch of the service, as well as for the State Guard. 

Furniture has been, and is being manufactured, for the 
armed forces, and, believe it or not, the inmates made — 
and willingly — hundreds of night sticks for the State 
Guard of California. Also there are deck gear of all kinds 
being manufactured for the Merchant Marine, and a 
salvage project is reclaiming rubber-covered copper wire 
for the Navy. 

There are several hundred inmates who have been 
granted provisional parole to lend a hand in harvesting 
California's vital crops. These men have been released to 
farmers and orchardists who have requested their services, 
and who had provided specified conditions, such as accom- 
modations, transportation, and payment of prevailing 
wages. These men have filled a need in an acute labor 
shortage. America needs workmen as well as soldiers. And 
a sound administrative program is being correlated with 
rehabilitation, and a foundation is being laid for the 
recognition of those who wish to rehabilitate. 

Phone: South San Francisco 700 

J. B. PILKINGTON NURSERY 

General Line Nursery Stock - Fruit Trees - Roses - Citrus Trees 
EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE. CALIF. 

DEAD END LUNCH 

Good Food and Best of Service 
1779 I6TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF 

Phone RAndolph 03 7 7 

A. MAGHELLA GROCERY 

Groceries, Wines and Liquors 

123 1 CENEVA AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAlencia 0446 

Italian California Wine Co., Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 
2966 24TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



Judge John R. Flor of Larkspur, California 



Since moving to Marin County in 1937, Judge John 
R. Flor has been very actively engaged in the civic affairs 
of the community. When he decided to make his home 
in Marin, he also decided to take an active interest in the 




Judge John Flor 
Larkspur 

government of the county and to add his bit to make 
Marin County a better place in which to live. 

He was appointed police judge of Larkspur in 1939 
and has retained that office ever since. Since becoming 
judge of the City of Larkspur he has built up a reputation 
for extreme fairness in the court room to all parties con- 
cerned. He possesses courage and is fearless in making his 
decisions. He always believes that everyone is amenable to 
the law and "Let the chips fall where they may." Judge 
Flor does not tolerate the dismissals of actions when once 
they have been filed in his court. He frowns upon the in- 
terference by anyone with any case pending in his court, 
and he will brook no interference with the administration 
of justice. However, he always endeavors to give a de- 
fendant his day in court and at all times gives a sentence 
which fits the crime committed. He has handled many 
marital disputes and seemingly has uncanny ability in 
smoothing the rough seas of married life. 

Judge Flor has taken a very active interest in the youth 
of the county and is ever on the alert in matters of juvenile 
delinquency. 

Police officers who have brought defendants into his 
court have found that he is ever ready to protect the inter- 
ests of the accused as well as the interests of the police 
officer, and everything possible is done to avoid any in- 
justice. 

In the Marin County Peace Officers' Association Judge 
Flor has been very active, and is keenly interested in the 
organization because he believes in strict law enforcement 
and knows that the organization has within its power the 



ability to make Marin County a decent law-abiding com- 
munity. He has been elected twice as secretary and 
treasurer of the Association. 

Judge Flor was admitted to the bar in 1926 in the 
State of California and has engaged in the practice of law 
since that time, so he comes to the bench well qualified. 
His academic work was taken at the University of South- 
ern California and he received his law degree at the Uni- 
versity of California (Hastings College of the Law). 
While attending the University of California he indulged 
in journalism and was awarded the Gold Pen of the 
"Press Club." 

Judge Flor is married to Constance Watts of London, 
England, and both the judge and his wife have been 
devoting a great deal of their time to the war effort. 



ROBERT P. ELDER 

SPECIAL OFFICER— LARKSPUR 

Back in 1919 Robert P. Elder, mostly known as Bob 
Elder, worked for W. F. "Bill" Jones during the height 
of lumber activities with the Hume Bennett Lumber Co. 
in the High Serras of Fresno County. His foundation of 




Robert Elder 

law and order started under the supervision of Bill Jones 
back in the woods where a crook was soon found out and 
duly taken care of. 

The following year Bill Jones was elected as Sheriff of 
Fresno County and during his three terms as Sheriff, Bob 
served as an investigator in the District Attorney's office 
and then as a deputy under Sheriff Jones. In 1922 he mar- 
ried Eunice Harper of Fresno and moved to Marin County 
where he has been connected with the Larkspur Police 
Department as a special officer. 

Visit the Smartest Room in Town . . . 

THE CIRQUE ROOM 

Supper Dancing every night of the week, with a Special Feature 
on Monday evenings .... No cover charge at any time 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Steven W. Royce, Managing Director 
Bernard J. Leonard, Resident Manager 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Judge Paul Helmore of Sausalito 

Judge Paul Helmore for the past 28 years has held the has conducted his office in such an honest and efficient 



office of Justice of the Peace of Sausalito Township. He 




Judce Paul Helmore 



manner that the people in his jurisdiction gave him an 
unprecedented vote in the last election, returning him to 
office. The large vote he received is indicative of his con- 
scientious efforts in the administration of justice. He is 
well known throughout the County of Marin for his 
fairness and courage portrayed in his conduct in conduct- 
ing his court. He has won high favor among the police 
officers of the county and he is always alert to protect the 
interests of the police department and the community, 
and at the same time gives every defendant a fair and 
square trial. He does not tolerate any tomfoolery in his 
court room and presides with a stern hand, and all of his 
decisions are tempered with mercy. 

Judge Helmore has lived in Marin County for some 
36 years and has been a civic leader and has worked for 
and has endorsed many of the civic improvements which 
make Marvelous Marin such an ideal place in which to 
live. 

District Attorney A. E. Bagshaw paid Judge Helmore 
a tribute which truly reflects the qualities of the judge. He 
stated, "Judge Helmore is a man of character, honesty, 
integrity, and proven ability." 



Police Judge Guy Ciocca 
of San Rafael 



Police Judge Guy Ciocca is a refutation of the old say- 
ing that "a man is without honor in his own community." 
Born in San Rafael June 22, 1908, he has been given 
plenty of honors during his lifetime by the people of his 
city and of Marin County generally. 

After attending San Rafael high school he went to the 
University of California, getting his A.B. in 1931 and 
graduated from Boalt Hall law school of U. C. in 1934. 
He figured his home town was a good place to practice 
law so he opened offices there and has been doing very well 
ever since. 

He proved such a good lawyer that in 1937 he was 
elected Police Judge, and has held that position, with 
others, from that date. 

Judge Ciocca has not been satisfied with just his elected 
job; he has applied his talents to every form of civic 
activity, and especially in the war effort. He is executive 
director of the housing authority of Marin County, and 
in this capacity has rendered grand assistance to the 
Marinship housing project. 

He has taken an active part in the work of the Marin 



Peace Officers' Association and the Marin Rod and Gun 
Club. He is also a member of the Elks, Druids, Rotary, 
and Native Sons of Golden West, and in these organiza- 
tions he is a most helpful worker. 

In the discharge of his judicial duties Judge Ciocca gives 
to each case before him careful study and he has been 
warmly commended for the able and fair manner he dis- 
poses of his calendar. Particularly is he mighty popular 
with those officers who have occasion to bring defendants 
into his court. He gives intelligent attention to both sides 
of an issue, and, being well grounded in the law, his de- 
cisions are conclusive. 

Phone M. V. 2 86 

MILL VALLEY MARKET 

Delicatessen - Fruits - Vegetables - Groceries 
Poultry - Wines - Liquors 

118 THOCKMORTON AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone M. V. 55 

JAMES RUSSELL 

Authorized Dealer 
"BUICK" - Bendix Home Laundry - Norge Products 

18 E. BLITHEDALE AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, VMS 



Chief of Police James F. Doyle of Sausalito 



For many, many years, Sausalito, one of the most pic- 
turesque little cities on the Pacific Coast, has boasted of 
its swell setting and of being strictly a residential com- 
munity, with a haven for boating lovers and a scenic 
setting unmatched anywhere. 

Well, about a year ago this was changed. With a fixed 




Chief James F. Doyle 
Sausalito Police Department 

population at that time of some 3,800 contented men, 
women and children, the residents woke up one day to 
find upward of 10,000 moving in as residents in the city- 
limits or in areas nearby, and 22,000 people working in 
the big W. A. Bechtel Shipyard, Maddens, and other 
yards of less capacity furnishing a few thousand more. 

None saw better than Chief of Police James F. Doyle 
what this great increase in population promised in the way 
of law enforcement. 

No community had ever had such an instant growth, 
and he knew that crime problems would result that would 
call for everything his small force could bring forth, but 
he was prepared. 

He had only five men a year ago, but he has been able 
to add two more and expects additional help as the prob- 
lems grow. Yet, through the aid of two-way radio, he has 
done his share to handle the situation in a manner that has 
attracted the admiration of those who have watched Sau- 
salito grow in the past year. 

He realized there was likely to be a lot of men seeking 
employment in the shipyards who were not free from a 
criminal record, and he recognized the fact that these men 
should be quickly classified if they got out of line in their 
new habitat. Therefore, he decided the best way would be 
to have an up-to-date criminal identification bureau, one 
well equipped to handle the many cases expected, and 



which have materialized. He needed a suitable man for 
the position and was fortunate in getting the services of 
Cornelius J. McCann, a licensed attorney with many 
years' experience in criminal investigation and identifica- 
tion work, and who immediately proceeded to install the 
first Bureau of Investigation of any Marin County city. 
Here is to be found everything needed to carry on this 
important work, and complete files are on hand of many 
criminals, exchange being made with the FBI and the 
California Bureau of Investigation. Stolen cars from the 
eight western states are cleared through Chief Doyle's 
bureau, and he works in close harmony with the National 
Auto Theft Bureau, as many "hot" cars find their way 
around the shipyards. 

Chief Doyle, who has been a member of the Sausalito 
Police Department for eight years, was born in San 
Mateo, and had a brother, the late Chief Doyle of Daly 
City. Prior to joining the Sausalito Department, he was 
with the Northwestern Railroad as a member of their 
police force. 

Traffic is one of the greatest problems of Chief Doyle, 
for the number of cars passing through the town to and 
from the Bridge at the changes of watches creates a real 
matter for solving. But to date he and his men have kept 
the long lines moving and reduced congestion to an abso- 
lute minimum. 

Besides the chief and Sergeant McCann, the following 
are members of the department: Officers Glenn Lewis, 
Jesse O'Brien, George Miller, Homer Morgan, and 
Alfred Girolo. 

Phone Sausalito 149 

MARIN HARDWARE STORE 



664 BR1DGWAY 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Pho 



2812 



Compliments of 

HOME MARKET 

Quality Meats 



FRANCHIN1 & SBRACIA 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone M. V. 217 



MRS. T. F. CAPRIN, Prop. 



LOG CABIN CAFE 



Good Food 

139 THROCKMORTON AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone DElaware 2770 



RAFFO & RAFFO 

Wines and Liquors - Imported and Domestic Groceries 
Fruits and Vegetables - Meats - High Grade Poultry 



398 TEMPLETON AVENUE 



DALY CITY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone Sausalito 975 Open day and night 

NITE-HAWK CAFE 

Excellent Food - Best Service in town - Reasonable Prices 

SAUSALITO CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

LOUIS E. FOSTER . . . Kentfield Drugs 

KENTFIELD CALIFORNIA 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Chief J. McGowan of Mill Valley 

You would have to ride a spry horse over a lot of ter- detail under the chief are able to give the maximum in 

ritory to find a spot like Mill Valley and in which there service. 

were so many contented people. With big redwood trees Chief McGowan is another prominent in the affairs of 

right down to the city streets, with winding drives through t he Marin County Peace Officers' Association. 





Chief J. McGowan 
Mill Valley Police Department 

beautiful gardens, and verdant hillsides, Mill Valley is 
just about as swell a spot one could want to live in. 

Its population has been for years made up of a lot of 
commuters who work in San Francisco, and those who 
furnish the business of the little sequestered city. Until the 
war came along, swelling the inhabitants, numerically, of 
Marin County, things went along in a regular peaceful 
way. Then the shipyard workers came flocking to the 
north Bay area and they sought homes and places to reside 
in Mill Valley, as they did in other sections of the county. 

This called for extra work for the police department, 
but Chief of Police J. McGowan, for some six years head 
of the department, and his small force have met the call, 
and they, as they have been for years, are giving the people 
who reside in Mill Valley police service second to no other 
small city. 

Chief McGowan for a number of years was a member 
of the Sausalito Police Department, and three years of this 
time was chief of police. However, he liked Mill Valley, 
and on February 1, 1937, took over that town's de- 
partment. 

His is a community so situated that a criminal has two 
strikes on him from the start should he decide to do a 
little window lifting or other forms of larceny. Chief 
McGowan and his officers furnish the third strike should 
they succeed in their nefarious endeavors. You read of but 
little crime in Mill Valley, for the town is completely 
patrolled, and, with the aid of two-way radio, the small 



JUDGE GEORGE CORWIN 

OF FAIRFAX 

Judge George Corwin, police judge of Fairfax, was 
born in Columbus, Ohio, 46 years ago, but back in 1910 
he came west and has resided in this state ever since. 
The only interlude was while he was in the army serving 




Judce Georce Corwin 
Fairfax 

with the AEF over in France during the World War I. 

From 1924 to 1938, Judge Corwin served with the 
California Automobile Association, as insurance adjuster 
and subrogation attorney. In 1938 he resigned this posi- 
tion with the Auto Club, and entered the general practice 
of the law in Marin County. He still maintains his office 
in the Tamalpais Theater Building in San Anselmo. 

He was graduated from Lincoln University with the 
degree of LLB. He got his license in 1930. Since 1935 he 
was conciliation commissioner for the United States Dis- 
trict Courts. He was elected judge of Fairfax in 1940. 

He takes his judicial position in a serious manner, and 
gives justice in a fair and impartial manner. He is well 
liked by all peace officers, and has proven a substantial 
member of the Marin County Peace Officers' Association. 

With his wife he lives in Manor, and they await the 
return of their two sons who are members of the U. S. 
Navy. 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



James Mansfield Lewis, Marin County's 

Radio Technician 



James Mansfield Lewis attended Marin County 
schools and graduated from Tamalpais Union High in 
1924. For the next ten years his work included telephone 
switchboard installation, regular electrician, and con- 




Jas. M. Lewis 
Marin County Radio Technician 

ducted own radio and electrical business, being associated 
with several internationally known radio manufacturer... 

In 1934, he joined the San Anselmo Police Department 
as a patrolman and radio technician. The Town of San 
Anselmo was one of the pioneer cities to use two-way radio 
for their police and emergency services. 

In 1940, a radio committee from the Marin County 
Peace Officers' Association convinced the Board of Super- 
visors of Marin County that a county-wide two-way radio 
system was necessary to increase police efficiency and pro- 
tect life and property. 

Lewis was appointed chief technician to draw up plans 
and specifications. Bids were called for parts and equip- 
ment. Construction started in May, 1941, and KSRC 
went into service the latter part of October. 

The nine incorporated cities of Marin are tied in with 
KSRC with two-way equipment in their police and emer- 
gency vehicles. At the present writing over 40 two-way 
units, together with many one-way cars are in service. An 
automatic repeater radio station is located on Mt. Tamal- 
pais to relay messages back from the cars. With this 
unit cars are worked from 50 to 100 miles from San 
Rafael. 

Emergency gas engine generators are installed to auto- 
matically take over in the event of failure of the com- 
mercial power facilities. 

A 150-watt portable transmitter, KEZB, is also ready 
for service in the event anything should happen to KSRC 



or if necessary to have communications at a scene 
operation. 



of 



CHIEF WILLIAM V. NICHOLSON 

OF LARKSPUR POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Chief William V. Nicholson, for twenty years Chief 
of Police of the Larkspur Department, is the president of 
the Marin County Peace Officers' Association. A charter 
member of the organization, he has done much to place 
that organization in the fore front in bringing closer CO' 




Chief Wm. V. Nicholson 

operation among the peace officers of Marvelous Marin. 

Chief Nicholson is well versed in parlimentary proced- 
ure and his handling of the monthly meetings causes them 
to be run off in a well regulated manner. 

Not only is he a chief from the standpoint of enforcing 
the laws, and bringing malefactors to the bars of justice, 
but he takes a leading part in all activities of Marin 
County, and particularly in Larkspur. There is nothing 
of a civic nature that escapes his taking part and his 
knowledge of the county and of its people makes him well 
qualified in helping out in these instances. 

He believes there is some good in most offenders ar- 
rested for committing of crimes, and he is noted for his 
interceding for those who might be steered in the right 
course. 

Few peace officers are more familiar with the duties of 
a police officer or as an executive, and Chief Nicholson 
justly merits the confidence of his townspeople in retain- 
ing him as the head of their police department for twenty 
years. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



Robert P. (Bob) Tracy, Oakland's New Chief of Police Is 
an Ex-Cow Puncher, Bronco Buster and Carpenter 

By B. S. Sanders, Veteran Police Reporter of the Oa\land Post-Enquirer. 



It was a toss up in March, 1916, whether Bob Tracy 
would become a mail carrier or a policeman. 

He had taken both civil service examinations, after 
laying down his carpenter's tools, influenced by a police- 
man and a postman, both his neighbors. 




Chief Robert P. Tracy 
Oakland Police Department 

Results of the police examination came in first and 
Oakland's new Chief of Police Robert P. Tracy became a 
patrolman on March 10, 1916. 

The "rookie" was assigned to Central Station under 
Captain J. Frank Lynch, lately retired, and also a former 
police chief. 

Today after twenty-seven years Bob Tracy is boss of 
Oakland's police department of 400 men in and out of 
uniform. 

And that is a far cry from the days as a mere lad and 
into early manhood when he punched cattle, broke broncos, 
wandered from one great ranch to another throughout 
Wyoming and Montana. 

But it was that experience during those early days on 
the ranges of the cattle country that Bob Tracy acquired 
a quiet, low-spoken voice (no one has ever heard him raise 
his voice above ordinary conversational tone) . 

It was that training that gave him vision and under- 
standing of his fellow men. 

That vision and understanding is reflected in his ordi- 
narily mild blue eyes but which talk with command in and 
out of police work when occasion requires that his voice 



remains low and pleasant. 

He remains inscrutably calm under fire and at all times 
— the way of a man who has spent many years in high 
hills, in the sagebrush country, in the land of cattle. 

Chief Tracy was born July 19, 1887, on a farm in 
Kansas. At the age of five his parents moved into Wyom- 
ing, later following through into Montana. 

Early in 1910, with a cowboy pal, Tracy who had the 
wanderlust, found himself in Denver. There a New 
Mexico cattleman offered him a good job on a big cattle 
ranch. , 

"But," says Bob, "We had never seen an ocean so my 
pal and I decided to go to California. We had a few 
dollars, result of our cowboy days, and shortly we landed 
in Los Angeles. We were there two weeks but neither 
one of us could land a job so we decided to go north to 
Oakland. I knew a family there and my pal also had 
friends in the city. 

"Well, we saw the ocean and to see more of it, came 
up from Los Angeles on the S. S. Harvard which had 
just been put on the Los Angeles-San Francisco run." 

The young men landed in Oakland and Tracy found 
his friends. It was at this time he took an offer as car- 
penter, having had much practical experience in his cattle 
ranch days where a cowboy was a general handy man 
whether to build a corral, a fence or a house. 

For the next few years he worked at the trade, became 
a member of the carpenter's union, carrying his card until 
he decided upon police work as his career. 

It was at this time he met his neighbors, Al Nelson, 
Oakland police officer, and a mailman, and decided to 
take both examinations. 

Thus Tracy was appointed patrolman, March 10, 1916. 

Four years later he was promoted to the inspector's bur- 
eau, September 15, 1920, as an assistant. 

He became a full inspector on April 5f, 1924. 

Fourteen years later on February 1, 1938, he was made 
lieutenant of inspectors. 

On August 8, 1940, he was promoted to the position 
of captain of inspectors. 

And then came his appointment as Chief of Police, 
April 1, 1943 — this year, succeeding Chief Bodie A. 
Wallman. 

Bob Tracy has the respect, the admiration and the 
friendship of every man in the department. 

As an inspector, Tracy worked on every detail in the 
bureau. For some time he worked as partner with In- 
spector Richard V. McSorley, since retired. 

It was while McSorley 's partner that the famous Vir- 
ginia Clark murder case arose, the woman having been 
charged with the murder of her husband, a street car 

operator. ,„ . ~ n . 

(Continued on page -V ) 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 1943 



g San Francisco 




*=° PEACE OFFICERS 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS* ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

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ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 , 



HERE IS A TIP ON BIKE RIDING 

The curtailment of automobiles, tires and gasoline has 
increased the number of bicycles in use by more than a 
million since 1940. ... A poll of some 40 cities just com- 
pleted showed bike registrations up 18 per cent. 

While the bicycle has grown into long pants, its riders 
still look upon it more as a toy than a vehicle. Bicyclists 
apparently don't realize that they can get into the same 
kind of trouble on two wheels or four wheels, and that the 
bike is a vehicle subject to virtually the same traffic laws as 
the auto. 

We urge every pedal pusher to heed well the following 
rules: 

1. Obey all traffic laws, signs and signals. 

2. Ride at the extreme right of the street WITH traffic 
— not on the left facing it. Don't zig-zag. 

3. Ride single file — never two or more abreast. 

4. Keep both hands on the handlebars. Don't stunt or in- 
dulge in horseplay. 

5. Never hitch a ride on another bicycle. 

6. Carry packages in a basket, or attached securely to the 
bike where they will not interfere with steering, pedal- 
ing or vision. 

7. Never ride double or carry a passenger on the handle- 
bars. 

8. Keep your headlamp and rear reflector in good work- 



ing order if you ride at night. A rear light is better 
than a reflector. And, by all means, have a horn or 
bell on your bike — and use it. 
9. Use ARM SIGNALS when turning. 

10. Dismount and walk across busy intersections. 

11. Take it easy, and be more careful than when driving 
an automobile. A bike is certainly no match for a car. 

12. Remember — your bicycle is subject to the same gen- 
eral traffic rules as an automobile — obey them. 

— Kentucky Peace Officers' Magazine. 



THIS MAN WANTED BY U. S. SECRET 
SERVICE 

Nick Medich, alias Nick Madich, alias Paul Lucas, U. S. 
Secret Service No. 1327. His description is as follows: 

White; alien Serbian; 47 years; five feet eight inches 
tall; 175 pounds; brown eyes; dark brown hair with tinge 
of grey; speaks fair English. 

His fingerprint classification is: 

1 U 110 6 Ref: 1 U 



1 aT 10 1 aU 

The above-described man is wanted by the United States 
Secret Service who will pay a reward of $250 for informa- 
tion leading directly to his capture. 

He served a term at Leavenworth Penitentiary from 
1933 to 1940 where he learned the shoemaker's trade. He 
was sentenced in Federal Court at Minneapolis in 1925 
to 18 months in Leavenworth for violation of the National 
Bankruptcy Act and to 12 years in Leavenworth by the 
Federal Court in Duluth in 193 3 for possessing and pass- 
ing counterfeit $10 and $20 gold certificates. He was ar- 
rested November 29, 1942, at Fargo, North Dakota, for 
attempting to pass a counterfeit $10 Federal Reserve note 
at which time he had $900 worth of these notes in his pos- 
session. He was sentenced December 10, 1942, to 14 years 
and while en route to Leavenworth, in the custody of a 
Deputy U. S. Marshal, he escaped at Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota. 



GOOD ADVICE FOR 

ALL POLICE OFFICERS 

The following was received from Assistant Chief of 
Police Fritz Kaminsky, Bureau of Operations, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. : 

'We have been requested by the Office of Civilian De- 
fense to do all possible to combat sabotage, and to that 
end William T. Ingram, Assistant Sanitary Engineer, 
has asked that all officers of the Department on their 
regular tour of duty will demand identification of repair 
crews working on telephone or power lines, or in man- 
holes in the street leading to telephone or power cables, 
or sewers, or working around water department pumps 
or water mains, or fire plugs, unless the crews are per- 
sonally known to the officer to have business working on 
the particular job. 

"Please be governed accordingly." 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



ANDREW (ANDY) PERI 

Andrew (Andy) Peri was the first policeman in Fair- 
fax, the first chief of police, and, when appointed, was the 
youngest chief of police in California — just 21 years 
of age. 



CHIEF OF POLICE OLIVER J. OLDFIELD 

OF BELVEDERE 

If you have ever driven through the flowers and shrub- 
lined streets of Belvedere you would never think they 
would need any law enforcement officers, so peaceful and 



But titles and honors rest lightly on Peri's broad contented are its people. In such a surmise you would be 




Chief Andy Peri 
Fairfax Police Department 

shoulders. In addition to his arduous duties as protector 
of society, he is also Fairfax's tax collector, truant officer, 
road superintendent, pound master and health officer. 
Quite a bit of work for any man, but Peri manages to get 
through it all in fine shape, and have plenty of time for 
adding to his large list of friends. 

Bad gunmen from Arizona do not come to Fairfax any- 
more. One, Casey Jones, by name, got tough with Peri in 
an alley in 1926. In fact, he got quite desperate. He pulled 
his big, bad six-gun and blazed away at Peri. This made 
Peri angry, so he walked up to Casey Jones, and, with 
his hefty right hand, knocked him for a "loop." And Casey 
went for a rest in a nice big jail. 

Knocking hard guys on the chin is all in the day's work 
for Peri. For four years he was welterweight champion 
of the Olympic Club in San Francisco. During his reign 
as champ he met and defeated many tough hombres. 

Peri also has a knack for life-saving. His most unusual 
feat along this line was pulling two drowning boys from 
angry waters . . . and Peri not able to swim ! 

Peri does not drink, and keeps in fine physical shape. 
He was born on Telegraph Hill, in San Francisco, edu- 
cated in San Francisco and Marin County schools. He's 
been a paper carrier, shipyard worker, and deputy consta- 
ble, among other things. He has been the support of a 
family of seven for years, has a charming wife, and a home 
of his own. 

"I wouldn't live anywhere else than in Marin County 
if they made me Governor," he said recently. "I always 
call Marin County the 'Happy County'." 




Chief Oliver Oldfield 
of Belvedere Police Department 

recording right. They don't need a police force in the 
manner of other cities, mostly because the chief they have 
has been on the job 21 years, and he has served all that 
time with one assistant, and he having been on that job 18 
years of the 21. 

And if you knew the philosophy of Chief Oliver J. Old- 
field of Belvedere you could readily understand why that 
Eden-like community jutting out on a peninsula that gives 
the most magnificent marine view to be found anywhere 
on this troubled earth, has not had a severe accident, a 
tragedy or a serious crime in over a generation. 

Chief Oldfield believes the time to start crime preven- 
tion is in the young boys and girls of his town, and as ad- 
visor counsellor for these youngsters he has, during the 
past two decades, given them advice that has made good 
citizens of them. There isn't one of them he has seen 
grown from childhood to manhood or womanhood that he 
couldn't instantly give his heartiest endorsement and 
conscientious recommendation for a position in any walk 
of life. He has given these on many occasions and has 
never been let down. A fine tribute to the understanding of 
a man holding such a responsible position as chief of 
police. 

According to Chief Oldfield, no city could have finer 
cooperation from its people as he has received from the 
residents of Belvedere, and especially, he declares, the 
councilmen, of which there have been many during those 
21 years he has headed the police department, have never 
failed to back him to the fullest extent in his administra- 
tion. During his long tenure, Chief Oldfield has missed 
but two meetings of his boards of councilmen. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



SAN ANSELMO 

(Continued from page 7 J 
appointments in attempting to convince the Board of 
Supervisors and the City Councils of eight other incor- 
porated cities that this equipment was essential for modern 
law enforcement was rewarded when the service was put 
into operation just in time to cope with the present emer- 
gency, and to the many law enforcement officers of the 
county, he is known as the "Father of Police Radio." 

Chief Wood is an authority on civilian defense, having 
made an exhaustive study of this subject since March of 
1941, when he was appointed Marin County Coordinator 
for the Fifth District, comprising the nine Bay counties, 
of the State Council of Civilian Defense, Law Enforce- 
ment Unit. Through a year of intensive classes of instruc- 
tion he has recruited and trained eighty-four supplemental 
and auxiliary police, organized into seven squads with lead- 
ers and assistants using radio-equipped cars and stationed 
in precincts throughout the city. These men are equipped 
with uniform and stars, and, by reason of their training in 
all fields of law enforcement, are able to actively take 
over police duties in their respective precincts if and when 
the emergency arises. 

Much of the credit for the enviable record that has 
been made by the San Anselmo Police Department goes 
to the assistant chief, Captain G. D. Vickery, who joined 
the department in 1930, and, through the ensuing years by 
diligent work and study, elevated himself to his present 
rank. Captain Vickery is an authority on ballistics and is 
in charge of all firearms practice. He is also in charge of 
the Junior Traffic Patrol, the efficiency of which is due 
to his personal interest in the welfare of the citizens of the 
community, particularly the men and women of tomorrow. 

Next in command is Lieutenant S. N. Serio, who came 
to the department in 1939 after nine years' service with 
the Fairfax Police Department. The balance of the per- 
sonnel, in the order of their seniority, are: Officers G. 
McLaughlin, P. Fahey, G. Anselmi, and E. Harrington. 

Of the men who have studied police science under Chief 
Wood for the past thirteen years, T. Lynch is now with 
the California Highway Patrol, C. Voigtlander in the 
U. S. Navy, J. Lewis is county radio technician, J. Wad- 
dell in national defense work at Marinship, and J. Meuser 
is chief of police at Corte Madera. 

To these men and the present personnel of the depart- 
ment, the chief of police owes the success for the present 
high standard of law enforcement in San Anselmo, for 
they have all lived up to the mottos of the department: 
"One for All and All for One" and "Eternal Vigilance 
is the Price of Peace." 

Phone 2444 S. A. 

GREETINGS TO THE OFFICERS 

San Anselmo Court House Creamery 



Opposite the City Hall 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Belvedere 175 GEORGE MORRIS, Registered Pharmacist 

MORRIS PHARMACY 

Drugs - Films - Prescriptions - Cosmetics - Candies 
TIBURON CALIFORNIA 



THE FRIENDLY STORES 

WESTERN HOME FURNISHERS 

Complete Home Furnishers 

5 STORES 

SAN ANSELMO, SAN RAFAEL, NAPA. VALLEJO, MARTINEZ 

Phones: Office 4080, Res. 5110 

A. VON ROTZ 

Contractor and Builder 
40 GREENFIELD AVENUE SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 

Phone S.A. 2555 OSCAR SCHE1BE 

OSCAR'S TIVOLI CAFE 

556 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 

Phone S. A. 5060 

CAIN & JONASEN TIRE SERVICE 

RECAPPING 

20 GREENFIELD AVE. SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Phone Belvedere 3 7-J BILL BARR 

BELVEDERE GARAGE 

Taxi and Bus Service 

TIBURON, Marin County 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Anselmo 5686 DONALD C. PERRY 

SUNNYSIDE NURSERY 

Home of Distinctive Plants, Sprays, Fertilizers, Garden Supplies 
130 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Phone S. A. 5848 

BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Variety Store Merchandise - 5-10-15 Cents and Up 

OPPOSITE FIRE HOUSE SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Phones: Store 3072-M. Res. 3072-J 



BEN JOHNSON 



TAMALPAIS ELECTRIC CO. 

San Anselmo and Kentfield - A Large Stock of Electric Fixtures 
568 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Phone San Anselmo 2906 LOU REESE 

LOUIE'S INN 

62 7 SAN ANSELMO AVENUE SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

BONAITI 8C ZUVINNI 

SAN ANSELMO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2 743 

MEAGOR'S PHARMACY 

Next to Tamalpais Theatre 
SAN ANSELMO CALIFORNIA 

Phone S. A. 34 7 7 

GEORGE GREGORY 

Contracting Painter 
554 REDHILL AVENUE SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

HOTEL ANSELMO 

339 SAN ANSELMO SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Editor Boothe of San Rafael Independent Backs Marin 
Peace Officers* Association 



As to what a newspaper can do to making the difficult 
work of law enforcement easier, and extend a helpful hand 
to those men charged with the security of a community, 
we refer our readers to the San Rafael Independent, and 
particularly to its editor James R. Boothe. 

From the earlier days of its formation the Marin Peace 
Officers have had the earnest cooperation of Mr. Boothe. 
As editor of Marin County's only daily newspaper, he has 
proven his ability in fostering those principles that have 
made the country newspaper one of the most potent agen- 
cies for the upbuilding of our country. He is recognized 
as one of this area's most competent newspapermen, with a 
background of long experience in newspaper work, not 
only in his adopted county of Marin, but in San Fran- 
cisco, Sonoma and Contra Costa counties as well. He has 
worked not only in the editorial end of this fascinating 
calling, but in the advertising and business end as well, so 
he is well grounded in all phases of the profession. 

When the Marin peace officers undertook the organiza- 
tion of their association, and Editor Boothe found he was 
welcomed to give a helpful hand he soon proved a most 
valuable force. He desires, as does all other law abiding 
citizens of Marvelous Marin, to have a peaceful, law re- 
specting county, and he was quick to realize that by the 
coordinating of the various police agencies the best results 
to this end would be accomplished. He entered into all 
discussions of policy and gave constructive advice and 
criticism on each program proposed and his suggestions 
were given serious attention, and in most instances fol- 
lowed through. 

Being deeply interested in the welfare of the people of 
Marin County he used his talents to set forth the achieve- 
ments of the Association, and has given every support in 
sponsoring the cooperation in all activities of the organi- 
zation. 

He faithfully tends the monthly meeting and has in- 
spired the complete confidence of the members, who admire 
him for his unreserved frankness in discussing issues pre- 
sented at these meetings. 

Editor Boothe was born in Chico, but received his early 
schooling in Petaluma, and while attending the high school 
of that famed poultry raising city started his newspaper 
career as a reporter on the Petaluma Argus. 

Later he became editor and manager of the Concord 
Transcript and after this phase of his progress was for 
eight years editor of the Gazette in Martinez. 

He had a five-year twirl in newspapers in San Francisco 
and then returned to the Gazette in Martinez as editor 
for another six-year term. Marin County always appealed 
to him, and as all newspapermen long to own their own 
paper he got hold of the San Anselmo Herald which he 
operated until 193 J. From here he went to the San Rafael 
Independent as advertising manager and a year after as- 



suming this position was made editor of the paper, which 
he is still holding down. 

He is a member of the Sigma Delta Chi, professional 
journalism society, Stanford chapter and for two years was 
chairman of the California Newspaper Publishers Associa- 
tion's midsummer editorial conference at Stanford. 

It is regrettable that more newspapers do not get behind 
the peace officers' organization of their respective cities and 
counties. Mr. Boothe sets a fine example of what they all 
should do. 

Phone KEllog 4-5432 



UNIVERSAL TIRE CO., Inc. 

FRANK J. LORENTHAL 



1700 EAST I2TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 6861 



HOGAN LUMBER COMPANY 



SECOND and ALICE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



STAR HOG CO. 



BEST OF STOCK 



COLMA 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 429 



JOHN KRAUSE, Owner 



"BOWL for VICTORY" 

EIGHT MAPLE LANES 
Complete Fountain Service 

Open Every Night 6 P.M. to I 2 P.M. 
Sundays I P.M. to 12 P.M. 

Phone for Reservations 

70 GREENFIELD AVE. SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J une , 1943 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman J. Schwandt, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the NCPCOA on April 8 was 
arranged for by our host, J. M. Lewis, and was held at San 
Quentin Prison. Luncheon preceded the meeting at Trav- 
elers' Hotel in San Rafael. After lunch we left in a group 




Officer Herman J. Schwandt 

for San Quentin where J. M. Lewis had made arrange- 
ments with Warden Duffy for a tour of the prison which 
proved to be very interesting. A letter of thanks and ap- 
preciation has been sent the Warden. 

After a tour of the prison, President George K. Burton 
called the meeting to order in the prison recreation hall, 
where our host, Warden Duffy gave us a short talk on 
radio communication for the prison. 

Lieutenant Lindsay E. Eaton reports that the original 
emergency plans have been changed. Captain James M. 
Rogers spoke on control of the state highways for move- 
ments of combat troops through rural areas in emergency. 

McMurphy spoke on cooperation of all departments to 
establish a frequency favorable to all departments. 

George V. Tudhope of the Oakland Electrical Depart- 
ment, requested a change of frequency from 30.580 Key. 
for mobile units for reason of second harmonic interference 
by other stations. Motion by Lewis and carried through 
that 31.780 Key. frequency be allotted to Oakland Police 
Department for mobile units. 

City Manager Erwin Dames, of Pacific Grove, re- 
quested a frequency for mobile unit. 30.580 Key. was 
allotted. 

Communication was read from FCC at Washington, 



D. C, on shortage of Radio Telephone Operators. 

Don Hossack stated that C. H. P. motor units are li- 
censed with KADJ and can be recognized by car number 
and operator only. 

Professor L. Reukeme of the University of California 
said a few words. 

Chief Walter J. Wisnom reported that he now has his 
license for an emergency transmitter. 

Members present were as follows: Geo. K. Burton, 
Sheriff's Office, Martinez; Herman J. Schwandt, Police 
Department, San Jose; Carrol Messier, Sheriff's Office, 
Martinez; Frank E. Winters, Police Department, San 
Francisco; James M. Lewis, Sheriff's Office, San Rafael; 
Walter J. Wisnom, Police Department, Hillsborough; John 
J. Hartnett, Police Department, Burlingame; Chas. B. Mc- 
Murphy, Sheriff's Office, Oakland; Don B. Caples, Police 
Department, Piedmont; Henri Kirby, Police Department, 
San Jose; Henry L. Bogardus, Police Department, San 
Francisco; H. M. Watson, Police Department, Richmond; 
Manuel M. Trinta, Police Department, San Mateo; C. L. 
Collins, Police Department, Redwood City; D. Carter; 
General Electric Co., San Francisco; Donald T. Wood, 
Police Dept., San Anselmo; Captain James M. Rogers, Sig- 
nal Corps, San Francisco; Lieutenant Lindsay E. Eaton, 
Signal Corps, San Francisco; Mott J. Brunton, Link Com- 
pany, San Francisco. 

Visitors present were as follows: H. Woodworth, 
Radio Department Man. Co., San Rafael; Ray E. Solstad, 
Hamilton Field; Captain Fred J. Logshall, M. P., San 
Rafael; W. V. Pflaum, Police Department, Piedmont; 
L. Reukeme, Professor, University of California, Berkeley; 



Telephone 820 



J. N. MANGIN, JR. 

REAL ESTATE . . . INSURANCE 



23 1 EL CAMINO REAL 



M1LLBRAE. CALIF. 



Phone DElaware 1525 



J. SCHELLINO - S. PASSANTINO 



JOHN'S GROCERY 



Imported and Domestic Groceries - All Kinds of Italian Sausages 

Fresh Ravioli and Tagliarini Daily - Quality Wines 

928 GENEVA AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HIgate 8768 

NOBLE COMPANY 

NOBLE BATCHERS 



I860 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Frank MaUasich, Police Department, San Francisco; Geo. 
V. Tudhope, Electrical Department, Oakland; J. J. 
Keane, General Electric Co., San Francisco; Lloyd F. Mc- 
Kinney, Police Department, Berkeley; G. W. McNutty, 
Redwood City; R. W. Meade, Redwood City; Don Hos- 
sack, C. H. P., Bay Bridge, Oakland; E. S. Nasche, C. H. 
P., Sacramento; E. N. McKee, C. H. P., Sacramento; Vern 
Dwelly, C. H. P., Sacramento. 

May Meeting 

The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at the 
South End Rowing Club, Foot of Hyde Street at the Bay, 
in San Francisco, May 13, 1943. Our host was Frank 
E. Winters, who arranged for a real Cioppino dinner as a 
special treat, at 12:30 P. M. This was prepared by the 
members of the San Francisco Police Department ; namely, 
Inspector Joseph Lippi; Inspectors George and William 
Stanton, both midgets; John O'Keefe and George Brady 
of the San Francisco Examiner. Entertainment was also 
furnished by the San Francisco Police Department, con- 
sisting of several numbers — music by Frank Mascarelli — 
songs by Owen Fogarty. 

President George Burton called the meeting to order at 
2:00 P. M. 

Chief Louis Belloni of South San Francisco was granted 
clearance on the following frequency: 1. Station Trans- 
mitter 1674 Key. — Power 50 Watts. 2. Portable Mobile 
Units— 30.980 Kcy.-FM. 

The following names were passed by the Board of Di- 
rectors and accepted as regular members of the associa- 
tion: 

J. Donald Hossack, Frank McKinney, Everett J. McKee, 
Geo. V. Tudhope. 

Sheriif A. A. Ross of Eureka is requesting a change of 
frequency from 2422 Key. to 1610 Key., also a mobile fre- 
quency. Before this can be granted, Sheriff Taylor A. Day 
of Lakeport and Sheriff Harry L. Patterson of Santa Rosa 
will have to give clearance. 

McMurphy, Winters, and Collins spoke on priority of 
equipment for WERS. A motion was carried to the effect 
that a letter be sent to WPB asking for a reason why the 
Police Department can't get any priorities on equipment. 

McMurphy spoke on monitoring KPO for radio silence, 
facilitating the use of an extra receiver of 6.80 Keys. 
Lieutenant Lindsay E. Eaton is to confer with the Fourth 
Intercepter Command in regard to changing Key-Moni- 
toring to 1658 Key. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:45 P. M. after Henri 
Kirby requested the June meeting for San Jose. 

The following members were present: George K. Bur- 
ton, Edward Bertola, Henry Bogardus, Lieutenant Lindsay 
E. Eaton, Ray Gada, John J. Hartnett, Mott A. Brunton, 
Henri Kirby, Lloyd F. McKinney, Chas. B. McMurphy, 
Geo. Maxey, Jim Ruys, Frank E. Winters, Herman J. 
Schwandt, Walter J. Wisnom, Herbert Becker, C. C. 
Collins, W. H. Harrington, J. Don Hossack, Ivan Hudson, 
Jim M. Lewis, Merrill LeBoeuf, E. H. McKee, Manuel 
Trinta, Opie Warner and Donald T. Wood. 



Phone RAndolph 9975 



BAYSIDE MOTEL 



IN SAN FRANCISCO 



2011 BAYSHORE BLVD. 
At Hester near 1 hird Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone Millbrae 441 

MILLBRAE HIGHLANDS PHARMACY 



301 EL CAMINO REAL 



MILLBRAE, CALIF. 



Phone 542 

QUALITY BAKERY AND LUNCH 

ALL KINDS OF ROLLS - CAKES - PIES - PASTRY 
HO-MADE BREAD 

NOVATO. CALIFORNIA 

THE VILLAGE INN 

SANDWICHES - FINE LIQUORS - BOTTLED GOODS 
Lydia E. Quarg 

NOVATO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Novato 862 

LILLIAN'S 

Arthur and Betty 

We Carry All the Best Liquors - Refreshments - Dance 

Scotch - Rye - Bourbon - Gin . . . Only the Best 

HALF MILE SOUTH OF NOVATO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 491 George Le Fevre - C. F. (Red) Cannon 

THE RECREATION PARLOR 

George and Red's 

Where All the Boys Meet . . . Beer - Liquors 

Tobacco and Soft Drinks 

642 - 4TH STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Phone San Rafael 4595 

McDonnell's (Deluxe Service) Auto Court 

RADIO EQUIPPED COTTAGES 
4 Miles North of San Rafael, Calif., On 101 Highway 

30 MINUTES TO SAN FRANCISCO 

Belmont 13 16 

BELMONT FRUIT JUICE CO. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLE JUICES 



I 120 EL CAMINO 



BELMONT, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS FROM 

STANDARD HOG CO. 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone: 93 - Res. 632 



NOVATO FEED & FUEL 

H. M. Stout, Prop. 

GARDEN SEEDS - POULTRY REMEDIES 

NOVATO, CALIFORNIA 



CARLSON'S 

SANDWICHES ... ICE CREAM . . . TOBACCO 

101 HIGHWAY, LEADING TO HAMILTON FIELD 
CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes of 

HOTEL SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 

George T. Thompson, Manager 
POWELL AT SUTTER STREETS SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 802 I 



Open 24 Hours 



JOE FRANZELLA 

FRUIT MARKET . . . FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
The Best for Less 

300 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone DElaware 7438 



G. Bertucci & Sons 



BOUOUET FLORISTS 

CORSAGES AND WEDDING BOUQUETS - FLORAL DESIGNS 
Plants of All Kinds - Free Delivery 

STATE HIGHWAY COLMA. CALIF. 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



HERMAN J. SCHWANDT 

Herman J. Schwandt was born in Tutz, Germany. His 
folks came to America when he was four years of age, 
settling on a farm in Delaware County, Iowa. There he 
obtained part of his grammer school education. At the 
age of 11 years he quit school to work on the farm and 
help support the growing family. When he was 16 years 
old he took up carpentry and served a four-year appren- 
ticeship. 

In October, 1914, he enlisted in the U. S. Army, was 
sent to Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and in December was 
sent to China, where he became a member of the famous 
Hth U. S. Regiment stationed at Tientsen. While off duty 
he furthered his education by studying coures in automo- 
bile work and electricity through the International Corre- 
spondence School. He was stricken with a severe attack 
of scarlet fever, and while convalescing, was given the 
assignment to help build the army wireless station. Equip- 
ment was from Cavite Wireless Station at Manila, and 
was of odds and ends parts of discarded equipment; all 
that was to be had to build a new station from. The men 
had to build their own Quince Spark Gap and finally 
made a workable station out of nothing. Later Mr. 
Schwandt became one of the station operators. 

In October, 1918, he returned to the United States 
with a sergeant's rating and was stationed at Camp Fre- 
mont, where, as a member of the Provost Guard Company, 
he became familiar with army police tactics. When the 
armistice was signed he returned to Iowa. He spent a 
year working, remaining a member of the U. S. Reserve 
Army. The United States Government abolished the 
Regular Reserve Army in June, 1920, and Mr. Schwandt 
obtained an honorable discharge at that time. 

In December, 1921, he came back to California and set- 
tled in San Jose. He applied for and received naturaliza- 
tion papers, proud to be a United States citizen. 

Mr. Schwandt joined the San Jose Police Department in 
August, 1922. He has been in several close gun fights, 
and miraculously escaped death twice. He has arrested 
several of the real "bad boys." He was a member of the 
San Jose Police Pistol Team of 1928-29, which retired 
undefeated and unbeaten, having made a score of 295 out 
of a possible 300 at 25 yards and shooting at a 2-inch 
bullseye target with a regulation service pistol. He pre- 
viously earned "expert rating" with pistol and rifle while in 
the army. He was always interested in radio work and 
spent many a spare hour assisting the broadcasting of 
record music at the original KQW studios on South First 
Street in San Jose when it was owned by Professor Her- 
rold. He has been night operator of KGPM, San Jose 
Police Radio Station for the past four years, and has been 
instrumental in the setting up of the stolen car and filing 
card system at the station. 




HENRY'S BAR AND RESTAURANT 

218 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. SAN ANSELMO. CALIF. 

BAY CITIES SANDBLASTING CO. 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



4356 CLEMENT STREET 



Phone KE. 3- 1432 



JOAQUIN PERRY - CHAS. SCHMALE 



IDEAL CABINET SHOP 



Built In Fixtures 



1010 38TH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A FRIEND 



Phone DElaware 2143 

WM. J. SWEENEY 

CITY JUDGE 

CITY HALL DALY CITY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone TEmplebar 7781 



S. GIUNTINI 8c SON 



Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 



1003 5TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: HIghgate 2479 - Res. TEmplebar 3024 Carl Bersch & Sons 

BAY CITY CABINET COMPANY 

Since 1910 - Manufacturers of Bank, Store and Office Fixtures 

High-Grade Cabinet and Church Work, Etc. 

1076 FIFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

GEANNE and LEE WEBER 

ST. MARY'S TAVERN 

Hot and Cold Lunch Served All Day - Choice Liquors 
Cocktails - Tap Beer 

3845 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

RAY T. DAMI, Pprop. 

NEW CAPRI 

Chicken Dinners - Lunches 



950 5TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 525 

SAN BRUNO CUT RATE 

Tobaccos - Wines - Liquors - Free Delivery 

542 SAN MATEO AVENUE SAN BRUNO. CALIFORNIA 

Phone MArket 1213 Free Delivery 

L. GALTIE French Cleaning 8C Dyeing Works 

339-347 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone TEmplebar 7738 



M. SMITH, Prop. 



ROYAL JUNK YARD 

We buy Scrap Iron, Raffs, Sacks and Metals of all kinds 
304 MARKET STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone SAusalito I 7 I 

JOE'S GROCERY 

Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 
633 BRIDGEWAY BLVD. SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone ELkridge 3949 H. S. HUBBARD 

MISSION RIDING CLUB 

Special Rates for All Day Picnics and Moonlight Rides 
Free Instructions - Horses Boarded 



Corner LISBON and HOFFMAN 



COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Mission 9345 MME. J. GENTILLET. Prop. 

LAFAYETTE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

2977 TWENTY-FOURTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



MARIN PEACE OFFICERS' ASSN. 



This writer had the pleasure of attending the meeting 
of the Marin Peace Officers' Association held in the Dor' 
mitory Cafeteria of the Marin Federal Housing Project at 
Sausalito. The members of the association were taken 
through all the buildings of the project prior to the meet- 
ing, and with Judge Ciocca, was given a description of the 
undertaking. The quarters for single men were gone 
through and the number of men occupying the rooms 
about fill the total. The homesite for married couples and 
for larger families were given a close observation and it 
was explained how the renters of these premises got not 
only a furnished home with utilities but receive medical 
attention for the members of the family for the price of 
the rental. 

The playgrounds for the children were also examined 
and there were found everything from which the youngster 
could get constructive enjoyment. 

The largest school in Marin County is nearing comple- 
tion on the project. 

The members and guests were then seated in the banquet 
hall of the Dormitory Cafeteria and the Manager Carl En- 
fendelt placed before the diners a dinner that was a rare 
treat indeed. 

The business meeting of the association was transacted 
with President Chief W. V. Nicholson, of Larkspur and 
Secretary-Treasurer Judge John R. Flor presiding. 

Steuart R. Stimmel, field representative of the Federal 
Security Agency of Health and Welfare Service, gave an 
enlightening lecture of the work being done by his agency 
in the control of social diseases. 

Judge Ciocca was given a vote of thanks for his part as 
host of the meeting and all expressed their enjoyment of 
how the project at Marinship was being administered. 

Those present at the meeting were: Walter Lendman, 
San Rafael; Chas. E. Neils, Larkspur; R. P. Elder, Lark- 
spur; Harold W. Elliott, San Rafael; Jules W. Aubur- 
ham, Deputy Sheriff; J. M. Lewis, Radio Technician; Art 
Fellows, San Rafael; J. S. Waddell, San Anselmo; C. J. 
Chulsen, San Rafael; Judge Geo. A. Corwin, Fairfax; 
James Moore, Deputy Sheriff; Richard Todt, San Rafael; 
F. R. Meddagh, Deputy Sheriff; Sgt. C. J. McCann, Sau- 
salito; G. E. Lewis, Sausalito; Chief James F. Doyle, Sau- 
salito; Fred C. Nave, Novato; Judge Guy A. Ciocca, San 
Rafael; Church Dutton, Larkspur; Milen C. Dempster, 
Marin City; Judge F. J. Crisp, San Anselmo; Frank Kelly, 
San Rafael; Dr. E. David Akers; Merritt B. Webster, 
Marin City; First Lieutenant Alan M. Moses, Fort Baker; 
H. E. Guzman, Sausalito; Thos. C. Cheetham, San Quen- 
tin; W. Fusselman, Supervisor; James Boothe, Editor San 
Rafael Independent; Opie L. Warner; Judge John R. 
Flor, Larkspur; Chief Donald Wood, San Anselmo; H. E. 
Duncan, Chairman, Dormitory Council; President W. V. 
Nicholson, Larkspur; G. A. Carbine, C. H. P.; Judge 
Paul Helmore, Sausalito; Sgt. Vernon Divelly, C. H. P.; 
N. J. Smith, C. H. P.; Alvin Johnson, C. H. P.; Harvey 



Price, C. H. P.; J. J. Agnew, C. H. P.; W. F. Wegner, 
Larkspur; Church Dutton, Larkspur; Gerwin C. Egbert, 
Deputy Sheriff; George R. Lawson, Deputy Sheriff; K. E. 
Hawkins, N. W. P.; Dave Zero, C. H. P.; Paul Stevens, 
Belvedere; C. J. Bush, N. W. P.; G. W. Seaton, Corte 
Madera; and Leavitt Baker, Deputy Sheriff. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



DINWIDDIE CONSTRUCTION CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



W. 8c J. SLOANE CO. 

FINE FURNITURE 

224 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone DOuglas 5 188 

ISLE CAPRI RESTAURANT 

Famous for . . . BONELESS STUFFED CHICKEN WITH RICE 

550 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone GArfield 3000 

GREETINGS TO OUR FINE POLICE FORCE 

VICTOR EQUIPMENT COMPANY 



844-854 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone 2006 



Established 1916 



W. H. GIBBONS - Insurance Agency 

REAL ESTATE AND NOTARY SERVICE 

10 LA CRUZ AVENUE MILLBRAE, CALIF. 

HIGHLAND CLEANERS 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

George Cantaloub, Proprietor 

Telephone Millbrae 800 
3SS EL CAMINO REAL .- MILLBRAE, CALIF. 

San Mateo 3-5068 - Burlingame 4-1294 
46 NORTH "B" STREET - SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



OLCESE BROS. HOG CO. 



COLMA, SAN MATEO COUNTY 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



California Highway Patrolmen 

SERVING IN MARIN COUNTRY 

The increase in automotive traffic has created a prob- patrolmen, assigned to controlling of the flow of traffic 
lem in Marin County that calls for every officer in the over the various highways of one of the better known 
county and an additional force of California Highway counties of the state. 






Sergeant Vernon Dwelly 



Patrolman David Zebo 



Sergeant Thos. H. Wentworth 






Sergeant Dave Murray 



Patrolman E. F. Monteverde 



Patrolman J. J. Agnew 



MULLER BROS 



Phone M. V. 802 LESTER B. BROWN 

BROWN'S 

Marin's Most Complete Home Furnishers 



Manufacturers of 
CATSUP - PICKLES - CONDIMENTS 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 38 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone DElaway 9498 

MARTEX FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Home of the De Luxe Finish Work 
1163 GENEVA AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MARKET STREET RAILWAY 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



A Large Part of Sausalito's Police Department 







Sergeant C. J. McCann 



Officer Glen E. Lewis 



Officer Jesse C. O'Brien 



Officer G. W. Miller 



Phone MArket 9880 

TRANSPORT MOTOR COMPANY 

DISTRIBUTORS WILLYS MOTOR CARS AND TRUCKS 
San Francisco - Oakland - Los Angeles - Sacramento 

1540 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone CArfield 7755 C. W. Barker, Mgr. 

PACIFIC MANUFACTURING CO. 

M I L L W O R K 

142 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

ROLANDELLI CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



42 5 BROADWAY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

H. R. LAIST CO. 



RIALTO BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



WHEN YOU BUY GILMORE RED LION . . . YOU BUY FROM 
THE INDEPENDENT DEALER 

GILMORE OIL COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



TOLEDO SCALE CO. 



968 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone SUtter 1866 



Distributors Pisa Brand Products 



MATTEUCCI 8c VANNUCCI CO., INC. 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE GROCERS 

Dealers in Wines and Liquors 

Imported Ol've Oils - Cheese - Mushrooms - Fancv Delicacies 

641-642 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

E. J. Willicr Truck Transoortation Co. 

Edward I. Willie. President 

San Francisco - S6S Berry Street, Near 7th, Phone MArk«t 6677 

Oakland - Corner Sth and AdePne. Phone TWinoaks 1477 

Los Angeles - 1655 South Alameda Street, Phone PRospect 1447 



Tel-phone EXbrook 6464 



J. C. Hamil. Prop. 



PURITY SPRING WATER CO. 

PURE DISTILLED WATER 
Spring Water from "Marvelous Marin" County 

2050 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone WEst 0828 



Established 1898 



PIERCE - RODOLPH 



STORAGE COMPANY. LTD. 

lohn S. Currie. General Manacer 

United Van Lines, Inc - Yellow Van Co. 

1450 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Citizen : "Officer, I am now telephoning for definite in- 
formation, and I want no facetious remarks from you — 
understand?" 

Officer: "Please state your question. If we are able to 
give a definite reply we will be very glad to do so." 

Citizen: "I have three lots. My home stands on the 
middle one. I do a little landscape gardening and a little 
so-called victory planting on the two vacant lots. I think I 
am of sound mind. The people on each side of my lots and 
the people in the rear and their droves of kids must think 
I am a little off. I say this for the reason they all watch 
me do my gardening — and they and their kids throws fits 
every time a B B shot hits me in the head. I am quite bald 
and I have never worn a hat in forty years." 

Officer: "I presume you know the names of your al- 
ledgedly offending neighbors, and, under the circum- 
stances, I would suggest you have citations issued for 
them." 

Citizen: "Thanks so much, officer. You know, it is two 
years since one of you fellows gave me the same advice, but 
I forgot the name of the thing I was supposed to ask Matt 
Brady, my good friend, for." 

(Funny, some people will get headaches or almost go 
insane trying to figure out something for themselves 
rather than ask a simple question — but, we must admit 
such timid people are less than one-half of one per cent of 
our population.) 



Phone 924 



Stop and Save 



P. A. (BERT) SINKINS. Prop. 



MOTOR INN 

Hotel, Cottages, Apartments - Cash Grocery - Liquors, Wines, Beer 
2009 BR1DGEWAY. Opposite Shipyards SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



DEPOT GARAGE 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA 



GROCERS MILK CO. 

M. L. SHREVE, Manager 

2264 EAST I2TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



In police reports, descriptions are, sometimes, quite 
nonplussing. How about these two intriguing ones?: 
"Ruddy complexion; black hair; blue eyes; 5 ft. 8 ins.; 
165 lbs; male"; (and his mate with) "Brown eyes; 
blonde; 5 ft. 5 ins.; 118 lbs; female." 

Pretty well matched couple. The above descriptions ap- 
peared on a report describing lost sugar rationing cards. 
But how can sugar rationing cards do even so-called light 
housekeeping? 



Phone VAIencia 9707 



ROSE A. MARCIANO 



LUCKY CAFE 

Chioppino Every Friday - Clam Broth 
2301 BRYANT STREET, Corner 21st SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 4495 - DElaware 2 770 



G. PAGANNI. Prop. 



OLD ST. HELENA WINERY 

Napa Valley Dry W?nes 

400 TEMPLETON AVENUE DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3424 



HENRY CHEZZI'S 



FAMILY LIQUOR STORE 



Free Delivery - Opposite P. O. 

128 TUNSTEAD AVENUE SAN ANSELMO. CAL'F 

Phone 14 14 FRED L. MARTIN 

MOBILGAS SERVICE STATION 

Tires - Tubes - Batteries; Call and Deliver 

No I BLITHEDALE AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 8171 



P. E. CALLOT, Jr. 



WESTERN TRANSPORT CO. 



3014 CHAPMAN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Millbrae 3 161 NELLO TOMMEI. Prop 

MILLBRAE TAVERN 

Dancing - Beer - Wines - Liquors - Sandwiches 

230 EL CAMINO REAL MILLBRAE. CALIF. 



Phone FRuitvale 3034; Res. TRinidad 4427 



JAMES J. EANDI 



EANDI ARTISTIC METAL WORKS 



Residence: 980 Estudillo Avenue 



976 23RD AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone DElaware 9050 



P. O. Box B 



D. GARIBALDI &: SONS 



GARDEN VALLEY NURSERY 

Growers and Shippers of Maidenhair and Asparagus Ferns 
MARKET and FIRST STREETS COLMA. CALIFORNIA 



McKALE'S INC. 

Service Station System 

703 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

DITTO SALES & SERVICE 

MONADNOCK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephone UNderhill 3600 



D. W. Jordan. Branch Manager 



FRUEHAUF TRAILER COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

SIX-WHEEL ATTACHMENTS 

2030 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone Mission 4970 



SMITH GROCERY 

H. K. Smith, Proprietor 

900 • 22ND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

ORTEGA & EMIGH 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone DOuglas 8648 



Charles P. Low, Manager 



FORBIDDEN CITY - Supper Club 

DINNER DANCING . . . ALL-STAR CHINESE SHOW 



363 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CLUB LAFAYETTE 

238 HYDE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL" 7 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



GArfield 9669 

SCHLUTER'S 

SALON OF BEAUTY 

Complete Air Conditioning for YOUR Comfort 

160 POWELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

JAMES A. GRAY, INC. 

BAY BRIDGE TERMINAL BLDG. SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A FRIEND 



"PLAY BALL WITH GUS" 

MILLBRAE CALIFORNIA 

Phone HIgate 9397 S. ALIOTO «c SON 

TOURIST INN 

Sea Food - Crab - Shrimps - Oysters - Cocktails 
1109 CYPRESS STREET. Corner llth OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Higate 5466 



M. KANTOR 



LAKESIDE JUNK DEALERS 



412 MADISON STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF 



Phone South San Francisco 393 

EL CAMINO MARKET 

Staple and Fancy Groceries - Imported Goods 
Fish and Choice Meats 

2 13 EL CAMINO REAL and ORANGE AVE. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephones: MArket 2670 - 2671 Ambulance Service 

ARBURUA AND McINNES 

DOG AND CAT HOSPITAL 

Animals Treated and Boarded 

Dr. los. M. Arburua - Dr. John Mclnnes - Dr. M. Levy 

26 FELL STREET. Opp. Tenth ' SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



THE GOLD RAIL 

18 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

ANDREW WILLIAMS' STORE 

THE BEST FOODS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

SAN MATEO CALIFORNIA 

Phone VAIencia 4060 Res. Phone Burlingame 40625 

A. R. REID CO. 

DISTRIBUTOR HUNT PROCESS CO PRODUCTS 
CONCRETE CUR'NG . . . PIPE WRAPPING 

2600 OAKDALE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



MARK W. ELLIS 

HUMANE OFFICER OF MARIN COUNTY 

In the selection of its humane officer, Marin County has 
been fortunate in getting a man who has the experience 
in dealing with dumb animals. Since 1941 the humane 




Mark W. Ellis 

officer has been Mark Ellis and he has done remarkable 
work in discharging the requirements of that important 
office. 

The number of cats and dogs that are abandoned or 
get lost and which must be fed and an endeavor made to 
restore them to their rightful owners runs into the thou- 
sands each year. Then, too, rescuing cats from trees, sav- 
ing cats and dogs and other animals during flocd periods 
and giving attention to many such animals who need medi- 
cal attention, furnishes additional work for the humane 
officer. In addition to these activities Officer Ellis calls on 
ranches and kennels to see that proper care is given to 
animals of all domesticated species. 

And it must be said that the work is carried on in a most 
thorough manner. 

Mr. Ellis was born in Wisconsin in 1879. At the age 
of thirteen he started in for himself, going in for the lum- 
ber business, and before he was fifteen he was an expert 
lumber grader. He studied at night and became a teleg- 
rapher, and until he was twenty-one was an agent for the 
Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. When he gained his 
majority he decided to come West, and located in Seattle. 
He remained in this city until 1910 when he felt the urge 
to see sunny California, and landed in Marin County, 
getting a job with the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, 
working up to freight and passenger agent at San Rafael. 

He resigned this position and went into the bus trans- 
portation business which he continued until his appoint- 
ment to the humane officer post. 

Mr. Ellis has as an assistant Hazel Wilkins, one of the 
only woman deputy humane officers in the state. She is an 
exceptional horsewoman, and has rendered invaluable serv- 
ice in rescuing horses and cattle in he rainy season. 

She is a director for Marin County of the American 



Red Star, a civil defense organization for the care of ani- 
mals in the event of an attack from our enemies. 

Officer Ellis pays her the splendid tribute of stating she 
shirks from no hardships in any emergency she has been 
called on to render assistance. 

The Marin County Humane Society is composed of the 




Miss Hazel Wilkins 
Only Woman Humane Officer in Stale 

following: George U. Hind, president; George W. Brooks, 
vice president; E. H. Tompkins, secretary and treasurer. 
Volunteer officers : Chester L. Gibbs, W. A. Hellwig, F. L. 
Tainter. Veterinarian: Dr. F. H. White. 



Phone M. V. 1484 



Last Court Before Entering San Francisco 



HILLIARD'S AUTO COURT 

ULTRA MODERN 

101 Redwood Highway - 5 Miles North Golden Gate Bridge 

P. O. ADDRESS MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



STOP AT — 

DON'S MARKET 

For Your Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 
Reasonable prices at all times 



AI5 BR1DGEWAY 



SAUSALITO, CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Phone Sausalito 401 



John Perry Phone TUxedo 9711 Juan Vazquez, Prop. DOuglas 9536 



THE OLD GOLD DUST 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars - Lunch Room 
2 7-29-3 I Caledonia Street Sausalito, Calif. 

Compliments of 

Sausalito Furniture Store 

Sausalito California 

Phone M. V. 1014 H. H. Wilkins, Own. 

WILKINS ALTO AUTO COURT 

Modern Cabins and Kitchens 
Bet. Alto and Waldo - W. Side - 101 Highw. 

Compliments of 

S. LABEL 



1 105 Fourth Street 



San Rafael, Calif. 



Phone S. R. 104 J. P. Bonhag, Prop. 

SAN RAFAEL HARDWARE CO. 

Vacuum Cleaners - Radios - S.-W. Paints 
625-627 Fourth Street San Rafael, Calif. 



Phone San Rafael 8 



Free Delivery 



MEDICO DRUG CO. 

"Dependable Druggists" 

1301 Fourth Street San Rafael. Calif. 

Phone S. R. 597 

FRED CORDONI'S 

SUPER-SERVICE STATION 

Associated Oil Products 

4th St. and Lincoln Ave. San Rafael, Calif. 

Phone Fillmore 3827 Chop Suey-Chow Mein 

BAMBOO INN 

Chinese and American Dishes 

1216 Fillmore St. San Francisco 

Phone MArket 9166 Ed and Jack Holmgren 

GOOD FELLOWS 



305 1 16th Street 



San Francisco 



Phone MArket 6633 

HEALTH STANDARD TESTS 

Excelsior Clinical Laboratory 

2288 Market Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

"SMOKERIE" 

3073 16th Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

HENRY GREEN 



45 Post Street 



Cigars 



San Francisco 



Phones GArfield 304 1 . 3042 

THE HERMAN SAFE CO. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Fire and 

Burglar Proof Safes and Vaults 
Howard & Main Sts. San Francisco 



Max and Joe Diaz 



Jacinto Mexican Restaurant 

Genuine Mexican Kitchen - Established 19 11 
67 Turk Street San Francisco 

Phone Fairfax 1 162-W 

MILANI DELICATESSEN 



Fairfax 



California 



EVergreen 9628 

THE ALPINE 



I 725 Haight Street 



San Francisco 



Phone HEmlock 3573 

QUALITY PIE SHOP 

Wholesale and Retail 



1 06 Germania St. 



San Francisco 



Phone MArket 0487 

THE WHITE PHARMACY 

398 Hayes Street San Francisco 

Corner Hayes and Gough 

BILL'S DELICATESSEN 

Hours 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

Closed Wednesdays 

I 18 West Portal Ave. San Francisco 



PACIFIC BUILDING 



82 1 Market Street 



San Francisco 



COMMODORE COFFEE SHOP 



75 Battery Street 



San Francisco 



BUY WAR BONDS 

Phone MArket 6336 

ARNKE IRON WORKS 

Manufacturers Ornamental Metals and 

Structural Iron - Fire Escapes 

780-786 Brannan Street San Francisco 

VAlencia 7 706 



CLUB BOHEMIOS 

Typical Music and Entertainment 
1216 Stockton Street San Francisco 



O. B. OLSEN'S RESTAURANT 



98 Embarcadero 



San Francisco 



MOntrose 4545 O. Juner, Prop. 

AMERICAN CYCLERY 

Lightweight and Balloon Tires in Stock 
Stanyan & Frederick Sts. San Francisco 

GRaystone 9694 A. Rampendahl 

Majestic Garage and Super Service 
Station 



1381-1393 Post St. 



San Francisco 



SUtter 9502 



A. Maggenti, Mgr. 



L'EMPORIO LUCCHESE 

Gents' Furnishers 
1429 Stockton & 530 Broadway - S. F. Cal. 

SUtter 9898 "Everything Homemade" 

THE MAGIC CUPBOARD 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
127 Grant Avenue San Francisco 



DOuglas 9661 



M. Robinson. Mgr. 



St. Francis Luggage Shop 

Aviation Luggage - Wardrobe Trunks 
140 Powell Street San Francisco 

GArfield 2090 

WAYNE R. MILLINGTON 



Central Tower 



Attorney- at- Law 



San Francisco 



Fred Wunsch, Prop. 



Buy Here and Save 



EL CAMINO GROCERY 



1034 El Camino Real 



Belmont, Calif. 



O. MINTZ 

Hardware and Clothing 
2 06 Third Street San Francisco 

Millbrae 623 Al. Schmidt, Prop. 

THEO DRUG CO. 

Quality Drugs - Prescriptions 
400 Broadway Millbrae. Calif. 



By Appointment Mission 1658 



Emile Gravano 



DR. H. M. GRIMWOOD 

DENTIST 
3993 - 24th Street San Francisco 

WAlnut 9708 

THE HOUSE OF JOY 

1423 Fillmore Street San Francisco 



STOCKTON FIRE BRICK CO. 



Russ Building 



BRYANT TAVERN 

Beer - Wines - Liquors - Boccie Ball Alleys 
2400 Bryant Street San Francisco 

GArfield 9723 - SUtter 9389 Tollixri Bros. 

CHAS. FASHION GRILL 

Lunch and Dinner - Also a la Carte 
243 O'Farrell Street San Francisco 

SUtter 9838 G. Giannini 

COLOMBO MARKET GRILL 

San Francisco 



San Francisco 626 Front Streel 



Phone 259 



MILL VALLEY LUMBER CO. 



"Since 1892 the Best of Everything 
in Lumber and Building Materials" 



MILLER AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



8 LOCUST AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HILL FARM HEALTH CAMP 



MANOR. CALIFORNIA 



Phones M. V. I 144-1 145 



SUEY KEE & CO. 



Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables, Meats, Fish and Poultry 

4 13 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone M. V. 1444 FRED BERR1CK Phone 850 

THE BROTHERS TAVERN 



H. LIEN 

WALHALLA INN 

"The House of Good Spirits" 



C. LANGHOFF 



2 10 BRIDGEWAY 



SAUSALITO. CALIFORNIA 



BUCK 



ARCH 

PASTIME CLUB 



BOB 



"Where You Come in a Stranger and Walk Out a Friend" 

DOLAN'S CORNER BOLINAS AND MILL VALLEY ROAD 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



CHIEF TRACY 

(Continued from page 1$) 
Tracy spent six days on the witness stand. The 
woman was sentenced to life imprisonment in San Quen- 
tin, and subsequently paroled. 

Tracy also as an inspector was largely instrumental in 
unraveling a series of oil fraud cases with several con- 
victions to his credit. 

Oakland's new Chief of Police is married, has a family, 
a married daughter being the wife of John Breen, a Sea- 
bee now in Africa. The Tracy home is at 2852 Seminary 
Avenue. He and Mrs. Tracy also reared, from a boy of 
five years, Donald Graham, a graduate of the University 
of California, married and the father of two children. 

Chief Tracy has been active in church, civic work, and 
in his frateral association as a member of Masonic Blue 
Lodge, Live Oak; Scottish Rite and Ahmes Temple of the 
Shrine. 

He is a member of Pilgrim Congregational Church, past 
president of the Pilgrim's Men's Club of this group; past 
president of East Lake Oakland Kiwanis Club; long active 
as a committeeman in Boy Scout work. 

Chief Tracy is a typical outdoors man. For years he 
and Inspectors Bill Parry and Andy Box, the latter also 
an ex-cow puncher, have gone on annual hunting and fish- 
ing trips. 

"Bob Tracy is a dandy cook, too, as well as a good 
marksman and fisherman," says Inspector Box. 

During his police carrer Chief Tracy has served under 
seven chiefs: Walter J. Peterson, Henry Nedderman, Fen- 
ton Thompson, J. Frank Lynch, James T. Drew, Don 
Marshall and B. A. Wallman. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SAN FRANCISCO HOG CO. 

Telephone Belmont 49 

THE HILLWELL SANITARIUM 



BELMONT 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CORTOPASSI HOG CO. 



56 BISMARCK STREET 



COLMA. CALIF. 



Phone Belmont 40 or 41 

BEST WISHES FROM THE 

ALEXANDER SANATORIUM 

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA 



Duration-ize 
Your Appliances 
With Timely 
airs 



Rep; 



The shortage in home appliances 
is beginning to be felt. This is the 
time of the year new appliances 
are usually exhibited. But appli- 
ance dealers have no new models 
and only a few of the older appli- 
ances are left. 

Dealers, who have the proper 
facilities, are establishing appliance 
repair departments. Appliances are 
not easy to repair these days be- 
cause of the shortage in materials 
and parts. For this reason be sure 
to call in one of the dealers who 
makes repairs if any of your appli- 
ances show signs of trouble. He 
will help you keep your present 
equipment operating for the dura- 
tion. Buy your lamps, lamp bulbs, 
extension cords and fuses from him 
as you need them. 

* 

Don't Fail to Buy 

War Stamps and Bonds 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
bf Cahfornians- 



P T 106-643 



Page 30 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

CONSTABLE MANUEL D. ALBERGI 

OF TOMALES BAY AND POINT REYES 

Manuel D. Albergi, constable of Point Reyes and To- 
males Bay area is a fixture in law enforcement of Marin 



June, 1943 



Phone S. R. 387-W 



DAVID MAY, Prop. 



Union Auto Salvage and Metal Co. 

Scrap Iron Metal and Old Autos Bought 




Manuel Alberigi 
Constable, Point Reyes 

County. Born in that favored spot he has devoted nearly 
his entire life to enforcing the laws of his county. 

The two townships he has represented during the past 
three terms, represents a 250 mile road patrol, and he has 
ably handled his duties with only one deputy, he being 
located at Tomales Bay. 

He served as a deputy sheriff in Marin County for 13 
years, and being a native of that county, and a resident 
of Inverness Park he is familiar with every trail and road 
in the coastal city of the county. 

The laws of the area he looks after sets a fine example 
of what a capable officer can achieve. 

In the World War No. I, he was an aviator in the 
army and is active in the affairs of the American Legion. 

He has given the people of his township 24 hours serv- 
ice a day and that they like him is attested to by the fact 
he has been elected without any opposition three suc- 
cessive terms. 



J^J^^g»»»4r-<W^rJWr»W»<^^ 




^l^&W-'WWWQJVWW-'WVQ 



PLUMBinG 
HEATIIIG* 

SHEET METAb 







CO 



^ Vhont 682 

103-1' d St SiH\K?j&l 

D.KIxxrney."-" 



R. I. BOX 138-D. TOLL ROAD 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Phone S. R. 437 



Compliments of 



North Bay Electric Works, Inc. 



535 FRANCISCO BLVD. BOX 30 SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Pson San Rafael 97 



F. BORDENAVE. Prop. 



SAN RAFAEL FRENCH BAKERY 

"Genuine French Bread Our Specialty" 



1553 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



TACCHI BROS. 

AUTO ELECTRICIANS 
United Motors Service - Electric Auto Lite - Willard Batteries 



1012 LINCOLN AVENUE 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



MARIN CITY 

Extends Greetings and Appreciation to the 

SHERIFF'S OFFICE 

through the courtesy of 

WALDO'S MARIN CITY MARKET 

WALDO C1ACOMINI, Prop. 



H. C. LITTLE BURNER CO., INC. 

Domestic Oil -Burning Heating Equipment - Floor Furnaces 

"Cottage" Units - Circulating Heaters - Furnace Burner Units 

"Utility" Units and Type AC Units for Winter Air-Conditioning 

Conversion Burners - Aquatherm "30" and "60" 

Domestic Water Heaters 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

LUCAS VALLEY DAIRY 



CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS 



NOVELTIES, Etc. 



DON'S FLORIST 

Also: FLORAL DESIGNING, BEDDING PLANTS 



815 BRIDGEWAY 



SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

PINE GROVE HOG CO. 

COLMA CALIFORNIA 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

H. O. Peters 

Division Special Agent Northwestern Pacific Railroad 



Page 31 



With an army background covering 12 years before he 
became division special agent for the Northwestern Pacific 
Railroad 18 years ago, few men are better fitted to hold 
this responsible position than H. O. Peters, with head- 




H. O. Peters 
Special Agent, N. W. Ry. 

quarters in Sausalito. At this time, when the security of 
our armed forces is of such importance when being trans- 
ported from one place to another, Chief Peters knows 
how serious and exacting are the duties imposed upon him. 

Besides being thoroughly informed on all the phases of 
guarding railroad property and that of patrons who travel 
or entrust their freight and express to his line, he is a 
marksman of extraordinary ability. He has more than 200 
trophies he has won in matches with experts from all over 
the world. Prized among medals are those won in a perfect 
50 out of 50 score made in 1936 in the Northern Cali- 
fornia Defense match ; one for winning in the All-Ameri- 
can match for Railway Police in 1938, and the third for 
his part in a four-man team match over the Camp Perry 
Police Course last year. 

His army experience took him to the Philippines, and 
he was for a time stationed on ill-fated Corregidor, into 
Russia, and many other western Pacific ports. 

Chief Peters has a way of imparting his talents as a 
marksman to others, and is in great demand as an instruc- 
tor to peace officers, lecturing to various organizations, and 
he gives ample of his time to the civilian defense work of 
Marin County. He is also coordinator of defense for the 
Northwestern Railroad, a well-formed organization pat- 
terned after that used in larger cities and covering the 
entire system and associate railroads. 

Chief Peters maintains that the most important job 
today in the United States is the safe handling of all mili- 



tary personnel and material by all transportation com- 
panies. 

During his 18 years as Special Agent for the North- 
western, he has handled a large number of cases frcm 
investigating to arresting and prosecuting, and which in- 
volved every form of thief from pickpockets to ma'l 
robbers. 

Chief Peters is a past president of the Marin County 
Peace Officers' Association and has been very active in its 
affairs since its organization, and has been most helpful in 
making it the outstanding body it is today. 



M. l. NUNES 



A. I. NUNES 



NUNES BROTHERS 

GENERAL BOAT BUILDERS AND REPAIRS 
MARINE WAYS 



CORNER SECOND and MAIN STREET 



SAUSALITO, CALIF 



Phone Belvedere 260 



R. L. HOOPER 

Sandwiches - Beer - Wines - Liquors, Etc. 



TIBURON 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 650 



CEORGE LOUIE, Mgr. 



SAUSALITO HOTEL COFFEE SHOP 

SPECIAL LUNCHEON AND DINNER 
Featuring American and Chinese Dishes 



20 EL PORTAL STREET 



SAUSALITO. CALIFORNIA 



LIGHT HOUSE GRILL 

Best of Food - Reasonable Prices 

MATTIE STEWART, Owner 



SAUSALITO 



CALIFORNIA 



EDGAR H. FIELDING 

BLUE FOUNTAIN ALTO 



Bear and Lunches - Soft Drinks 
Ice Cream - Sandwiches 

ALTO, CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

TRAVEL INN HOTEL 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliment of 

EL CENTRO DRIVE-IN MARKET 

On Highway Between San Rafael and San Anse'mo, California 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



ARTHUR H. FELLOW OF MARIN- 
SHIP YARDS 

When Marinship started its sensational work of build- 
ing a shipmaking plant and then breaking records for 
sending big vessels down the ways, they saw they would 




V 



Arthur Fellows 
Marinship Police Department 

need some good men to see that the laws of the land were 
kept about their plant and that peace should prevail. With 
this in mind, one of the first they selected for this impor- 
tant work was Arthur H. Fellows, who from almost the 
time of the first ground-breaking has been on the job. 

In selecting Officer Fellows, Marinship got a man who 
knew what law enforcement meant, and one who had 
plenty of experience in this field of endeavor. 

Officer Fellows, whose home is in San Rafael, and who 
is married, has crammed a lot of experience in his 42 years 
of existence. For eight years he was service manager for 
the General Motors Corporation, then for two years he 
was a deputy sheriff in Yakima, Washington. This job 
gave him a desire to make law enforcement his main work, 
for in 1936 we find him a member of the San Rafael 
Police Department. He must have done good work there, 
for a year later Sheriff Walter Sellmer grabbed him as 
a deputy sheriff, and, until last year, when he went over 
to Marinship, he held an honored record in the Sheriff's 
Office. 

At Marinship he has played an important part in per- 
fecting the splendid police system of the big yards and he 
is well liked by the workers as well as the officials. He is 
a member of the Marin Police Officers' Association, and 
seldom misses a meeting. 



AMERICAN TIRE PRODUCTS 

BOOTS - PATCHES - REL1NERS 
SCRAP RUBBER 



Phone Sausalito 107 



MISS J. PETERSON, Prop. 



LA BLANCHE LAUNDRY 



109 SECOND STREET 



SAUSALITO. CALIF. 



Phone 717 



MEET THE 

QUINN'S 



Mill Valley's Popular Rendezvous - Bar Service - Wines and Liquors 

MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Belvedere 185 



FRED MONTEGANI, Prop. 



THE CORNER MARKET 

Meats - Fruits - Vegetables - Beer- Wine 
T1BURON CALIFORNIA 



Phone 90 



ANNA B. LeROY 



CENTRAL PHARMACY 

We Specialize in Prescriptions 
669 BRIDCEWAY SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

Phone M. V. 119 RALPH H. T1EMAN and WM. DUX 

TAMALPAIS HARDWARE CO. 

30 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 

Phones 888-889 

MARIN FRUIT & GROCERY CO. 

Fruit, Vegetables and Groceries - Wines and Liquors 
605 BRIDCEWAY SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3 15 MARCO MELOVICH 

MARCO'S HOTEL SAUSALITO 

18 EL PORTAL STREET SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

Phone 49 

F. PERRY & SON 

Groceries and Imported Goods - Fruit and Vegetables 
Wines and Liquors 

54 CALEDONIA STREET SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Sausalito 700 

A. ESPAGNOLLE 

SAUSALITO CLEANING & DYEING WORKS 

256 CALEDONIA STREET SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5 I I 

THE PLAZA 

1049 RIDGEWAY BLVD. SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

Phone 615 CHARLIE DUNM1RE 

TEXACO SERVICE STATION 



BR1DEWAY-LOCUST STREET 



SAUSALITO. CALIF 



Phone 185 E. PUHAR1CH - R. W. ROSS 

Sausalito Hardware and Plumbing Co. 

72 1 BRIDGE WAY SAUSALITO. CALIF. 

LOCUST FOOD MART 

Groceries - Wines and Liquors - Fruit and Vegetables 
Quality Meats - Fish and Poultry 

MILLER and LOCUST AVENUES MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Phone M. V. 13 15 

BAYVIEW AUTO COURT 



On 101 Hightway 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



1829 CYPRESS AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



JACOBS AND CRUG 

Tailors - Men's and Boys' Wear - Shoes 
690 BRIDCEWAY BLVD. SAUSALITO. CALIFORNIA 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



HOWARD CLARK — DEPUTY CHIEF 
OF POLICE, LARKSPUR, CALIF. 

Deputy Chief of Police Howard Clark, although 
young in the fraternity of peace officers, is perhaps one of 
the most efficient, scholarly and industrious peace officers 
in Marin County. His willingness to cooperate and his 




Deputy Chief Howard Clark 

industry has won for him a high place in the City of 
Larkspur which he serves so well. 

Deputy Chief of Police Clark comes into police work 
well grounded because, at the age of five, he was taken 
to the San Quentin reservation by his father, who was a 
prison guard. He received his primary education on the 
prison grounds at San Quentin and, by mere coincidence, 
Officer Clark's teachers in grammar school were Mrs. 
Clinton T. Duffy, wife of the present warden, and Mrs. 
Chas. White, wife of the present deputy warden of San 
Quentin. 

Deputy Chief of Police Clark, before entering in to 
full-fledged police work, operated a garage in the City of 
Larkspur, and then turned to the work of a machinist. 
However, for the past several years, he has been a mem- 
ber of the Larkspur Police Department, and, because of 



his ability, he has been promoted to deputy chief of police 
of Larkspur. 

Officer Clark is responsible for the organizing of the 
Auxiliary Police of the City of Larkspur and has per- 
sonally trained and instructed this force consisting of 
some thirty members. He has worked this organization 
into one of the finest working auxiliaries in the State. 
He is one of the best instructors certified by the Office 
of Civilian Defense. 

Compliments of 

THE MILL VALLEY BANK 

The Bank of Friendly Service 
MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phones: Office. S. R. 1550; Res.. S. A. 4093-J 

VICTOR'S MACHINE SHOP 

Manufacturing 

1209 3rd STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

YOUR HOSTS 
at the 

TOP HAT 

JACK ROSS 

CLYDE A. STORER 



MARIN BOWLING 



GRAND AVE. AT FOURTH ST. 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

PAGO PAGO 

First Class Cocktail Lounge 

Service the Best 
303 FOURTH STREET 4403-W 



SAN RAFAEL 



Phone Mill Valley 1 1 1 (Day or Night) 


A. R. BOATES 


EFFICIENT 


GARAGE 


Official "AAA" Roc 


id Service 


EFFICIENT EMERGENCY 


ROAD SERVICE 


TOWING 




A COMPLETE AUTO 


SERVICE 


LOCUST & MILLER AVENUES 


MILL VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



AL GIROLO 

SAUSALITO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Officer Al Girolo of the Sausalito Police Department has 
had a varied experience in police work. Born in Santa 
Rosa he served as a deputy sheriff under the late Sheriff 
Mike Flohr. 




Officer Al Girolo 

He was appointed a State Police Officer to handle inves- 
tigations and complaints of dope being used at race tracks 
on horses and greyhounds. 

He covered all rodeos and county fairs to see that stock 
was not "highlifed," and for the past fourteen years has 
handled the police detail for the San Francisco S. P. C. A. 
under the jurisdiction of the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment. Many cases of wide variety were handled, from 
minor ones to more serious cases. 

He has been in contact with almost every case a police 
officer may encounter. 



OFFICER SYLVESTER D. NOLAN 

Thirty-four-year-old Sylvester Nolan is the "giant" of 
Corte Madera's Police Department. He stands 6 feet 6 
inches and weighs in at 245 pounds. He was formerly a 




Phone S. A. 3868 C. GIORGI 

NEW FAIRFAX BAKERY 

Wonderful Bread (machine made and wrapped) - Cakes - Pastries 
1900 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE FAIRFAX, CALIFORNIA 

Another Package . . . From — 

DON'S 

"Where Everything is The Best" 

158<) SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

TAMALPAIS MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, and Vegetables 
FOURTH AND D STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Phone San Anselmo 2594 Established 1908 

C. R. DeWITT 

Licensed Real Estate and Insurance Broker 



Officer S. D. Nolan 
professional prize fighter and wrestler. Fight fans will 
long remember his one-round knockout (34 seconds) of 
the highly-touted "Tiny" Abbott. 

Officer Nolan has served as sparring partner for two 
former heavyweight champions of the world, Max Baer 
and Jimmy Braddock. 

He has seen ten years of experience as a law-enforce- 
ment officer. 



FAIRFAX 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN F. FRUSTUCK HENRY GROKER. Mechanic 

PARK SERVICE STATION 

Union Oil Products 

85 BOLINAS AVENUE FAIRFAX. CALIFORNIA 

Phona San Rafael 132 1 

MAC CORMACK-TUCKER LUMBER CO. 

Full Line of Building Materials 

805 SIR FRANCIS DRAKE BLVD. SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Wh:n in San Rafael, Vist . . . 

UANY'S KNOTT INN 

The House of 1001 Different Knotts 

92 1 BEE STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



J. C. SMITH 



FAIRFAX 



ALPINE MARKET 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone S. A. 2713 

FRED SPAGGIARI 

Cement Contrator 

Excavating and Cement Work in all its Branches a Specialty 
P. O. BOX 142 FAIRFAX. CALIF. 



Phones: S. A. 4800-4801 



JERRY'S FOOD CENTER 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Meats - Fish - Poultry 



FAIRFAX 



CALIFORNIA 



SAM VELLA SAM OLSEN 

Compliments from 

ANCHOR CAFE 

TIBURON CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

ROSSI'S FAIRFAX TAVERN 



184 BOLINAS ROAD 



FAIRFAX, CALIF. 



Phone 72 7 LESTER S. AYERS. Owner 

FARRIS PAINT & SUPPLY CO. 

Paints - Wallpaper - Blinds - Shades 
1414 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Phone DElaware 344 1 M. BARSOTT1 & PETE LERA 

GREEN VALLEY HOG CO. 

Hog Raiser and Dealer 
159 Station Ave.. Daly City, Calif. Hog Ranch: Colma, Calif. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



EDMUND T. BLUM 

COUNTY PROBATION OFFICER 

Edmund T. Blum was employed as Passenger Director 
of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad and the Santa Fe 
Railway, at the Ferry Building, in San Francisco for fif- 
teen years. 

In January, 1931, he was appointed under-sheriff by 




Edmund T. Blum 

Walter B. Selmer, Sheriff of Marin County, and remained 
in that office until April of 1937, when he was appointed 
County Probation Officer, succeeding the late Thomas 
O'Connor. 

The Juvenile and Adult Probation Office now consists of 
Edmund T. Blum, Probation Officer; Clementina Clayton, 
Assistant Probation Officer and Roberta Harrigan, Deputy 
Probation Officer. 

In 1942 there was a net increase of six juveniles brought 
before the Juvenile Court, as compared with twenty-two 
in 1941. There was a total of 85 adult probationers in 

1941, as compared with 87 in 1942; an increase of two for 

1942. These probationers earned approximately $78,- 
112.74 for the year 1942. 

Collections made through the Probation Office amounted 
to $21,185.46 in 1942, as compared to $17,017.19 for 
1941, an increase of $4,168.29. 

This office has been fortunate in having the full cooper- 
ation of Judge Edward I. Butler, Judge of the Juvenile 
and Superior Court of this County, the various Justices 
of the Peace, Chiefs of Police, the Sheriff's office and their 
staff, and the District Attorney's office. 

Since 1937 the county has built a new Detention Home 
at Lucas Valley. Charles W. Goodwin is the Superin- 
tendent, and his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Goodwin, is the 
matron. 

Compliments of 

DEER PARK VILLA 

JOE and ANTOINETTE 



Compliments of 

ROSSI'S 



TIBURON 



CALIFORNIA 



"BEAUTIFUL" . . . NEIL R. ROSS, Host 

COURT SAN RAFAEL 

Featured in Duncan Hines: "Lodging For a Night" 

NORTHERN EDGE SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Phone 695 MARIN MONUMENT CO. 

A. MAGNAGHI 8C SON 

Memorials - Importers and Dealers in Marble, Granite and Statuary 

1614 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 



Phone S.R. 4397 



E. STALLANO 



REX FAMILY LIQUOR STORE 

We deliver: Beer, Wines, Liquors - "Service Plus Quality" 
1605 FOURTH STREET WEST END, SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Phone S.R. 226 J. B. LAHORE. Prop 

PARISIAN BAKERY 

Genuine French and American Bread - Rolls 
811 B STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

THE GRIDDLE 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



MARK I. FENTON 



"See All the Redwood Empire with Richfield Service" 

THIRD and IRWIN STREETS SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



Phon-s: S.R. 662; Res. 376-J 



D. R. TURNEY. Prop. 



SHIELDS CO. 



Plumbing - Heating - Sheet Metal - Premier Paints 
703 THIRD ST. Near Greyhound Depot SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Phone S.R. 490 PAUL MARY, Prop. 

^LUF RIBRON PASTRY 

We specialize in Wedding, Birthday and Anniversary Cakes 
1327 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Phone 2670 E. H. •'HARVEY" MORRILL 

GRAHAM LUMBER CO. 



S. F HIGHWAY AT "Y" 



SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 



Pho-i- MArket 1858 LEE BAUER E. W. (MONTY) LARSEN 

LEE-MONTY GARAGE 

Towing and Emergency Road Service - Complete Garage and Repair 
Storage Capacity 150 Cars - Scientific Motor Tune-up 



1023 MISSION STREET, near Sixth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone 1140 



CARL O. JONES 



THE SEOUOIA GROTTO 



Family Liquor Store and Bar 
163 THROCKMORTON MILL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 775 Only the Best Foods Served at Our Lunch Room 

ESPOSTTS FOUNTAIN 

Ice Cream - Milkshakes - Sodas - Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 

127 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Phone M. V. 488 

BILL'S SUPER SERVICE 

General Automotive Service - Greasing - Batteries 
Tires - Recapping 

374 MILLER AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone M<11 Valley 434 



BROWNIE MANNING 



FAIRFAX 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN TOWER Restaurant and Auto Court 

5 Miles North of Golden Gate Bridge on Redwood Hi-way U S. 101, 
California 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



Corte Madera Police Department 



CHIEF JAY MEUSER 

OF CORTE MADERA 

Besides being a fine poliee officer, able to meet up with 
any offender, Chief Jay Meuser is an artist of exceptional 
ability. His oil paintings are admired by many who have 
visited his home in San Anselmo, and he received a fine 




Chief Jay Meuser 

letter last year from President Roosevelt thanking him for 
the sketch Meuser drew of our chief executive. 

He uses painting as an avocation, and he has had a lot 
of experience in getting to the top of the list of police 
work, though he has followed his artistic talent since he 
was four years old. He was born in the Mission District, 
and received his education in the Noe Valley district. 

He was a baseball pitcher, and during his 30 years has 
been a vaudeville performer, a sailor working his way 
around the world twice, and was more than a fair boxer. 

However he got married to Dorothy Morris, determined 
to settle down, and we find him as a member of the San 
Anselmo Police Department. Here he proved himself a 
fine officer, so much that a few months ago when there 
was a vacancy for the chief of police job in Corte Madera 
he was selected. As the head of the police department in 
that little city he has the same excellent service record he 
gave in San Anselmo. He was for three years in the police 
service of the latter city. 

He is a firm believer of the enforcement of traffic laws 
and he has no patience for those who violate these laws. 

Chief Meuser believes in giving cooperation with his 
fellow peace officers and is an active member of the Marin 
County Peace Officers' Association. 

At thirty-one years of age, Jay Meuser is the youngest 
chief of police in Marin County. Seven years of his life 
have been devoted to law enforcement. In 1935 he was a 
San Francisco snec'al police officer, then a guard at the 
State Prison at Folsom. In 1939 he returned to the Bay 



Area to become a radio patrol officer in San Anselmo. 
After three and one-half years of invaluable experience 
under the supervision of Chief of Police Donald T. Wood 
of that city, he resigned to become chief of police of Corte 
Madera. 

Chief Meuser, besides his police activities, is an artist of 
note. Among many others, he has executed a sketch of 
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, which hangs in a 
place of honor at the White House, in Washington, D. C, 
for which he received a letter of thanks from the Presi- 
dent. This is one of the chief's proudest possessions. 

Due to the influx of defense workers at Corte Madera, 
Chief Meuser's problems have increased two-fold. Con- 
stant vigilance and a detailed report system, plus coopera- 
tive courtesy on the part of the chief and his force, are 
the psychological weapons employed as an answer to the 
challenge of the law-breaker in Corte Madera. 



OFFICER DONALD E. WENTWORTH 

Don Wentworth is the police commissioner's son. He is 
26 years of age, 6 feet 1 inch tall, and tips the scale at 230 




Officer Don Wentworth 

pounds. He is an amateur wrestler. They don't come too 
big or too tough for young Don, and, on the other hand, 
he has the tact, resourcefulness and integrity of the model 
police officer. Young Wentworth has been a member of 
the Corte Madera Police Department since May, 1942. 
He is rapidly gaining recognition in police circles as an 
able, alert and fearless officer. 

Compliments From 

RED HILL LIQUOR STORE, INC. 

MIL L VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

San Rafael 314 

MME. A. BOUCHE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



1707 FOURTH STREET 



SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



'THE MEADOWS 



Al DeLucchi. Proprietor 
WHISKIES - COCKTAILS - FIZZES 



7 Miles North of San Rafael 



IGNACIO. CALIF. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



POLICE COMMISSIONER THOMAS 
H. WENTWORTH 

Corte Madera's Police Commissioner Thomas H. 
Wentworth is well able to cope with his department prob- 
lems. At 48 years of age, Commissioner Wentworth has 
21 years of police experience under his belt, eight of these 
having been served in his own town of Corte Madera, and 




Commissioner T. H. Wentworth 

the commissioner has seen 13 years' active service as a 
member of the California Highway Patrol. 

Commissioner Wentworth points to his department 
with pride. "The criminal had better stay clear of Corte 
Madera," says Wentworth, "unless he is looking for a 
berth in some penitentiary." 



ASSISTANT CHIEF OF POLICE 
GEORGE S. MENKE 

Close-hand study of the criminal is not new to George 
S. Menke, assistant chief of police of Corte Madera. As a 
young man, 47 years ago, he lived in the village of San 
Quentin, which was just outside of the great walls of 
today's largest penal institution. After leaving this village, 




Asst. Chief Geo. S. Menke 

Menke associated himself with an organization specializ- 
ing in the manufacture of all types of prison and mental 
hospital equipment, thus further broadening his knowledge 
on the habits of both the criminal and the mentally sick. 
Ten years ago he discontinued this line of endeavor to 
take on his present assignment. 



OFFICER FREDD E. WENTWORTH 

Fredd E. Wentworth is 36 years of age. At 16 he first 
entered the prize ring on a career which involved 25 
amateur and 12 professional fights. 

His record was an enviable one. Of his 25 amateur 
bouts Fredd dropped but one and fought three draws. 

Turning professional in 1925, Wentworth won nine 
and dropped but three. 

One of the highlights of his career was a ten-round 
draw in Los Angeles, with "Pat" Lester, then heavy- 




Officer Fred E. Wentworth 

weight champion of the Pacific Coast. Of those present at 
this memorable engagement, there were many who 
thought that Fredd should have been given the nod. 

Wentworth has had varied police experience. He 
served on the guard line at San Quentin Prison for a 
period of four years; he was a special police officer on the 
Golden Gate Bridge for three years, and has also been 
employed as a United States Coast Guard police officer, 
at Marinship, California. 

Fredd joined the Corte Madera Police Department on 
October 28, 1942. 



Phones: Business 206, Res. 234 



C. I. DOWD 



DOWD'S 



Local and Long Distance Moving - Covered Vans - Storage 

157 THROCKMORTON MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Phone M. V. 401 M. ARNAREZ • J. P. ETCHEBARREN 

Mill Valley Hand French Laundry 

Quality and Service at Low Prices 



138 E. BLITHEDALE AVE. 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone M. V. 478 



ERNEST De MARTINI 



TAMALPAIS LUMBER COMPANY 

Grading and Excavating 
DOLAN'S CORNER MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

GRANT'S CREAMERY 

5 74 SAN ANSELMO AVE. SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 

Phone Mission 8885 

SERV-U-STORE 

2750 2 1ST STREET, Corner Bryant SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief John A. Greening, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The April meeting of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' 
Association was held in San Jose, Chief J. N. Black, the 
host. The meeting was held in the St. Clair Hotel banquet 
rooms, and the management served as fine a luncheon as 
is possible to get these rationing days. 

Lieutenant Robert Bartlett, representing General A. C. 
Gillem of the Military Police gave a most instructive lec- 
ture on the training of the men selected for this important 
work in the U. S. Army. He told how the officers selected 
had to meet a higher mental test than in any other branch 
of the service. He went into detail of how the course of 
training made these men familiar with all laws of the vari' 
ous states and nations they might be assigned to police. 

Lieutenant Bartlett stressed how general was the coop- 
eration existing between the civil authorities and the mili- 
tary police. 

President John A. Greening went into detail telling of 
what the police department of the country are facing in 
the way of having their men taken into the armed serv- 
ices of the country. He stated that the International Asso- 
ciation of Chiefs of Police were trying to get a waiver in 
the selective service for police officers, but up to the present 



time nothing had been agreed upon that would solve the 
man shortage in law enforcement. 

The attendance at this meeting was exceptionally large 
and the next meeting was set for Santa Rosa. 

This meeting in Santa Rosa took place on May 28 with 
Chief of Police Melvin Flohr as host. 

Like the San Jose meeting, the attendance was splendid, 
and a fine luncheon was served. 

Senator Herbert Slater, Sonoma County, the dean of the 
State Legisuature was the speaker of the day. He went 
into a discussion of the laws passed, affecting the peace offi- 
cers of the state, at the recently closed legislative session. 

Senator Slater has during his thirty years as a member 
of the legislature, been a dependable representative in the 
matter of espousing laws that make the work of the law 
enforcement officers easier and to work for the defeat of 
those bills designed to make it less difficut for the law 
breakers. 

President John A. Greening of Berkeley and Secretary 
Bernard McDonald of San Francisco, were on hand at 
these two meetings. 

The June meeting will be held in San Mateo, with Chief 
Thomas Burke, giving his usual annual barbeque luncheon. 



Phone GLencourt 3 722 



Compliments of 



CAPITOL MACHINE WORKS 

424 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone FRuitvale 4666 



AUGUST JENSEN 



BAY CITIES FORGE COMPANY 

Marine, Mine and Machine Forging - Steam Hammer Forging 

Heavy Blacksmithing 

1038 23RD AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phones: KE. 2-6226. KE. 2-6227 C. I. SPEER. Mgr. 

ZENITH MILL & LUMBER CO. 

2101 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones: TWinoaks 5543 • Res. GLencourt 63 19 



SAM CLAR 



SAM CLAR COMPANY 



Dealer in Used Machinery and Metals 
495 THIRD STREET, cor. Washington OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone San Bruno 1350 L. I. HEATER - JEANNE HEATER. Mgrs. 

MILLBRAE MOTOR COURT 

"Just Outside of Fog Belt" 

Two Miles So. of Tanforan Race Track 



BOX 136. HIGHWAY 101 El Camino Real 



MILLBRAE. CALIF. 



Phone KEllogg 2-9821. 4-2761 

REX Wholesale Cleaners 8C Dyers 



Wholesale Cleaners and Dyers 



ONEIDA NURSERY 



15 18 E. I2TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Valasco and Acacic Street 
333 ONEIDA AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

F. L. Andres, Proprietor 

TAMALPAIS BILLIARD PARLOR 

13 1 THROCKMORTON AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 

Phone HIghgate 6966 

STANDARD POULTRY COMPANY 

Live and Dressed Poultry 

32 1 CLAY STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

COME ONE— COME ALL— 

EMELY'S PLACE 

2 14 SCHOOL STREET DALY CITY. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF— 

American Bag and Union Hide Company 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 
COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

DALY CITY MACHINE SHOP 

7099 MISSION STREET DALY CITY. CALIF. 



June, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



S. F. WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID 
ASSOCIATION CONCERT AND BALL 

The 1943 concert and ball of the San Francisco Widows' 
and Orphans' Aid Association held in the Civic Auditor- 
ium May 22 was the largest in the history of the associa- 
tion, dating hack to 1878. 

The show presented filled the auditorium, and public 




Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald 

address systems relayed the vaudeville numbers to the over- 
flow crowd, a timely innovation sponsored by General 
Chairman Bernard McDonald. 

During the vaudeville program meritorius certificates 
were awarded to 29 heroes of the police department. 
Mayor Angelo J. Rossi made the presentation. He stressed 
the outstanding services the police officers are rendering 
during this period of war. 

The widow of Timothy Ryan, killed last Spring in a 
gun battle with Glen Warner, was given a posthumous 
award for her husband by President Walter McGovern of 
the Police Commission on the Monday preceding the ball. 
President McGovern stressed in simple words the heroic 
sacrifice made by Officer Ryan, and he asserted the certi- 
ficate would remind Mrs. Ryan that the memory of her 
brave husband would remain fresh in the minds of all 
members of the department. 

Chief Charles Dullea presented prominent men in at- 
tendance, including Governor Earl Warren, who with 
Mrs. Warren joined Mayor and Mrs. Rossi in leading the 
grand march. 

Deputy Chief Michael Riordan, chairman of the pub- 
licity committe, prepared and gave a series of 15-minute 
radio programs donated by station KSFO, and entitled 
"Living Heroes." In these members of the department 
participated, and they included Inspectors David Brady, 
Hunt, Traffic Officer John Riewertz, Inspector William 
McMahon, the most decorated police officer in the United 
States, who has won 14 meritorious awards; Inspector 



Frank McCann, a close second with 9 awards; Sergeant 
Joseph Engler, and Officer Robert Winters. 

Officer George L. Riediger of the Central Station made 
it four years straight for the highest individual sale of 
tickets. This year he beat any of his previous records, sell- 
ing over 2700. He is a member of the Central Station. 




Officer George L. Riedinger 

<won the honors for jelling more tickets to Widows and Orphans 

Concert and Ball. He is here selling a block of tickets to Miss 

Theresa Pinelli, cashier at I'anessi Broadway restaurant. 

Phone RAndolph 9752 

"BOMBO'S BOCCI BALL' 

Pete Brusaca - Dominic (Bombo) Brusaca 
WINE - LIQUORS - BEER - LUNCHES SERVED 

6221 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA FILTER CO. 

981 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

UNITED CIGAR WHELAN STORES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

PAL'S RENDEZVOUS 

George Harvey 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Telephone ORdway 1921 

E. A. CORNELY, INC. 

Leahy Multi-Jet Combination Gas and Oil Burning Equipment 

Enterprise Fuel Oil Burners - Williams Oil-O-Matic Oil Burners 

1452 BUSH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ORdway 6846 

BAUER MANUFACTURING CO. 

DESIGNERS AND EQUIPPERS 

Everything for the Beauty and Barber Shop 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1943 



CAPTAIN JOHN ENGLER SELECTED 

Captain John Engler, San Francisco department secrc 
tary, was selected for the current course of the FBI police 
school. He is the second member of the local police depart- 




Captain John Engler 

ment having been selected for this honor, Criminologist 
Francis X. Latulipe being the first. 

The course, including every phase of police instructions 
is the most comprehensive given in any training course, 
and when a candidate has finished the course he is in pos' 
session of the ability to impart his knowledge to fellow 
officers. 



HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A Particular Laundry For Particular People 

We Handle All Classes of Laundry Work 

3338 Seventeenth Street Phone MArket 1130 



PACIFIC BOX COMPANY 

Wooden Boxes 
Beverage - Specialty - Industrial Platforms 

4901 TIDEWATER AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

ENGINEERING SPECIALTY 

718 DERBY AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

WELDING ENGINEERING CO. 

Welders, Leathers, Helmets and Gloves 
1009 CYPRESS STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

STUART OXYGEN CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

National Glove and Sportswear Company 

209 Clay Street 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Full Line Variety Store Merchandise — Drygoods 
Work Clothes - Dresses 



BENNETTS 



142 THROCKMORTON 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phone 519 



SMITTY'S 



2 14 CALEDONIA STREET 



SAUSALITO. CALIFORNIA 



Compliments from the 

2:00 A.M. CLUB . . . MILL VALLEY 

LOUIS CREYERBIEHL 
MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Phone M. V. 1597 



F. W. CAMBLE 



MILLER AVENUE GARAGE 

Mechanical and Electrical Service 
Body and Fender Repairs - Welding and Painting 



330 MILLER AVENUE 



MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



Phones: Office, 610; Res., M. V. 2I8-J 



Select Used Cars 



C. O. SOLLOM 



Ford Sales Service - Tamalpais Motor Sales 
98 BLYTHEDALE AVENUE MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone Sausalito 502 



SAM GAROFALO, Prop. 



LA VISTA CLUB 

COCKTAILS 
Opposite Old Golden Gate Ferry Slip SAUSALITO, CALIF. 

Phone M. V. 135 1 Dancing, Lunches. Refreshments NEVA BROCK 

BROCK'S MARVEL MAR 

Dinners: Southern Fried Chicken - Charcoal Broiled Steaks 
Roast Ducklings 

4 Miles North of Golden Gate Bridge on 101 Redwood Highway 
ROUTE 1. BOX 997 MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 

Phone Sausalito 45 RUDOLF BUSH MRS. HENRY BRUMMER 

THE BUCKEYE 

Distinctive Dining Room and Cocktail Lounge 

On 101 Highway at Manzanita 



BOX 109. R. F. D. I 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 8104 

ED-COAT PROCESSING PLANT 



San Francisco 7 1 5- 72 I FOURTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



LUCKY STRIKE 

means fine tobacco 



• • • 



So round, so firm, so fully packed . . . 
So free and easy on the draw. 



Phone S. R. 960 



EL CAMINO MARKET 

Opposite El Camino Theatre 



HOTELS AND INSTITUTIONS SUPPLIED 



495 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



Compliments 
of 

FAIRFAX LUMBER COMPANY 



Compliments of 



VAN DER MARLEN CLEANERS 



2138 FOURTH STREET SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 0874 



O. W. BUSSE. Superintendent Phone Hlghgate 4622 



WESTERN FORGE 8c TOOL WORKS 



QUALITY FORGINGS 



LORIMER DIESEL ENGINE CO. 

MARINE AND STATIONARY 



209 JEFFERSON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



SIXTEENTH AND WOOD STREETS 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 1092 



W. H. JAMISON 
OLympic 7981 



S. C. FORSEY. President 



S. F. STOCKUM, Vice-President 



BAY CITY IRON WORKS 



ENGINEERS - MACHINISTS 



EUREKA MILL AND LUMBER CO. 



Incorporated 1 905 



FOURTH and WASHINGTON STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 



HEAFEY-MOORE COMPANY 

344 HIGH STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



3737 SAN LEANDRO STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone TWinoaks 1523 



DINE and DANCE 

JOE CATERA PETER BOSCACC1 

HALF MOON COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



I4TH and CYPRESS STREETS 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



Sec. 56?, P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Permit 3172 



M 



M 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY COMPANY, Ltd. 

ana 

PACIFIC METALS COMPANY, Ltd. 



Vr 



3100 Nineteenth Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 







After the War . . .what? 

Are you planning today for the home you'd like to build 
when this Emergency is over? SAVE NOW for the down 
payment, so that you will be in a position to obtain an 
F. H. A. loan when materials are once more available. 

Call any office of The San Francisco Bank for details on 
how you may own your home when this Wat is over. 

-j» For 75 years an expert in Home Finance ««• 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 1S68 TRUST 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
SEVEN OFFICES . . . EACH A COMPLETE BANK 




NiBpSBMiSli 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 





CHIEF JOHN A. GREENING 

of the Berkeley Police Department 

He is President of the Bay Counties' 

Peace Officers' Association 





OFFICIAL PUBLICATIO 



N 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



***********♦+****+********♦***+**♦***» 



* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

+ 
X- 

* 



ARREST that old Mattress 
get an AIRFLEX 

You'll get deep, luxurious sleep on this sensitive, 
long-wearing mattress . . . and save money too! We 
sell direct to you at the manufacturers' price when 
you buy at our manufacturing store. Save from #5.55 
to #25.50. Mattresses from #10.95 to #49.50. Budget 
terms. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



*••*•**•*•••••*•••*•**••*••*•****•*•*• 



PLAY AND RELAX at... 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks. 

Home of Thrill-Provolcing Rides . . . Unique Restauranfs 
fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 



Compliments of 

YOSEMITE 
BEVERAGE CO. 

150 POTRERO 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Complimets of 

PACIIC OXYGEN COMPANY 

Oakland, California 

• 



Compliments of 

EDWARD BROWN 
& SONS 

Pacific Coast Insurance Genral Agents 

432 CALIFORNIA STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments 



H. MOFFATT & CO. 

3401 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Invest Your Money in War Bonds 
Pay Cash and Save at 

WEINSTEIN'S 

1041 Market 615 Market 119 Post 
100 Market 1620 Polk St. 



For the Best in Radio Entertainment 
Listen to 



KGO 



810 ON YOUR DIAL 



The Blue Network Station 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pagel 



Featured in This Issue 


Page 




3 


By Frank J. Wilson 






5 


By the Editor 




Police Officer Robert Caldwell in U.S. Navy . 


5 




6 


Captain Engler Graduates from FBI Academy 


7 


Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association . 


8 




10 


By B. C. Bridges 




Present Task of Law Enforcement .... 


12 


Northern California Police Communication 






13 


Meritorious Service for S. F. Police .... 


14 


Peter Maloney For Sheriff 


15 




16 




17 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



Directory 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern..... 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors.. Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 
Traffic Bureau Albert S. Munn 635 Washington St. 

Residence - 226 Jules Avenue 
Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 

Bur. of Personnel Lieut. Georce Healt Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Central Capt. M. E. Mitchell. ...63 5 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence - 438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan. Drumm & Comm'l Sts. 

Residence -4075 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 
Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 
Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence- 2533 18th Avenue 
Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 
Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub-Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



wheninTroubie Call SUtter 20*20 

Wlien in DOUbt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



Phone GArfield 8542 

BROOKS 

Equipment Corporation 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Coast Distributors: 

Consolidated Ball Tooth 

Universal Joints 



461 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

National Ice 

& Cold Storage 
Co., Inc. 

OF CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 



SOULE STEEL 
COMPANY 



C V> 



1750 ARMY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY 
COMPANY, LTD. 

and 

PACIFIC METALS 
COMPANY, LTD. 



i 



3100 NINETEENTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



i San Francisco; 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



JULY, 1943 



No. 2 



KNOW YOUR ENDORSERS 

By Frank J. Wilson, Chief, United States Secret Service. 



The United States Secret Service Police, and Post 
Office Inspectors warn you before you accept commercial 
and government checks ask yourself this question: "If 
this check is returned, can I find the person who gave it to 
me?" Demand absolute and positive identification — mail 
thieves and check forgers make poor customers. 

The pen is mightier than the sword and twice as 
tricky. Clever crooks use the pen effectively. The losses 
suffered by victims of the forgery racket cannot be ac- 
curately estimated, but it has been reported that they ap- 
proximate three hundred millions dollars every year. If 
even one-half of that figure is correct, many a quart of 
ink used by forgers has flowed over the dam since the days 
of the quill pen. 

The United States Secret Service, a division of the 
Treasury Department, is charged with the suppression of 
the counterfeiting and forgery of all government obliga- 
tions. All checks issued by the Treasurer of the United 
States are obligations of the government. Thousands of 
them are forged each year, requiring extensive investiga- 
tion by the Secret Service. These forged checks throw a 
heavy load of work on banks. 

Although the number of checks issued by the govern- 
ment is increasing because of Social Security, Army and 
Navy disbursements and other new activities, the forgeries 
of government checks are almost 50 per cent less than in 
1939. But to hold that gain, the Secret Service must be 
more vigilant than ever against this type of crime. There- 
fore, with the full approval of Secretary Morgenthau, it 
is cracking down on the check thief and forger in much 
the same way as it so successfully attacked the counter- 
feiter of United States money — that is, through education 
to prevent the crime. 

By an intensive program in which the Secret Service 
spread educational material through newspapers, maga- 
zines, radio broadcasts, exhibits, and essay contests spon- 
sored by banks, lectures by Secret Service agents, motion 
pictures, and by nationwide distribution of a Secret Ser- 
vice booklet called "Know Your Money," highly satisfac- 
tory results were obtained. In 1937, for example, the 
losses suffered by victims of counterfeit bills totalled 
$519,000, as compared with the $771,000 yearly average 



from 1933 to 1936. As the educational program was in- 
tensified, the losses steadily declined, and for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1942, counterfeit note losses over 
the entire United States were less than $48,000 represent- 
ing a drop of 93 per cent from 1933-1936 yearly average. 

An ounce of crime prevention is worth five pounds of 
crime cure. If education can lick the counterfeiter, it can 
also lick the check forger, and he is another enemy 
against whom the all-out war of the Secret Service is 
being directed. 

The check forger and the counterfeit bill passer have 
one great common denominator. They both depend for 
success upon the ignorance or carelessness, or both, of their 
intended victims. As evidence of that ignorance or care- 
lessness we find among the Secret Service files, reports 
showing that so-called play money, made of thin rubber, 
sold by street peddlers at three pieces for a nickel, has been 
successfully passed as money on retail merchants. In New 
York City the manager of a grocery store accepted and 
cashed a negative photostat copy of a Treasury check — 
black background, white writing, and all. Others have 
accepted checks presented and endorsed by males but made 
payable to females. In 1941 a man posing as a soldier, 
dressed in uniform, travelled half way across the United 
States, operating in the larger cities and cashing checks 
drawn on a non-existent Quartermaster's Bank, U. S. 
Army. The checks were made out on cheap blanks bought 
in a dime store, with headings, amounts, numbers, and 
other information inscribed by a typewriter, and with 
fictitious signatures of the disbursing officer and endorsers 
written by the check passer. He was caught by the Secret 
Service in Kansas City, Missouri. 

In many of these forgery cases magic plays a great part 
— the magic of the name of the government of the United 
States. A crook who steals and forges a United States 
Treasury check figures that his loot is half won because 
so many people believe that a government check is as good 
as gold. And of course it is — provided it's endorsed by 
the proper payee. But a government check can be forged, 
like any other check, and should be accepted with the 
same precautions. 

The Secret Service has made considerable progress in 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



its "Know Your Endorsers" activity to protect Americans 
from being the victims of the check thief and forger. In 
1939 at the instigation of Secretary Morganthau, when 
several million government checks were being issued to 
employees of the Works Project Administration, the 
Secret Service arranged a conference among representa- 
tives of the Post Office Department, the Department of 
Justice, the Work Projects Administration, the Treasurer 
of the United States, and the Disbursing Office in order 
to perfect methods to reduce the volume of check forgery 
cases which had been steadily increasing. As a result, a 
standardized form of WPA identification was issued, and 
bankers and merchants were cautioned to demand this 
identification when cashing any WPA check. We ar- 
ranged to have printed in red ink at the bottom of the 
face of government WPA checks the words: "See Iden- 
tification Procedure and Instructions on Reverse of 
Check," which was one of the most productive steps 
towards prevention of forgery. On the back of the check, 
above the line for the payee's endorsement, is the notice 
"Identification Procedure — When cashing this check for 
the individual payee, you should require full identification 
and endorsement in your presence, as claims against en- 
dorsers may otherwise result." This was the first time 
that a warning printed in color had appeared on a gov- 
ernment check, and it has been most effective in protect- 
ing payees and endorsers, and in reducing the forgeries of 
these Treasury obligations. 

As a new feature of its "Know Your Endorsers" acti- 
vities, the Secret Service in April, 1941, distributed a few 
copies of a small poster similar to the one which serves 
as the title at the beginning of this article. These posters 
were given to a few banks in Texas and became so popu- 
lar that since their origin clearing house associations, banks, 
and other interested organizations throughout the United 
States have reprinted more than 500,000 of them in pla- 
card or circular form for distribution to their depositors 
who are frequently called on to cash checks. Retail mer- 
chants who have received copies from their banks have 
found the posters to be effective reminders of the monetary 
losses they might sustain through careless acceptance of 
forged checks. The original posters have been changed 
to show that the message they carry is a joint warning 
of the United States Secret Service and the Post Office In- 
spectors, for the cooperation of the Post Office Depart- 
ment with the Secret Service is a vital factor in fighting 
the forgery racket. 

With the tremendous expansion of the armed forces of 
the United States has come a corresponding increase in 
the number of checks issued by the government. Compul- 
sory deductions are made from the pay of all soldiers, to 
and including the rank of sergeant, who have dependents. 
To these deductions the government adds an allowance, 
sending the total to the dependents of the soldier, in the 
form of dependents allowance checks, issued under the 
Servicemen's Dependents Allowance Act of 1942. In 
addition to these allowance checks, thousands of soldiers 
voluntarily authorize other pay deductions to be sent, in 
the form of class E allotment checks, to persons named 



by them. Substantially the same procedure is followed by 
the Navy, which also issues both allowances and allot- 
ment checks. The number of checks issued cannot be dis- 
closed, but when you read reports about the size of our 
armed forces, it will readily be realized that they total no 
small figue, and the more checks that are mailed the more 
opportunities there are for thefts and forgeries. 

Until recently all checks issued by the United States 
were printed on light-weight safety paper. However, the 
allowance and allotment checks being issued by the Army 
and Navy are printed on cards which are suited to classi- 
fication by mechanical means in banks and at the Treasury 
Department. 

As a result of the progress made by the conference 
concerning the WPA checks another conference was ar- 
ranged with officials of the War and Navy departments 
and representatives of the Treasurer of the United States 
with reference to the Army and Navy checks in order to 
plan extra precautions to prevent check forgers. The 
Secret Service recommended the printing in distinctive 
type on the face of every Treasury check the warning: 
Know Your Endorsers — Require Identification, and this 
recommendation is to be followed. 

A printed notice is now being prepared to be sent with 
one mailing of all allotment and allowance checks of the 
Army and Navy, informing the payees of the activities of 
check thieves and forgers. The notice will advise the 
payees to be sure their names are legibly written on their 
mail receptacles; to arrange to have their mail carrier 
signal them when checks are delivered ; to cash their 
checks in the same place each month so that identification 
will be easier ; to endorse the check only in the presence 
of the person who is to cash it ; to endorse the check ex- 
actly as it is drawn ; and to notify the Army or Navy 
promptly of any change of address. 

As an added precaution, arrangements have been made 
to have the Army and Navy allotment and allowance 
checks mailed in envelopes bearing this wording: 
TO THE POSTMASTER— If the addressee 
is deceased or the letter cannot be delivered as 
addressed, or if forwarding order is not on file 
with the carrier, it should be returned to the 
sender immediately with the reason for return 
endorsed thereon. 
This means that if the payee is not living at the address 
given and has left no forwarding address, the Post Office 
Department cannot furnish directory service and must re- 
turn the check to the office which issued it. The check 
will be held there until the payee is located. 

Army and Navy allotment and allowance checks are 
issued by the War Department and by the Navy Depart- 
ment, but they represent only a portion of the millions 
of checks issued by the government. 

The banks and bank employees of the entire country 
have always been most cooperative with agents of the 
Secret Service in the crime prevention through education 
program and in investigations of various kinds. The 
Secret Service wants to be of assistance to all banks when- 
(Continucd on Page 38) 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

The Candid Friend Says 



Page 5 



Today we frequently hear or read two expressions of 
the same import — "missing the bus" and "missing the 
boat" ; and on each such occasion we feel what a shallow 
imitation they are of what good old Bill Shakespeare said 
about missing the "tide" — and, as a consequence, spending 
the rest of one's life "in shallows and obscurities." 

Our San Francisco Police Department is composed of 
over 1300 men. To become a member of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department calls for a high school graduation 
certificate, plus a minimum stature of five feet nine inches 
and a class A number one in the matter of physical fit- 
ness. As a member of the justly so-called "City's Fin- 
est" the initiation rank is that of patrolman. At the 
present time — due to recent Charter changes — there are 
three grades higher than that of patrolman, viz : Ser- 
geant, Lieutenant and Captain. 

To be numbered amongst the higher brackets is the 
ambition of up-and-coming men in every rank and walk 
of life. In actual life it is somewhat strange to regularly 
find that while promotions bring increased honors and 
emoluments the actual tangible efforts are less. True, the 
responsibility is vastly more, but, all things considered, 
responsibility is, after all, an intangible something and 
the mental creature of the so-called boss. This thing 
called responsibility is greater or less, or non existant, in 
proportion to the ability of the party who assumes it. It 
is their endowed attitude towards responsibility that dif- 
ferentiates between ideal bosses and those who are defi- 
nitely disturbing elements in an organization. 

For twenty-five or more years I have personally known 
the men of the San Francisco Police Department who, 
through competitive examinations, have moved up out of 
the ranks of patrolman and became corporals, or sergeants, 
or lieutenants, or captains. It is quite a feat to come to 
the top in competing with several hundred men in the 
same line of endeavor — especially when these men are 
mentally and physically of a high standard. 

The race is to the swift. The Good Book has always 
been right. 

In the San Francisco Police Department, since 1900 — 
the so-called "Original Charter" birth year — the spoils 
system has not operated. Thus, for over forty years, San 
Francisco has had it's commissioned and non-commis- 
sioned officers come up from the ranks on their own 
power. This fact is probably one of the reasons for our 
San Francisco Police Department being outstanding in 
the entire nation. The commissioned and the non-com- 
missioned groups are truly self-made ; and the rank and 
file feel they are acting under men who, individually and 
collectively, are competent to perform any phase of police 
duty. 

What will the harvest be? Inside of a scant six months 
we will know the names of San Francisco's future lieu- 
tenants, captains — and possibly chiefs, deputy chiefs, cap- 
tains of inspectors and directors. The new list of ser- 
geants will be something to conjure with. 



In the last week of May or the early part of June the 
cream of one of the greatest police departments in the 
United States will sit down — some five hundred strong — 
to prove their claims to promotion in the San Francisco 
Police Department. All cannot lead the eligible list re- 
sulting from a couple of hours on the examination set. In 
the words of the Good Book : the race is to the swift. Yes, 
to the man who has put in the most consistent effort — and 
has put forth this most consistent effort for the longest 
stretch — comes the coveted place on the eligible list. 

There are several laps still remaining before the final 
gun is fired. Get mentally busy. Do some intensive plot- 
ting and planning. The race is not at all over. Relax; 
get yourself together. Around July 4th, 1943, you who 
are today a San Francisco patrolman — and perhaps suf- 
fering from an infferiority complex — may be saying: 
"Here's to the United States and myself — Sergeant 
John Doe." 



FORMER POLICE OFFICER ROBERT 
A. CALDWELL IN NAVY 

Robert A. Caldwell, for 16 years a member of the 
Police Department, being assigned for that period in the 
old Bush and the Northern district, is in the Navy, having 
been given his leave from the Police Department some 
months ago. While he has all the equipment of a sailor, he 
has not as yet hit the deck of a war vessel. He's attached 
to the Train Patrol, with headquarters at Treasure 
Island, and he rides on the Santa Fe train to Barstow and 
return. 

This writer met him on his train detail and it should 
give members of the Police Department occasion to feel 
pretty proud of the way their former pals are hitting it 
off in the armed forces. Former Policeman Caldwell rates 
high with the train crew from the front of the train to the 
tail end and he has a way of giving the utmost in service 
to the men in his charge, being highly respected by these 
men as well as civilian passengers. He never is too busy 
but what he can stop to listen to any request for informa- 
tion from the patrons on his train, and we noted he was 
equally popular with the soldiers who ride along with him, 
though they have an M. P. on the job. 

Bob says he liked the work so well he may not come 
back to the Police Department when the war is over. 



Phone MArket 2915 



W. M. Cowie. Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO PLATING WORKS 

Gold. Silver and Nickel Plating - 26 Medals Awarded 
1349- 5 I MISSION STREET, bet. 9th and 10th SAN FRANCISCO 

DANIEL'S CREAMERY 

HOUSE OF QUALITY FOODS • THICK MILK SHAKES 
GOLD MEDAL ICE CREAM - ITS FRESH DAILY 

Phone Underhill 5534 1 00'/£ Pork Sausage Swiss Pork Sausage 

MISSION PORK STORE 

Choico Fresh Meats of All Kinds - Smoked Meats 

3016- I6TH STREET next to Anglo Bank SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

AUXILIARY POLICE ORDERS 



July, 1943 



It is doubtful if there is any unit of our Civilian De- 
fense that has been better perfected than the Auxiliary 
Police Unit. 

This body of men, who have given unselfishly of their 
time and have served long hours in duties assigned, as 




Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 

well as perfecting themselves in marksmanship and en- 
forcing the dimout ordinance, is under the command of 
Deputy Chief Michael Riordan. The second top man in 
the San Francisco Police Department has this body of 
loyal citizens trained in every form of defense and the 
organization, though not up to the size aimed at by Chief 
Charles W. Dullea and his deputy, Michael Riordan, is 
doing great work in the preparation for an emergency. 

The following is a resume Chief Dullea this month 
issued respecting the Auxiliary Police: 

July 31, 1943 
GENERAL ORDER No. 97. 

In future, when alerts require the mobilization of regu- 
lar and auxiliary police, the following procedure shall be 
followed in assembly points: 

A member of the auxiliary police shall be designated to 
handle the "paper work" in the particular assembly point. 
He shall see that the reporting forms are available and 
that the auxiliary police shall sign their names on the 
form prescribed for them, and that the regular police shall 
sign their particular forms. 

The reporting of the strength of the regulars and the 
auxiliaries at assembly points shall be done by the auxiliary 
policemen assigned to the "paper work." It shall also be 
his duty to see that the form signed by the regular officers 
and by the auxiliary officers are transmitted to the police 
station of his district as soon as possible, but in any event 



not later than 9:00 a.m. of the morning following the 
date of the emergency. 

The foregoing contemplates that because of the frequent 
test mobilizations carried on by the auxiliary police, they 
are better acquainted with assembly point routine matters 
than the regular members who respond ONLY on the 
sounding of sirens, or on special orders, and that the paper 
and telephone work could be best handled by them. On the 
other hand, where police details or assignments are to be 
made, the function is then carried over into the field of the 
regular police training and experience, and all orders and 
assignments should be made by the regular police force, 
as herein outlined. 

It is difficult to prescribe, except in a general way, what 
should be done in emergencies. We do know, however, 
that every emergency presents a new problem and that it 
is only by thoughtful and genuine cooperation that best 
results can be obtained. It is hardly necessary for me to 
report that we are all deeply grateful for the splendid 
services willingly given by men of the auxiliary unit and 
that the utmost courtesy and consideration should be 
shown them by us of the regular police force. 

An excellent booklet has been issued by the auxiliary 
unit in company "I." It is entitled "What To Do on the 
Alerts." 

Company Commanders are forwarded herewith lists of 
locations where details shall be established in respective 
police districts by the Air Raid Warden Service on the 
dates and at times shown (August 7, 1943, to and includ- 
ing August 31, 1943), and one auxiliary or one regular 
police officer from companies affected by this order shall be 
detailed to cooperate. 

The Air Raid Warden Service will handle the issu- 
ance of citations for violations of the Dimout Ordinance 
and the auxiliary or regular police officer shall issue cita- 
tions for the traffic violations in proper cases. 

As heretofore stated, the pattern for our auxiliary 
police enrollment, according to the Office of the Civilian 
Defense, is that we must have on ( 1 ) auxiliary policeman 
in each police district for every two hundred fifty (250) 
people residing therein. 

This office has made a "breakdown" of the population 
(Continued on Page 40) 

Compliments of 

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SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 4030 



S. C. GOTH 



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Sheet Metal Fabricators 



725 POTRERO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones: Bus.: EXbrook4657 CHARLES A. ROBERTSON 

Res.: Fillmore 3704 

ROBERTSON ENGINEERING CO. 

DESIGNING - REBUILDING - PURCHASING 
325 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Captain Engler Graduates From FBI Academy 



Captain John Engler, secretary of the San Francisco 
Police Department and secretary of the Police Commis- 
sion, has completed his course in the Police Academy con- 
ducted by the Federal Bureau of Identification. 

The class Captain Engler was a member of held appro- 
priate graduation exercises and the men who completed 




Captain John Engler 

the 14 weeks' course, which numbered close to 40 men 
from most every state in the Union, were given suitable 
certificates setting forth their studious manner in master- 
ing the various subjects taught at the Academy. 

The Academy is located entirely in Washington, D. C, 
with the exception of the shooting range, which is located 
at Quantico, Virginia. 

The National Police Academy was established in 1935, 
and has since its inception graduated over 800 representa- 
tives from local, county and state law enforcement organ- 
izations. From San Francisco two members of the Police 
Department, including Captain Engler, have taken the 
course as graduated, the first one being Criminologist 
Francis X. Latulipe. 

The graduates return to their respective homes and act 
as instructors to their associates. 

The Academy curriculum includes courses in police 
organization and administration, enforcement and regu- 
latory procedure, investigations, firearms instruction, first 
aid, records and reports writing, technical training, traffic 
problems and wartime police duties. Emphasis is placed on 
teaching methods so the graduates may be qualified to in- 
struct other members of their organizations. 



Captain Engler, on his return from his educational trip 
to the Academy, was loud in his praise for the fine work 
the FBI, under its Director, John Edgar Hoover, is 
doing, not only in the suppressing of the usual run of 
crime, but in the work this great body is doing toward the 
war effort. 

He was in Washington when the FBI celebrated its 
35th anniversary and saw how the organization has 
grown from its infancy to its present place in our govern- 
ment. 



MOJAVE DESERT HAS PLENTY 
OF SOLDIERS 

The editor of this Journal spent a few days in Southern 
California this month. One of the outstanding visits he 
made during his stay was a trip out on the Mojave Desert, 
where he had a chance to see what the U. S. Army has 
done to change the desert picture. In company of Sheriff 
Emmett Shay of San Bernardino and Inspector McCol- 
lum of the Pickpocket Detail of the Los Angeles Police 
Department, visits were made to the air field at Victor- 
ville, the encampments at Barstow, the equipment center 
near Barstow, and the Douglas airfield, where the 
bombers are serviced, and which lies a few miles from 
Daggett. 

The party was entertained by Chief R. E. Edwards, 
formerly of the bunco and pickpocket detail of the Los 
Angeles Police Department and who is out on pension. 
Chief Edwards has charge of the plant protection. He has 
a sizable force of men under him who have been trained 
in every phase of law enforcement and given training on 
the latest methods of protecting various war centers and 
preventing sabotage. 

There may be as many soldiers in the northern part of 
the state, but we can't see how they outnumber the armed 
forces located in Southern California. 



NO. CALIF. DELEGATES TO 50TH 
INTERNATIONAL CHIEF OF 
POLICE ASSO. CONVENTION 

Chief Charles W. Dullea and his wife, Captain of 
Inspectors Bernard McDonald and wife, and William 
Nasser, prominent moving picture theater operator, leave 
August 5 for Detroit to attend the 50th convention, 
named this year as the second War Conference, scheduled 
for August 9, 10 and 11. W. E. Schoppe of the National 
Auto Theft Bureau also was along. 

Chief Alexander McAllister was to be among the 
Northern California delegates, as was former Chief 
James Drew, who hasn't missed a meeting for a quarter 
of a century. 

The conference will be devoted almost entirely to war 
matters, and on the opening day Director John Edgar 
Hoover will make the outstanding speech of the meeting. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Tohn A. Greening, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The June meeting of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' 
Association was held at Coyote Point, San Mateo, with 
Chief Thomas Burke the host. 

This annual meeting sponsored by Chief Burke is con- 
sidered one of the outstanding of any held each year. The 
June meeting was no exception, and as fine a lunch was 
provided, with plenty of refreshment that made those 
attending feel the war was over. 

Chief Burke has a flock of police officers on his force 
who know how to prepare a meal and serve it. The boys 
who put the feed on for this latest occasion were: Inspec- 
tor R. A. O'Brien, Sergeant Trinta, Officers E. Pence, F. 
McDaniell, Zack Whitten and H. Kohnen, and you can 
take the word of every one of the large delegation present 
that they did not let their chief down in the matter of 
quality and quantity. 

President John A. Greening announced there would 
be but little speaking as the visitors were to be taken on a 
tour of inspecting the United States training school at 
Coyote Point following the luncheon. 

This tour was taken after all had finished their feasting, 
Commander R. M. Sheaf, in charge of the school, seeing 
that the members and their guests saw everything that 
was being done to make expert sailors out of the thousands 
of young men assigned to the school. There may be as 
good a school and maybe located in as fine a place as 
Coyote Point, but the visitors felt that they would have to 
be shown where they were. 

Chief Burke was congratulated by nearly every one 
present for the fine program and luncheon he had pro- 
vided, maintaining his reputation for the outstanding 
meeting of each year. 

Those who partook of the feed and program in San 
Mateo were: 

San Mateo — Mayor Claude S. Hirschey, Chief 
Thomas Burke, Judges Aylett Cotton and Maxwell 
McNutt, Supervisor Fred E. Beer, Justice of the Peace 
Hugh F. Mullin, Jr., Municipal Judge Francis W. 
Murphy, Former Mayor F. P. Simmens, Commander R. 
M. Sheaf of the U. S. Navy School at Coyote Point, C. A. 
Gennere, Justin Fitzgeral, J. P. Britt, Harvey Hancock, 
assistant president United Air Lines; Dan Minto, John A. 
Cost, FBI ; Richard T. McAllister, councilman ; C. E. 
Piatt, Inspector R. A. O'Brien, Sergeant Trinton, Offi- 
cers E. Pence, F. McDaniell, Zack Whitten, H. Kohnen. 

Redwood Citv — Judge Maxwell McNutt, Chief C. L. 
Collins. Sherieff James McGrath, Councilman G W. 
McNultv, Councilman Harold F. Anderson, City Man- 
ager Robert W. Mead, County Assessor Martin Flynn. 



Burlingame — Chief John J. Harper, Police Commis- 
sioners Allen F. Hunt and Peter Dahl, Former Mayor 
C. A. Buck, City Attorney I. Karmel, Albert Mapps, 
City Engineer C. O. Longson, John McGrath, Officer R. 
M. Gruneg. 

South San Francisco — Lieutenant Saul N. Ross, Air 
Transport Command ; Fred F. Dawson, United Air 
Lines ; W. M. Tener, manager United Air Lines. 

San Bruno — Chief William Maher, City Treasurer 
Joseph Cunningham, Caesar Martinelli. 

Hillsborough — Chief W. J. Wisnom. 

San Carlos — Mayor Al Sagehorn, Chief Wheeler. 

San Jose— Chief J. N. Black, Sergeant Charles A. 
Murray, Rev. John J. Laferty, Jim Sullivan. 

Palo Alto — Chief H. A. Zink, Sergeant Elmer E. 
Dakin, Sergeant R. D. Fletcher. 

Mountain View — Chief A. H. Excell and Constable 
Chris Madsen. 

Los Gatos — Chief L. L. Feathers, Constable E. O. 
Woods, Marc Jertin. 

Alma — Constable Robert Robinson. 

Sausalito — Chief James Doyle, Sergeant Cornelius J. 
McCann, Fred Perry. 

San Rafael — Chief Frank Kelly, Auditor W. B. 
Wright, City Clerk Eugene W. Smith, Councilman W. 
C. Heroux. 

San Anselmo — Chief Donald T. Wood, Commissioner 
Frank Monte. 

Larkspur — Chief W. V. Nicholson. 

Albany — Inspector William Hydie. 

Richmond — District Inspector Fred A. Leber, Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol. 

Berkeley — Chief John A. Greening, Julian M. Thomas. 

Piedmont — Captain Dan W. James. 

Oakland — Chief Robert P. Tracy and Former Chief 
James Drew. 

Nana — Captain J. B. Critchler, California Highway 
Patrol. 

San Francisco — Police Commissioners Walter Mc- 
Govern, William P. Wobber and Ward Walkup ; Sheriff 
Dan Murphy; Undersheriff Wm. Hollingbery; Comman- 
der H. M. McKinley, U. S. Navy; Lieutenant L. V. 
Palmer, U. S. Navy; Lieutenant Richard H. Hibbard; 
Lieutenant Commander P. H. Overy; George Stinson, 
U. S. Navy ; Assistant Speco-'al Agent Harry C. Van 
Pelt, FBI ; Joseph Murphv ; Assistant District Attorney 
William P. Go' den ; Judge Clarence W. Morris; Don 
Marshall, L''n U or Control Administrator, Board of 
Equalizition ; Sp?cial Agent Austin W. Reynolds, Santa 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Fe R. ; T. Webb; Albert Rhine; Dan Danziger; Milton 
Pilhasy; Rex Leslie; Dr. T. B. W. Leland; J. J. Burke; 
Eugene Broderick, chief A.R.W.S.; Douglas Hayden, 
chief special agent, Telephone Co. ; Chief Special Agent 
J. G. McClelland, Attorney General's office; Chief Joe 
O'Farrell; Inspector John Misterly and R. V. Arm- 
strong, State Narcotic Bureau; Captain Bernard Mc- 
Donald ; Frank Tharp, manager Burns Detective 
Agency; Al Helgoe, Hawaiian S. S. Company; M. L. 
"Jimmy" Britt; Earl McCall, supervising liquor officer, 
Board of Equalization; Jimmy Schmidt; John D. Mc 
Keon, director Civilian Defense; Officer Henry M. 
Schutzer ; Charles Moore, special agent Telephone Com- 
pany; George Griffin, special agent, Attorney General's 
office; and Robert H. Morse. 

The following were elected to membership in the Asso- 
ciation : Jackson D. Baker, San Francisco Bank ; Lieu- 
tenant J. Dwight O'Dell, Commanding Officer District 
Train Patrol, U. S. Navy; Assistant Attorney General 
Jess Hession ; Arthur W. Smith, San Anselmo ; Earl J. 
Smith, supervising Customs Agent ; Commander Benton 
V. D. Scott, Venereal Control Officer, U. S. Navy; Rev. 
Father Eugene Shea, Director of Youth; Anthony J. 
Gazola, Narcotic Inspector; John D. Sullivan, Special 
Agent FBI; Father John Laferty, San Jose; Edward 
Ehman, supervisor Pinkerton Detective Agency. 

The July meeting of the Association was held at the 
Lakeside Golf Club House, with Sheriff Daniel Murphy, 
Vice President of the Association, acting as host. 

There was a splendid attendance of members and 
guests, and this attendance was well worth while, for, 
beside furnishing a splendid menu for the large crowd 
present, Sheriff Murpl.y provided an excellent speaker in 
the person of his son, J. Phillip Murphy, contruction en- 
gineer. More of that later. 

Chief John Greening, President of the Association, 
presided at the meeting. 

In opening the session following the luncheon, he an- 
nounced that Governor Earl Warren had been elected a 
life member at the meeting held in San Mateo. This 
brought a round of applause from his audience. 

Chief Greening reported on the progress in getting 
deferment for law enforcement officers in the draft. He 
said the progress was slow. He pointed out that many 
departments had been lessened by 60 per cent of their 
personnel, while instance were known where a department 
had been hit by 100 per cent of their force. 

He said that a tentative offer had been made by the 
selective service officials deferring police officers with 
three years' service and over 30 years of age. The com- 
mittee working made a counter offer of deferring men 
with one year's experience regardless of age. This was 
refused, and there is now a movement on foot to com- 
promise on a two-year basis. This will be taken up at the 
War Conference of the International Association of Chiefs 
of Police in Detroit August 9, 10 and 1 1. 

The next meeting of the Association will be held in 
September, the August meeting being suspended because 



of the International Chiefs' convention, and Dr. H. M. 
McKinley, morale officer for the U. S. Navy, extended 
an invitation to have the meeting held on 1 reasure Island, 
which was accepted. Warden Clinton Duffy invited the 
members for San Quentin for the meeting that follows. 

Among the distinguished guests present introduced by 
President Greening were Julian Alco, newly-appointed 
Prison Director; James Quinn, member of the East Bay 
district for the Board of Equalization ; Commander Scott, 
U. S. Navy; Lieutenant J. Dwight O'Dell of the Train 
Patrol, U. S. Navy; Lieutenant James English, in charge 
of activities of the Civilian Defense ; and Assistant Attor- 
ney General Hession. 

The meeting was turned over to Sheriff Murphy, who 
expressed pleasure at the splendid turnout. He then in- 
troduced the speaker of the day, his son. He recounted, 
among the minor activities his son had recently engaged 
in, that of putting the mammoth siren atop the old Call 
Building at Third and Market Streets. 

J. Phillip Murphy got the contract for dismantling and 
building a new bridge over the river at Tacoma. 

He told of the construction of this suspension bridge 
that was wrecked, evidently from faulty engineering, and 
of the problems presented in taking the wreckage down, 
not only to safeguard navigation, but to get hold of the 
metal for war purposes. He stated that the strands from the 
26-inch assembly of these cables were being used by the 
convicts at San Quentin to make cargo nets and for sub- 
marine nets in various waters of the world. 

He said the work of dismantling the wrecked bridge 
was finished July 4, after two years working on it, and 
that now with all parts removed he has to wait until the 
war ends before the new bridge will be constructed. 

His remarks were listened to with rapt interest and 
his details of how every problem was surmounted was 
given close attention. 

Those attending the San Francisco meeting were 
among the following: 

Berkeley — Chief John Greening, Julian M. Thomas. 

Oakland— Sheriff N. P. Gleason ; Chief Robert P. 
Tracy; James Quinn, member State Board of Equaliza- 
tion ; Chief James Drew, retired, secretary California 
Peace Officers' Association; Deputy Sheriffs D. L. Webb 
and H. L. Adams. 

Albany — Chief S. C. Williams, Police Commissioner 
B. W. Mowday, Officer Frank Al Regello. 

Burlingame — Mayor Emeriti's C. A. Buck, Chief John 
J. Harper, Police Commissioner Peter Dahl. 

San Rafael — Chief Frank Kelly, Councilman W. C. 
Herup, Auditor W. R. Wright, City Manager Assistant 
J. J. Downey. 

Palo Alto— Chief H. A. Zink. 

Los Gatos — Chief L. L. Feathers, Councilman Bert 
Fresher, and Constable E. O. Woods. 

San Bruno — Chief William L. Maher. 

South San Francisco — Louis Belloni. 

Sacramento — District Inspector E. Steinmeyer and 
Captain C. W. Personius, California Highway Patrol. 
(Continued on Page 39) 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



Supernational Peace Enforcement 

By B. C. Bridges, Supt. Bureau of Identification, Alameda Police Dept. 

(All rights reserved) 



Once again America has been compelled to engage in 
the grim business of war. On this occasion, the necessity 
was treacherously thrust upon us by our enemies. Now, 
very naturally, we are preoccupied with many responsi- 
bilities in our conquest. Nevertheless, wisdom demands 




B. C. BRIDGES 

that we pause to transpose the axiom "In time of peace 
prepare for war," to read, "In time of war, prepare for 
peace! 

It is true that our first objective is the attainment of 
victory ; however, our ultimate goal will be the establish- 
ment of a lasting peace. Human intelligence, by now, 
should be competent to devise ways and means of prevent- 
ing any recurrence of warfare's tragic inutility. At this 
suggestion, some will protest, "It can't be done!" Not- 
withstanding, it can be done, and (just as other crimes 
have been curbed) through effective measures of law- 
enforcement. 

War is a crime; it is the most horrible of all crimes. 
Experience has shown that the practical way to restrain 
crime is by armed force. It follows that an armed force, 
with the needful strength and purpose, can prevent war ; 
in short, a World Police Force. 

To the average person, the word "police" may suggest 
civic operations only; world-enforcement will be some- 
thing infinitely larger. A world police force could not 
function effectively as other than a military organization ; 
and to be assured of invincibility, it should include a 
strength superior to any conceivable combination of re- 
bellious combatants. However, its ultimate size, strategic 
distribution, powers and duties, are matters for future 
determination. Although a world police force would, no 
doubt, perform other functions, its first and foremost 



would be the maintenance of peace. In this case, single- 
ness of purpose is a virtue, since with simplicity there is 
less danger of disorder. 

In the past, most of the suggestions toward world 
peace have taken the form of vague expressions of still 
vaguer purposes. Little has been offered that can be 
viewed with any degree of confidence. Heretofore, world 
treaties, covenants, pacts and agreements have failed to 
preserve peace in the absence of an international force in 
their support; and so far, there has been no employment of 
force in international affairs except in war. To some, force 
may have a sinister significance. None the less, it will be 
remembered that there are forces for good as well as for 
evil. Even though a force may be put to harmful purposes 
by the unscrupulous, this does not justify its non-employ- 
ment on these grounds alone. The problem here is one of 
precautious control. Both moral and physical forces be- 
come propitious when they function as servants of the 
law. However, laws can not be upheld by moral force 
alone. 

Freedom and law are inseparable, and law, to be effec- 
tive, must have the support of enforcement. The estab- 
lishment of freedom and peace demands supernational 
authority as the custodian of justice, to draft an interna- 
tional bill of rights, and to regulate sanctions and 
penalties. 

All past wars have been fought in the name of "free- 
dom" ; but up to the present, the nations of the world, in 
the absence of any higher authority, have existed not in 
real freedom, but in a state of anarchy. This has been the 
old conception of freedom ; a group of national and in- 
imical sovereign states, all waiting to spring at the others' 
throats. True freedom can exist only under beneficent 
law that prevents unprovoked attack and provides redress 
for injury. Real freedom and peace can be sustained by a 
world police force directed by a national federation in 
which all nations may have a voice in their own supervi- 
sion and control, and in their peaceful dealings with each 
other, through their own elected representatives. 

Impartial supervision of a world police force can be 
insured only by careful fore-planning. Its personnel, repre- 
sentatives, and directors must be chosen and empowered 
circumspectly. It can be a great power for good, but in the 
wrong hands, a power for great evil also. Force without 
justice brings ruin ; and justice must control this organized 
force, which must not become the instrument of tyranny, 
but must be subordinate to the service of world order, of 
economic and social security, and the preservation of 
peace. 

To prove this project practical, some explanation may 
be necessary. As a rule, the solution of a problem comes 
with careful analysis of its causes. So it is in our present 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



requirement. In the dominant concern of global warfare, 
the fact may be overlooked that we can not hope to pre- 
vent future wars merely by defeating our adversaries in 
this one. Victory inevitably reaps a rich harvest of resent- 
ment in the vanquished, and retaliation has blasted back 
the vast wastages of war repeatedly. For centuries, people 
of the world have been systematically taught to hate 
everyone and everything in any way related to an oppos- 
ing nation. Thus, prejudice judges every man, woman and 
child in a warring country accountable for the doings of 
their national leaders. Hatred is a time-bomb that explodes 
without warning, wreaking havoc upon the hated and the 
haters alike. 

War, like lesser crimes, has many causes, and greed is 
seen as one of the largest. Selfish interests which profit 
from war, have sustained the delusion of war's necessity 
through the organized lies of propaganda. 

Ignorance encourages war, and has long held civiliza- 
tion in check; and in many cases it has been artificially 
imposed. Although this may not be so conspicuous in 
America, it exists elsewhere under "upper-class" domi- 
nance. In social structures which are inequalitarian, 
leaders of the old regime flourish by creating and sustain- 
ing want and illiteracy, while man still clings to his obso- 
lete belief in the "divine right" of kings and rulers, as 
opposed to the moral rights of mankind. As it relates to 
all offenders, and especially to those who cause war, this 
attitude lessens the real magnitude of the crime by the 
artificial magnitude of the criminal. 

Bad economic conditions also have contributed. When 
life's comforts and necessities are wanting, people turn 
hopefully to those who offer false promises, only to be led, 
and finally driven, into chaos. 

There is little of the admirable in the dealings of many 
of the directors of international affairs, the so-called 
"world-rulers," who have proven selfish, obstinate and 
unimaginative. Throughout history, it is amazing to note 
the monarchs, dictators, and other controllers of destiny, 
who have attained to such high levels of incompetence. 
For those who challenge these assertions, the present world 
turmoil should be ample proof of mismanagement. More- 
over, as a result of this delinquency, much nonsensical ruin 
and slaughter have befallen. Even this might seem less 
deplorable had the responsible persons been penalized ; but, 
unfortunately, our casualty lists include all too few unde- 
sirable or non-productive individuals. For these evils there 
can be no successful cure that is not founded upon princi- 
ple, and law, and justice for all. 

Yet another factor in past blunders is the common and 
near-sighted failure to see the world-problems of society 
from their beginning. It demands a stereoscopic view- 
point to perceive these realities. Early men were predatory 
prowlers, whose chief concerns were food and self-protec- 
tion. This was modified by tribal existence, although a 
long period of nomadic life preceded the development of 
agriculture. From hunting, a struggle for security and 
mastery, and for survival, nature finally taught man the 
art of provision and the virtue of prudence. Man began 
with speech, and civilization with tilling the soil. Never- 



theless, ever since the first of our race began living in 
groups for mutual protection and convenience, some form 
of social regulation has been desirable to provide the great- 
est good for the largest number of persons. It is an unfor- 
tunate fact that men are more easily led into misbehavior 
than into ways of right living. In a large measure, this may 
be due to the fact that man seems to shrink instinctively 
from the truth, especially when the truth runs counter to 
his personal interests. 

Although the restraint of wrong-doing is not a pleasant 
task, law-enforcement is a negative necessity in social 
order. Down through the annals of history, this enter- 
prise has been conducted with varying success, although 
the need for such supervision has been both basic and 
ever-present. The reasons also are basic. Natural condi- 
tions have developed creatures which are the product of 
savagely competitive forces, wherein life necessarily preys 
upon life to sustain life, the one law dominating all 
others being that of self-preservation. 

In the simple terms of primitive existence, these cir- 
cumstances were of less importance, as compared with the 
world of today. However, modern civilization, despite its 
imperfections, at least has provided man with creeds 
kinder than the savage code of "kill or be killed." Now, 
man may mingle and traffic with his fellows in friend- 
ship. But, unfortunately, he does not always elect to take 
that course, and sometimes reverts to brutish aggression. 
Anti-social impulses such as this lead to war, and necessi- 
tate social supervision. It is the obligation of society to 
maintain that supervision in the interests of "law and 
order." War is a collective crime; preserving the peace 
is a collective responsibility. 

Very probably, prehistoric times saw the tribal taboos 
preserved by brawny cave men, whose duty it was to hold 
militant trouble-makers in check. In later years, it was 
an armed soldiery that functioned to "keep the peace," 
while in our modern world, a variety of regulatory groups 
uphold the law. As yet, these bodies are civic, state, and 
national in their jurisdiction ; nevertheless, the near future 
is destined to see the scope of law-enforcement greatly 
extended. The task of policing all nations is but little 
different from that of policing one nation, or a state, or a 
city. It is the duty of the police to enforce the law, to 
prevent crime, to protect life and property, and in short, 
to preserve the peace. At present, this is done locally; it 
also can be done internationally. 

In many instances, enforcement has aided in insuring 
social harmony. Although it may not be remembered 
now, it is none the less a fact that Americans of an 
earlier day were at war with our neighbors across the 
Canadian border. A number of sanguinary invasions took 
place. However, order finally was restored, and for many 
years we have lived next to our British and French 
cousins in peace and friendship ; no guns, forts, or de- 
fenses of any kind mark the entire three thousand miles 
of American-Canadian boundary. 

Today, Canada is noted internationally for being law- 
abiding. One of the chief reasons lies in her outstanding 
(Continued on Page 24) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



Present Task of Law Enforcement 



By J. Edgar Hoover, Director, F.B.I. 



Gratifying progress in law enforcement has developed 
from the annual meetings of The International Asso- 
ciation of Chiefs of Police. These annual conferences offer 
a splendid opportunity for the nation's law enforcement 
leaders to inventory their responsibilities and accomplish- 




J. Edgar Hoover 

ments and to chart the course that lies ahead. My hopes 
for the success of these sessions are matched only by my 
grave concern for the future of our land. 

A year ago our nation went to war. We had no other 
alternative. A vicious and heartless foe struck the first 
blow and drew the first blood. Since then our enemy has 
enjoyed a long series of victories. We have suffered de- 
feats — and others are bound to come — but there will be a 
turning point. America's military, aerial and naval might 
will have its day. Then, the stories of Axis victories will 
dwarf and dwindle to extinction. 

What has this to do with law enforcement? I can 
answer this question best by a passing reference to many 
conversations I have had with high military and naval 
leaders. To a man, they have the utmost confidence in their 
ability to meet the enemy on less than even terms and 
emerge victorious. But they also hold that they cannot win 
without the complete support of the people on the home 
front. 

The enemies we fight on many fronts, thousands of 
miles from home, have long boasted of their ability to 
foment domestic unrest and strife. And their words have 
not been idle boasts. They have done just that. Their 
underground armies have accomplished as much, if not 
more, than their uniformed forces. They have long been 
aware of the great American shortcoming of taking things 
for granted, of living in idle bliss, unaware of the pitfalls 
ahead, and of underestimating the evil of our enemies. The 
ostrich-like theories and spineless people who would throw 



away their liberty rather than fight and who would ap- 
pease rather than stand four-square to the realities of the 
day, must now take their rightful place in the ranks. 

In this, law enforcement has a definite interest. If a 
defense plant is blown up in your city tonight, killing hun- 
dreds of innocent persons and destroying the means 
whereby our armed forces may be equipped, it will not be 
sufficient for law enforcement to state that an act of sabo- 
tage could have been avoided if the plant authorities had 
been more diligent. It will be no excuse to say that law 
enforcement had insufficient personnel because some mis- 
guided politician restricted the law enforcement budget. 
Neither can law enforcement absolve itself from responsi- 
bility merely because meddlers forced restrictions on the 
authority of law enforcement to act. When these things 
threaten effective protection, law enforcement must take 
positive steps to fix responsibility and to correct such con- 
ditions before it is too late. 

The nation today looks to the profession of law enforce- 
ment as never before to maintain the internal security of 
the land. The men in our armed and naval forces con- 
fidently depend upon law enforcement to protect the home 
front while they push forward on the battle front. And if 
there are weaknesses in individual law enforcing agencies, 
now is the time to correct them. Tomorrow may be too 
late. 

That there are weaknesses in law enforcement we must 
acknowledge. That mistakes occur is inevitable. That 
judgment can be wrong is human. But they must not go 
uncorrected. The police administrator today, who is cog- 
nizant of a shortage of personnel on his force, who is 
aware of inadequate training, and who recognizes that he 
has improper equipment, should at once take vigorous cor- 
rective action. If the authority to do this lies in the hands 
of others, then he must see to it that they assume their 
responsibility. The public, who looks to the police for pro- 
tection, should know why the police are powerless to act. 

As an illustration, I can refer to an experience of The 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. Years before Pearl Har- 
bor, we began the careful cataloging of names and activi- 
ties of persons who would fight against America rather 
than for America. We publicly explained just what we 
were doing and why. And then foreign propagandists, mis- 
guided pseudo-promoters of civil liberties, silly sentimen- 
talists, front men for subversive organizations, their 
stooges and mouthpieces, and some innocent persons, criti- 
cized us. And you men of law enforcement were not 
spared, for you, too, were preparing for the evil day. These 
individuals charged that the F.B.I, was a menace to civil 
liberty ; said that the police must be restricted. 

A far-seeing President of the United States stood firmly 
behind us in our efforts to protect America against the day 
when our enemies within might attack. The value of pre- 
(Continued on Page 34) 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman J. Schwandt, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at the 
Military Police Headquarters Officers' Mess at Tan- 
foran. This treat was arranged for by our host, W. H. 
Harrington of the Sheriff's Office at Redwood City. 
Lunch was served at 12:15 P.M. 

President Geo. Burton called the meeting to order at 
1 :00 P.M., at which time there was the introduction of 
members and guests. The minutes of the previous meeting 
were approved as read. 

A letter was read from E. Raymond Cato, Chief of the 
California Highway Patrol at Sacramento, requesting this 
association for a letter of recommendation for a construc- 
tion permit of 500-watt transmitter for San Francisco- 
Oakland Bay Bridge, KRBU, to be sent to the Federal 
Communication Commission in Washington, D. C. Mo- 
tion by Winters, seconded by McMurphy, that the letter 
be sent. Carried. 

LeBoeuf, McMurphy, Winters, and Harrington spoke 
oil stations giving their identification during the last radio 
silence. Stations are to use the assigned code numbers only 
during radio silence. 

Wisnom, Collins, and Winters spoke on alert signal 
numbers to be changed periodically. It was agreed, how- 
ever, that the numbers remain as they are. 

We then had a few words from First Lieutenant Fos- 
ter H. Johnson; First Lieutenant H. W. Heiwinkel, FBI 
Agent John A. Cost; and Eugene Mathews. 

A discussion followed on lights on Radio Towers dur- 
ing radio silence and blackout. The lights remain on dur- 
ing radio silence and out during a blackout. 

Lieutenant Heiwinkel praised the Civilian Defense on 
the wonderful assistance they are giving the Armed Forces 
and is sure our association will keep our end up. 

Jack McCollough spoke on radio tube construction and 
the shortage of vital and essential materials needed for 
the construction of radio tubes. 

Mott Brunton and Winters enlightened us on the black- 
out driving lights orders for Civilian Defense and regular 
police cars. 

Frank J. Matjasich, San Francisco Department (Po- 
lice), was proposed for membership and accepted as a new 
member. 

First Lieutenant H. W. Heiwinkel, Signal Corps, San 
Francisco, and FBI Agent John A. Cost of San Mateo 
County were accepted as honorary members. 

E. S. Nasche asked for the next meeting at Sacramento, 
which was accepted. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:50 P.M. 

Members present were: Geo. K. Burton, Herman J. 
Schwandt, Henri Kirby, Edward Bertola, Manuel 
Trinta, Chas. E. Simpson, Merrill LeBoeuf, E. S. 
Nasche, C. L. Collins, Walter Wisnom, E. H. McKee, 
W. H. Harrington, Chas. B. McMurphy, J. M. Ruys, 
Ivan Hudson, John J. Hartnett, Lloyd F. McKinney, 
Frank E. Winters, Henry Bogardus, Mott Q. Brunton, 
Frank J. Matjasich, Jack McCollough, Herb Becker, 
Geo. F. Wunderlich. 

Visitors were : First Lieutenant Foster H. Johnson ; 
First Lieutenant H. W. Heiwinkel; Eugene Mathews, 
KSF, San Francisco; John A. Cost, FBI, San Mateo 
County; R. C. Kriller, Califoronia Highway Patrolman, 
KAWF, KOUG, Los Angeles. 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held in San Jose 
June 10, 1943, at the Costa Hotel, 119 North Market 
Street. Arrangements were made for luncheon at 12:20 
P.M. by our host, Henri Kirby. 

The meeting was called to order by President George 
Burton at 1 :45 P.M. Introduction of members followed 
the reading of minutes of the previous meeting. 

Charles E. Simpson, technician for KRLF, Monterey 
Police, was present and said a few words. 

The following applications were read, investigated by 
the Board of Directors, and accepted as regular members 
of the Association : Charles E. Simpson, technician, Mon- 
terey Police Department; Ivan Hudson, technician, 
Piedmont Police Department; Charles H. Cross, first- 
class raido and telephone operator, CHP, San Francisco, 
and Oakland Bay Bridge, Oakland; George S. Maxey, 
senior radio and telephone operator, CHP, San Francisco, 
and Oakland Bay Bridge, Oakland. 

McMurphy, Lewis, Tudhope, Simpson and McKee 
continued a discussion on Station Call Letters from last 
meeting. Also continued for discussion on Radio Tele- 
phone Operators' Examinations, carried on by Tudhope 
& Winters. A new discussion on birth certificates was 
started by Winters, Harnett, Wisnom and Tudhope. 

McMurphy spoke on rescue work at airplane accidents. 
He asked that all districts furnish him with the location, 
radio station, and phone number of their respective rescue 
stations. This information is to be compiled by him for 
future use, so that the closest rescue station can be notified 

(Continued on Page 37) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



Meritorious Service for S. F. Police 



Following is the list of members of the San Francisco 
Police Department who have been granted certificates for 
meritorious conduct by the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners, President Walter McGovern, William P. 
Wobber and Ward G. Walkup for the past fiscal year. 
It is one of the most imposing lists of officers who have at 
great personal risk met the requirements of their calling: 

1. Applications for commendation under the Rules and 
Regulations of the San Francisco Police Department have 
been heard by the Meritorious Conduct Board, and, pur- 
suant to the recommendation of said board, the follow- 
ing citations will be presented to the members named. The 
presentation will take place at the Policemen's Ball to be 
held Saturday, May 22, 1943. 

Commendations and citations by the Police Commission 
for the performance of acts unquestionably involving 
bravery and risk of life and with knowledge of risk as- 
sumed in the performance of police duty. 

OFFICER FRANK C. HOOPER— In connection with 
services performed by him on January 20, 1943, when 
he shot and killed a burglar at 145 Kearny Street. 

OFFICERS EDWARD W. KECK and PATROL 
OFFICER VIRGIL BACIGALUPI— In connection 
with service performed by them on December 9, 1942, 
in the apprehension of holdupmen at 1500 Fillmore 
Street. 

OFFICERS GEORGE W. HESS and JOSEPH T. 
SWETNAM — In connection with services performed 
by them on November 17, 1942, in safeguarding the 
lives of tenants during a fire at the Altamont Hotel, 
3048 16th Street. 

INSPECTOR JOHN R. HUNT, INSPECTOR 
DAVID W. BRADY, OFFICER JOHN M. RIE- 
WERTS — In connection with services performed by 
them on February 11, 1943, in the shooting and killing 
of Glen L. Warner, who immediately prior to the said 
officers going into action had killed Police Officer 
Timothy E. Ryan of Company "D." 

POLICE OFFICER JAMES A. BROWN— In con- 
nection with services performed by him on April 11, 
1943, in the capture of two burglars (safecrackers) in 
the store at 22nd Avenue and Irving Street. 

2. Commendations and citations by the Chief of Police 
for acts performed intelligently in line of police duty, for 
important arrests involving elements of initiative, intelli- 
gence and bravery. 

POLICE OFFICERS JOHN D. SULLIVAN and 
OFFICER HENRY E. KOLAR — In connection 
u>ith services performed by them on February 11, 1943, 



in and about the premises at 3336 Twenty-third Street , 
and the shooting and killing one Glen N. Warner. 

SERGEANT JOSEPH B. ENGLER and OFFICER 
JOSEPH W. NORTON— In connection with serv- 
ices performed by them in the arrest of one Warren L. 
Cramer and Louis Aguilar, who icerc wanted on the 
charge of murdering Ernest Saxon, 895 Bush Street. 

OFFICER JOSEPH P. DONEGAN and PATROL 
SPECIAL OFFICER MERTEN W. AEPPLI— 

In connection with services performed by them in the 
arrest of I son Mayes, on October 29, 1942, who was 
wanted on charges of burglary, assault to commit mur- 
der, and robbery, in this state and the state of Texas. 

OFFICERS LAWRENCE W. HAGAN and JAMES 
W. McGINN, and PATROL DRIVER CHARLES 
W. POWELL — In connection with the service per- 
formed by them on December 9, 1942, in the appre- 
hension of Timothy Watson and William Carter, ivho 
held up a liquor store at 1500 Fillmore Street. 

OFFICER JOSEPH E. RYAN— In connection with 
services performed by him in rescuing a woman from 
a fire at 320 6th Avenue on February 20, 1943. 

OFFICER FRANK J. HUGHES— In connection with 
services performed by him on February 18, 1942, while 
off duty, in apprehending three men on charges of 
robbery. 

OFFICERS DANIEL W. KIELY and FRANK P. 
CARRICK — In connection with services performed by 
them on April 8, 1943, in apprehending two men 
wanted on kidnapping, robbery, and rape charges. 

OFFICER KENNTH A. P. TILLES— In connection 
with services performed by him on March 31, 1943, 
ivhen he pursued and captured Ernest J. Sanchez, auto- 
mobile thief, and Manuel Tomescello, an ex-convict 
who was charged with violating the State Deadly 
Weapons Act. 

OFFICERS CHARLES W. SUTTON and JOSEPH 
McLOONE — In connection with services rendered by 
them on August 10, 1942, in the arrest of holdupmen 
ivho had robbed the proprietor at 82 Third Street. 

OFFICER DANIEL J. QUINLAN— In connection 
with services performed by him on Tuesday, June 23, 
1942, in the apprehension and shooting (while off 
duty) of a burglar, one Harvey J . IValker. 

OFFICERS GEORGE T. HESKETH and LOUIS 
H. FOSTER — In connection with services performed 
by them in the arrest of two burglars who burglarized 
a Safeway Store at 3520 Balboa Street. 

OFFICER KENNETH A. P. TILLES— In connection 
with services performed by him on February 6, 1942, in 
the arrest of one Paul J . Francis, automobile thief , who 
ivas wanted on several other thefts. 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



PETER MALONEY FOR SHERIFF 



Inspector Peter R. Maloney, after 26 years of honor- 
able service in the San Francisco Police Department, has 
tendered his resignation, which was accepted by Police 
Commissioners Walter McGovern, William P. Wobber 
and Ward Walkup. This move on the part of Inspector 




Inspector Peter R. Maloney 

Maloney was caused by his determination to enter the 
race for sheriff of his native city and county. Because of 
the City Charter, he had no other course. 

Inspector Maloney, native of San Francisco, joined the 
Police Department in 1916. He was assigned to the 
Potrero Station, but, displaying the characteristics that 
marked him a police officer and gave assurance of climb- 
ing higher in the profession he had chosen, he was, after 
six months at Potrero station, transferred to the Bush 
Street station, then one of the busiest districts in the city. 
He was given charge of the trouble-shooting car as the 
automobile assigned to the station was characterized. He 
covered everything from shooting a wild dog to rounding 
up criminals, and the varied work he did gave him some 
valuable experience. So much so that the late Chief of 
Police, after watching Pete's work, sensed there was a 
young man who would go higher. He brought the Bush 
Street trouble-shooter to the Hall of Justice, assigning 
him to the City Prison. He mastered that job as he had 
many others, and after six months he was transferred to 
the Property Clerks' office. 

He showed great promise and was assigned in turn to 
the Business Office and the License Bureau, and finally 
wound up in Chief O'Brien's office, where he remained 
until 1931, when he was detailed to the Mayor's office on 
special assignment, and he has served 12 years in the 
Chief Executive's office. 

While a member of the Department, Pete was one of 
the most active members therein. Always looking out for 
the best interests of the members, he was on every com- 
mittee for increase in salary for the members of the De- 
partment. Years ago he fought for a 25-year pension. He 



was selected by the members as President of the Widows 
and Orphans Aid Association on their Golden Jubilee 
Year 1928. 

Pete took the Corporal's examination and passed suc- 
cessfully, was promoted to Inspector in 1931, and when 
he resigned from the Department held that rank. While in 
the Department Pete Maloney made many friends, thou- 
sands of them, and I do not think there is ony one man 
who ever went out of the Department with so many 
friends as Pete has. 

While in the Department he was made athletic instruc- 
tor and did a fine job there. He served under four Chiefs 
of Police, namely: Chief White, Chief O'Brien, Chief 
Quinn, and the present Chief Charles Dullea. 

1 he records show that not once in the 26 years has 
Pete even received as much as a reprimand while a member 
of the Department. 

He also has engaged and still engages in many activities. 
He organized many outstanding organizations in our 
city and loves to do something that will not only help the 
unfortunate, but all of San Francisco. He founded that 
great sentimental organization, The South of Market 
Boys, also The Sunrise Breakfast Club, a social associ- 
ation ; The San Francisco Sut-in Association, strictly 
charitable; the outstanding Mothers' Day Breafast; 
Fathers' Day Breakfast ; many activities for under- 
privileged youngsters; and last but not least has been 
selected as a Director of the San Francisco League for 
Service Men, and has been gathering athletic equipment, 
billiard tables, money, and practically every article you can 
mention, practically all of which has been shipped overseas 
to our boys on the fighting fronts. 

Pete has five children, one up in the Aleutians in the 
Navy, girl in the United States Marine Corps, oldest 
daughter married, and one boy who may go in any day, 
and a youngster of 12. His brother, Assemblyman Thomas 
A. Maloney, has been in the Legislature representing San 
Francisco for twenty years and has always presented 
legislation up there for the welfare of the Department and 
its members. 

Pete is aspiring for a high office in San Francisco. He 
feels that he will be more valuable to his native city in this 
office than he would have in the position he left. We also 
feel the same way about it and we are sure San Francisco 
will recognize this man who has and is playing a big part 
in his Native City. He has been engaged in boys work, 
worked on committees for Boy Scouts, C.Y.O., and all 
Bov Clubs. 



HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A Particular Laundry For Particular People 

We Handle All Classes of Laundry Work 

3338 Seventeenth Street Phone MArket 1130 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



■ San Francisco 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

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NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
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GO SLOW— SAVE TIRES 

Because new tires and retreads contain less crude rub- 
ber and have a lower heat-resisting factor than pre-war 
tires, Deputy Chief Bernard R. Caldwell, director of the 
Los Angeles Police Department's Traffic Division, has 
issued the warning: "To avoid blowouts and resultant 
traffic accidents, do not drive your car over 35 miles per 
hftur on tires distributed after March 1, 1942." 

According to government specifications, passenger car 
tires must be produced with 30 per cent less crude rubber 
than formerly, and military or combat tires, 17 per cent 
less.' "Camelback," which is used for retreading, will 
contain 50 per cent less crude rubber. These restrictions 
necessitate the use of reclaimed rubber and "carbon black" 
in manufacturing tires and retreads. 

Passenger car tires are built to withstand 180 degrees 
(Fahrenheit) and truck tires to stand 210 degrees. When 
the carcass temperature becomes higher than these limits, 
the tire will disintegrate. Either the tread will separate 
from the carcass, or a heat blow-out will occur between 
the fabric and rubber. 

Speed is the greatest contributor to carcass temperature. 
For each mile per hour increase the friction temperature 
rises 1.6 degrees. Velocity is three and a half times more 
effective in raising the carcass temperature than atmos- 
pheric heat, which only raises tire heat 45/100 of a degree 



for each normal temperature degree. 

No instrument has been perfected to measure the carcass 
heat of an auto tire, but manufacturers have learned that 
for each pound increase in air pressure a tire registers 
when checked before and after a trip, the temperature rises 
eight and one-half degrees. The temperature of a tire can 
be found by adding together the atmospheric temperature, 
the trip temperature increase, and the normal running tem- 
perature. A tire carrying 30 pounds of air pressure has a 
normal running temperature of 30 degrees above atmos- 
pheric temperature. 

Tire wear is increased by excessive speeds and improper 
inflation. Normal tire leakage equals one pound per day 
and, consequently, inflation should be checked twice a 
week to increase tire life. Longest tire life results from 
speeds not exceeding 35 miles per hour, and for each ten 
mile increase in speed there is 25 per cent increase in wear. 

To the family, the defense worker, and the manufac- 
turer, transportation is a necessity. Cars must run for the 
duration of the war and they must run on tires! "Suc- 
cessful war activity demands a large portion of the nation's 
rubber supply" says Caldwell, "and the civilian driver 
must budget his remaining tire mileage, by reducing un- 
necessary trips to a minimum, and abstaining from unsafe 
driving practices which cause excessive wear." 



TEN SAFETY RULES 

FOR GROUP RIDERS 

For mutual safety, drivers and passengers taking part 
in group riding arrangements to conserve cars and tires 
should practice certain precautions, warns the California 
State Automobile Association. The motorists organization 
suggests these ten simple rules: 

1. Arrange a definite driving schedule with your passen- 
gers and follow it. Allow plenty of time to avoid 
speeding — it's hard on tires. 

2. Fill your car to comfortable capacity, but avoid over- 
loading, crowding in front seat, or blocking your view. 

3. Passengers should do nothing that might distract the 
driver's attention. No horseplay! 

4. Do not "show off" when driving. Be known as a safe 
and conservative driver with whom your passengers 
can ride in confidence and security. 

5. See that your passengers enter or leave the car from 
the right hand side, not stepping into traffic. 

6. Keep brakes adjusted for full efficiency, but avoid sud- 
den stops. 

7. A loaded car picks up more slowly ; allow for this fact 
when preparing to pass the car ahead. 

8. Strictly obey all traffic signs and signals. Slow down 
before you reach intersections or railroad crossings. 
Come to a full stop at "stop" signs. Be considerate of 
the pedestrian. 

9. Make daily tests to see that your headlights, tail-lamps 
and "stop" light are working and are clean. Keep win- 
dows and mirrors clean, too. 

10. A full load increases the load on your tires. Keep air 
pressure above factory recommendation. Examine 
tires often ; keep them in good repair. 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Try Your Hand At This List 

True and False Questions Taken From Captains and Lieutenants Examination of 1942 



1. The efficiency and morale of a police organiaztion 
are best maintained through a vigorous discipline. 

2. Police administrators agree that responsibility should 
not be placed without delegating commensurate au- 
thority. 

3. The best aid in planning the distribution of per- 
sonnel is through an analysis of police problems. 

4. In giving directions, it is better to tell a subordinate 
what not to do rather than what to do. 

5. Due to the type of work involved, courtesy to the 
public is less essential for a police officer than it is 
for other government employees. 

6. The beat is the primary unit of distribution of a 
police force. 

7. A police chief should have complete authority inde- 
pendent of the Board of Police Commissioners for 
the assignment of his men. 

8. Best results obtain when promotions in a police de- 
partment are based mainly on seniority. 

9. The need for patrol service varies during different 
hours of the day and night. 

10. The chief advantages to be gained through grouping 
related police activities under a unified command 
are better planning and more economical use of man 
power. 

11. Intelligent tests are not considered useful for testing 
in the recruiting of policemen. 

12. Intergration involves the grouping of related serv- 
ices under one commander who is responsible to 
the head. 

13. The best method of training recruits is to send the 
recruit out with an experienced man. 

14. The patrol force of a police department includes 
foot, mounted and motorized details. 

15. Police administrators agree that as motorized pa- 
trols are perfected the foot patrol can be eliminated, 
thus reducing the cost of these operations. 

16. If a police department is furnished modern equip- 
ment the efficiency of the department as a whole is 
assured. 

17. Under a system of unified command, one officer 
should be in charge of all district stations "lockups" 
and the central city prison. 

18. It is the responsibility of the commanding officer to 
see that his orders are carried out. 

19. When a police department is so organized that re- 
lated activities are grouped under a unified com- 
mand, investigations of complaints by citizens 
against police officers should not be included in the 
same major administrative unit as the police train- 
ing program. 

20. A police officer's physical condition has little influ- 
ence on his attitude toward his job. 

21. It is generally recognized that more efficient conduct 



of police officers can be accomplished when admin- 
istrative control is united in a multiple member 
Board of Police Commissioners. 

22. The state law requires that every prisoner be given 
a receipt for property taken from him. 

23. The Federal Communications Commission requires 
that police broadcasts must be recorded in a radio log. 

24. Violations of the counterfeiting laws should imme- 
diately be turned over to the FBI. 

25. Selective enforcement which is so useful in traffic 
control may be applied in the field of general crime 
control. 

26. Conviction of burglars is made difficult by limita- 
tions imposed by criminal procedure in regard to 
admissibility of evidence. 

27. Confidence men generally possess a higher intelli- 
gence than most other classes of criminals. 

28. In 1940 there were less than 600 municipal police 
radio transmitters in operation in this country. 

29. The first national clearing house for criminal iden- 
tification records was established by the FBI. 

30. The purpose of police communications systems is the 
distribution of police intelligence. 

31. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is not per- 
mitted to investigate crimes involving violations of 
state statutes even though the crimes are committed 
under circumstances which may ultimately bring it 
within federal jurisdiction. 

32. The National Police Academy was established and 
is maintained by the FBI. 

33. Sumptuary laws or the so-called "Vice" laws are 
easily enforced and cause little trouble to a modern 
police organization. 

34. The "third degree" is essential to good police work. 

35. It is considered good practice for a police officer to 
keep notes, especially in cases where he may be ex- 
pected to be called as a witness. 

36. A police officer arresting a person is morally obli- 
gated to advise the person where can obtain bail. 

37. The police have the responsibility for the recovery 
of stolen property. 

38. The facility with which criminals move about from 
city to city and from state to state with no fixed place 
of abode is an important contribution to ineffective- 
ness in the administration of justice. 

39. It is good policy when arresting a person to charge 
him with a more serious offense than the one for 
which he is arrested so that he will plead guilty to 
the lesser crime. 

40. A police officer who makes an arrest and who is con- 
vinced of the guilt of the person apprehended should 
advise the person arrested to plead guilty upon ar- 
raignment. 

41. It is a widely held Relief that special aptitudes are 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



required for the successful conduct of police investi- 
gation. 

42. Sir Robert Peel introduced the act which created 
the London Metropolitan Police System. 

43. The two best photographs to be taken of a prisoner 
are the anterior and profile view. 

44. Latent fingerprints may be developed on blotting 
paper. 

45. Bertillon is the inventor of a fingerprint identifica- 
tion system. 

46. In criminal investigations there is no particular ad- 
vantage in determining the motive of the crime. 

47. Different persons suspected of different crimes 
should always be questioned together. 

48. Criminologists agree that one can determine the race 
of a person by his fingerprints. 

49. When a bullet hole is discovered in a window pane 
it is impossible to determine from which side of the 
window pane the shot was fired. 

50. An important rule in investigation is never to dis- 
turb the position of any object at a scene of a crime 
until a careful description and photograph have been 
made. (To Be Continued) 

Phone ORdway 6S46 

BAUER MANUFACTURING CO. 

DESIGNERS AND EQUIPPERS 

Everything for the Beauty and Barber Shop 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

UNITED CIGAR WHELAN STORES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SANITARY TOWEL SUPPLY CO. 



84 SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS 

JOHN W. COTTON 



RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION 

166 WISCONSIN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

PAL'S RENDEZVOUS 

Refined Atmosphere 



296 D1V1SADERO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 



246 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCSCO SCREW PRODUCTS CO. 

755 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

ARTVOGUE NECKWEAR CO. 
ARTVOGUE SPORTSWEAR CO. 

Phone GArfield 5256 

MORGAN & SAMPSON 

D. Blaine Morgan - Carl O. Sampson and Staff 

SUPERIOR SELLING SERVICE 

Intensive Pacific Coast Sales 

Merchandising and Warehouse Service for Manufacturers 

869 FOLSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



KIEFER HOME FURNITURE CO. 



347 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERR1TO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond I 109 Prices As Low As Can Be 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

Home Cooking by Mama 
443 STANDARD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

DEFENSE DINER 



501 CUTTINC BLVD. 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 1599-W 

Compliments of 

RICHMOND YACHT HARBOR, INN 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



EAGLE CAFE 

BEST OF FOOD AT REASONABLE PRICES 

5 7 WASHINGTON STREET POINT RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 5895-W 

GOLD MINE RESTAURANT 

Best of Meals at Reasonable Prices 
612 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 148 

GRIFFIN LUMBER CO. 

1322 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERR1TO, CALIF. 

RED TOP CAFE 

Eats - Recreation - Prices Reasonable 
CORNER 3RD & MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Wm. C. Hoffman, Owner 

RICH'S COFFEE SHOP 

For Hasty, Tasty, F;ne Foods 
915 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

RITE SPOT CAFE 

419 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 9965 



H. E. Russell, Prop. 



RUSSELL GARAGE 

Comp'ete Automobile Repairing 
732 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

LENORA DRESS COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 
73 1 MARKET STREET. Room 404 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone MArket 2 7 72 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

ENGINEERS and MACHIN'STS 
934-944 BRANNAN ST., Bet. 8th and 9th Sts. SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

DAN S. HEWITT 

206 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

D I M A G G I O ' S 

RESTAURANT and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

No Cover Charge - Free Parking 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 



July. 1943 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 19 



Phone Mission 0862 



Enterprise Engine and Foundry Co. 



Phone Underhill 0101 

DEE ENGINEERING CO. 

Fire Brick Contractors 

170 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Manufacturers of 



Diesel Engines - Oil Burners - Castings - Special Machinery The Fidelity Mutual Life InSUtailCe Co. 

Philadelphia 



2901 18TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone TUxedo 9977 Leo Schomaker 



220 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

ADOLF BLAICH, INC. 



BLUE LAMP LOUNGE Wholesale Sporting Goods 

MARVELOUS DRINKS 543 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



56 1 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



Phone Mission 9576 

compliments of INDEPENDENT LITHOGRAPH CO. 

A & B MARKET 298 Alabama street san francisco. calif. 

2 75 1 2 I ST STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Phone SUtter 5 109 

HARRIS 8C BISSELL 

CRANE PACKING COMPANY Cargo Superintendents - Certified Public Weighers 

200 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Metallic and Fabric Packings 

259 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 5122 

COOK & HARMS 



Phone SUtter 3680 Manufacturers Agents and Brokers 

FOOD PRODUCTS 



500 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Curie Manufacturing Corporation 268 market street san francisco, calif. 

Phone SUtter 1761 

PACIFIC BRASS FOUNDRY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Everdur - Monel - Aluminum Bronze 

25 1-259 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



Phone GArfield 7818 



J. JACOBS &. CO. 



Phone EXbrook 9502 B. 'Sadie" Sada P. Dantoni Jewelry & Novelties - Belts & Leather Goods 

LOOP BOWLING ALLEYS 717 market street san francisco. calif. 



Cocktail Lounge - Dining- Room - Hotel Accommodations 

Ladies Welcome Phone DOuglas 8495 Parducci, Domenici & Co. 

238 COLUMBUS AVE. -103! KEARNY ST. SAN FRANCISCO g^ FRANCISCO SAUSAGE COMPANY 

Phon- GArfield 6814 Noon Lunch Cocktail Lounge Paul Pagni Wholesale - Full Line of Italian Sausauges - Ham and Bacon 

447 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 3000 



ST. JULIEN RESTAURANT 

De Luxe Evening Dinners - Also A La Carte Service 

140 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. VICTOR EQUIPMENT COMPANY 
Kimball and Krogh Pumps 

Phone UNderhill 1160 644 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

THE VIA VI COMPANY 



50 FELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Buy War Bonds! 
GRAYSON SHOPS 



Phon: ORdway 1833 Delivery Service 875 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



FELDHEYM'S Phones UNderhill 3 136 or 3137 

Wines and Liquors - Imported and Domestic Compliments of 



1449 POLK STREET, near California SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 535 7 



STAR PHARMACY 

498 CASTRO STREET at 18th SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



MONSON BROS. Compliments 

General Contractors 
475 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. THE GRAY LINE, INC. 



Compliments of 



Phone GArfield 9507 

Compliments of 

GRIZZLY BEAR CLUB 

Composed of Members of the Native Sons of the Golden West Q ; L_ MARKLEY 

414 MASON STREET. 8th Floor SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



710 CROCKER BLDG. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of Phone YUkon 23 77 

HOTEL PAUL COAST LINE TRUCK SERVICE, INC. 

630 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 104 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



From a Hit-and-Run report: 

"Victim reported that Vehicle No. 1, going south, on 
the sidewalk of The Embarcadero, in front of Pier No. 
9, had run over his guitar, which he had placed on the 
sidewalk by his luggage while waiting for a cab. Driver 
of Vehicle No. 1 failed to give his name and address to 
victim." 

Old Bill Shakespeare said: "Who steals my purse 
steals trash." But what would Wm. S. have said to the 
fellow who came along and drove a horse and buggy over 
his prized accordion or his trusty guitar? Judge Harris 
of the Traffic Court is in a tough spot with this brand 
new "Hit-and-Run" violation before him. 



Compliments of 

NORTHERN CLUB 

1 108 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone HEmlock 5322 

RITEWAY EXCHANGE 

Starters - Generators - Fuel Pumps 

Ford Corburetors and Ford Distributors 

455 GOLDEN GAT E AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 5380 S. M1LANOVICH. Prop. 

California Trunk 8C Suit Case Factory 

Fine Leather Cases - Repairing Our Specialty 

Radio Carrying Cases Made to Order 

444 HAYES STREET Near Gough SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 9705 



200 THIRD STREET 



A. SORIN1. Proprietor 



200 CLUB 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone TUxedo 5460 



John B. Lischetti, Manager 



SIROCCO'S 

Famous Italian Foods 



136 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Mission 0236 



LOUIS A. GERNHARDT 



GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

STOVES and STOVE REPAIRS 

Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Ironers, Water Heaters, 

Room Heaters, Linoleum 

MISSION STREET, Corner 1 8TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 9295 

SINGLETON'S 301 CLUB 

"The Club with the Friendly Atmosphere'* 
301 VALENCIA STREET, at I4TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 4862 

GARTNER 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



171 SECOND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

BEER DRIVERS UNION 



LOCAL 227 



Phones: RAndolph 964 1-9642 

BODINSON MANUFACTURING CO. 

Conveying, Elevating, Screening - Mining and Transmission 

Machinery - Light Structual Steel 

2401 BAY SHORE BLVD. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 6271 

C. E. JAMIESON AND COMPANY 

Manufacturing Chemists 
383 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Ph. ATwater 49 1 4 Better Roofing, Guaranteed Work, Estimates Free 

JACK JOHNSON COMPANY 

HOME MODERNIZERS 

We Contract For Everything Under National Housing Act 

3365 ARMY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Cable Address ALA 



Rectifiers of Spirits 



ALPHA DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

Direct Importers and Wholesalers of Imported and 

Domestic Wines and Liquors 

330-336 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 66 12 



Industrial - Scales 



H. G. OHanlon 



GENERAL PACIFIC SCALE CO. 

Manufacturers - Heavy Duty Scale Repairing 
464 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone TUxedo 9624 



Phil Anderson 



Chas. Lindeman 



TUXEDO CLUB 



105 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 6958 

WESTERN ART CO. 

Photo Frames, All Types - Quality Work For Less 

543 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Executive Offices: Boston, Massachusetts 

UNITED DRUG COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 
598 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

MISSION RENDEZVOUS 



3286 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 6522 



LAWRENCE C. SULLIVAN 



W. C. TAIT COMPANY 



General Contractors 



461 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone: SUtter 7868 and 7869 



Counsel for Bank of America 
(French American Office) 



P. A. BERGEROT 

Attorney at Law 
110 SUTTER STRET French Bank Bldg. SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

Grand Lodge Sons of Italy of America 



Phone SUtter 3943 



With Compliments of 



PACIFIC MACHINERY COMPANY 

Machinery for Every Industrial Use 
156 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

NORMANDY LANE RESTAURANT 

CITY OF PARIS 



Phone SUtter 4 148 



Residence: REdwood City 1481 



S. DUTRA 



Dredging, Ditching and Contracting 
255 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 7403 

RAMALLAH WHOLESALE CO. 

Direct Importers: Tapestries, Rugs, Sheets, Lnfant-Wear, Linen- 
Laces, Pillow-Cases, Bedspreads, Covers, and Novelties 
587 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 9932 



Bath Privileges Free to Guests 



HOTEL RITCH 

Shower and Tub Baths - A High Class, Clean and Orderly Home 
731 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Phone GLencort 0291 

FLOYD HERBERT MICK 

Landscape Architect 
1736 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



«4WK44MWMWMJJWKUKWWM»WWW9WJ^^ 



*ERlFFf ,' •> 1 | 
«■ 

Telephone MArket 7670 *! 




Phone PRrospect 1944 



O'BRIEN'S TAVERN 

Meet DICK O'BRIEN, Fight Manager, and 
BEDLY O'BRIEN, Proprietors 



390 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones: MArket 0138-39 ■ ATwater 2491 Stores All Over the West 



WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY COMPANY 

Auto Supplies - Tires - Radios - Washing Machines - Refrigerators 



2352 MISSION ST. - 154 VAN NESS AVE. SO., SAN FRANCISCO 



KARL C. WEBER 
Managins Director 




&t SPan gfaanc&co HOTEL WHITCOMB 



offers central location in direct line with both great 
bridges and railroad terminals... Excellent food and 
service... 500 attractive rooms... With private bath 
from $2.75 per day. Suites from $9. 

HOTEL WHITCOMB 



MARKET AT EIGHTH 



AT CIVIC CENTER 



Compliments 



101 Garage 

COMPLETE TRUCK SERVICE 

• 

BAYSHORE & GENEVA AVE. 



BRIGHT SPOT IN THE 

COST OF LIVING! 

• 

San Francisco and the Metropolitan 
East Bay Cities lead the nation in the 
low cost of gas and electricity for aver- 
age home use, according to the recently- 
issued 1942 Annual Report of the 
California Railroad Commission. 

Nearly all homes in this area use 
both gas and electricity. With rates at 
their present low levels, the combined 
cost of these utility services is obviously 
one of the minor items of the house- 
hold budget. 

The Commission's report shows that 
not only bills for this average com- 
bination use of gas and electricity in the 
only other Pacific Coast cities on the 
list, Los Angeles and Seattle, but that 
even their bills for 75 Kwh of electricity 
are higher. Los Angeles and Seattle 
operate municipally-owned electric sys- 
tems, which are tax exempt. Out of 
every dollar of revenue collected in 
1942 by P. G. and E., 23 cents were 
paid out in taxes. 

This excellent position held by metro- 
politan users of P. G. and E. service is 
the result of six major cuts in the price 
of Natural Gas since its introduction 
here in 1930 and six major cuts in the 
price of Electricity since early in 1928. 

Electricity costs you no more today 
than it did before the war. Gas actually 
costs you less. And they have not been 
rationed. Yet they should be used care- 
fully and without waste. 



Don't Fail to Buy 
War Stamps and Bonds 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



Owned - Operated - Managed 

by Caltjornians- 



PJ7X-743 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



Little Girl: "Officer, is this all you have to do all day — 
just take us across the street so that we will not be run 
over?" 

Officer: "Well, we have a lot of other things to do be- 
fore and after the city schools close, and on days when 
there is no school." 

Little Girl: "Well, why don't you take my grand- 
daddy across the street, too ? You know, my granddaddy 
gets very cross sometimes and curses something awful and 
calls you a big bum for taking me across the street instead 
of him. He says young ones like me can run like deer and 
he just is able to drag his legs after him." 

(Yes — out of the mouth of babes come truths that 
stump us who appraise our knowledge pretty highly.) 

Compliments of 

BOND CLOTHES 

POST AND KEARNY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ORdway 0421 Compliments of 

REV. THORA BARR 

Circles Tuesday Evenings 
1301 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phons MArket 5 760 Roy Botolfsen. Prop. 

ROY BOX COMPANY 

Boxes and Cartons - Excelsior and Packing Materials 



120 KISSL1NG ST.. bet. 11th and 12th St. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



RAINBOW CIGAR STORE 

GOLDEN BAND CLUB 

1358 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

WILLIAMS & WALLACE CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

MANGRUM HOLBROOK 8c ELKUS 

Hotel, Restaurant, and Bar Supplies 

Manufacturers of Metal and Wood Equipment 

301 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

BELFAST BEVERAGES 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone CArfield 85 78 O. Mario Sesenna, Proprietor 

El Jardin Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

Fine Drinks and Cuisine in a Newly Styled 
Luxurious Atmosphere 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone MAarket I 130 

Compliments of 

HOME LAUNDRY COMPANY 



3338 17TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



WILLIAM F. DWYER, M. D. 

350 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

DETTNER'S PRINTING HOUSE, Inc. 



835 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phones: UNderhill 0800 - Residence. Mission 7261 F. G. Lundberg 

PIONEER PIPE COMPANY 

Reconditioned and New Pipe Casing, Valves and Fittings 
634 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2486 Where Friends Meet 

BOB'S PLACE 

Legalized Liquor - Beer - Whiskey - Wine 

301 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3839-W 

RICHMOND RECREATION POOL HALL 

BRAD and TONY 

327 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Richmond 1814 



Chas. C. Rainoldi, Proprietor 



THE PINE INN 

Sandwiches - Drinks of AIL Kinds 
18 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Nick Glenos, Prop. 

RICHMOND COFFEE SHOP 

Excellent Food - Quick Service 
335 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 305 

"EAGLE CREAMERY CAFE" 

Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner - Quality Food at Popular Prices 

7 18 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



STAR BILLIARDS 



MIKE'S PLACE 

406 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



THE HUB" 



Cocktails 



RICHMOND: 6 19 Macdonald Ave. • Richmond 1113 - Bill Luiz 
Femleaf Billiard Parlor - 6 12 Macdonald Avenue - Richmond 152 
MARTINEZ: 719 Main Street - Martinez 1599 - Al Luiz 

SIXTH STREET CAFE 

"The Small House with the Big Menu" - Where Service is Assured 
267 SIXTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

We Treat You Like a Friend 

VICTORY SANDWICH SHOP 



Buttermilk Pancakes 



300 CUTTING BLVD. 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



UNCLE SAM'S COFFEE SHOP 

Newly Remodeled - Good Food, Coffee and Fountain Drink 

Your patronage solicited 
425 CUTTING BLVD. RICHMOND. CALIF 

Phons Richmond 1356 Ed Wendl 

GRAND GARAGE 

Complete Auto Service - Body and Fender Work 
Battery & Tire Service - 100% Standard Gas and Oils 

130 STANDARD AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 2481 



J. R. Gonzalez 



NEW HOME CAFE 



Featuring the best in American and Mexican Dishes 

232 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



MAMIE VIEGAS SPOT CAFE 



I STANDARD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2440 George Crofoot. Prop. Frank Perelli, Mgr. 

PARADISE GARDENS 

Cocktails - Mixed Drinks 
1534 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Phone PRospect 9968 

CLUB VAGABOND 

DISTINCTIVE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT 
839 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Phone WAlnut 6000 Service from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

The Sign of Service 

BYINGTON ELECTRIC CO. 

Radios - Electricians - Electrical Wiring, Fixtures and Repairs 

(809 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

PRESIDENT HOTEL 



Phone 3-2246 

FOLEY & BOETTCHER LUMBER CO. 

Lumbar, Paint, Building Materials, Hardware, Plumbing Supplies 

BAYSHORE HIWAY at CYPRESS AVE. SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



Pho 



1904 



Your Store of Complete Satisfaction 



HULL BROS., Inc. 



935 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Mission 3614 

SUHR & WIEBOLDT, INC. 

Funsral Directors and Embalmers 

1465-1473 VALENCIA ST.. bet. 25th and 26th SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 4711 Closed Tuesday 

RICHELIEU CASINO 

COLORFUL LATIN-AMERICAN ENTERTAINMENT 

DANCING - 3 FLOOR SHOWS - NO COVER CHARGE 

Dinner From $2.00 - Served From 6:00 P.M. 



Genaral Hardware 

Speed Queen Washers, General Electric Refrigerators, Radios, Ranges 

Dutch Boy Paints, New Occidental Gas Ranges, 
MAIN at BROADWAY REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Phone Redwood 84 THOS. TU1TE and SONS, Props. 

An Independent Home Owned Store - Free Delivery 

OLD PALACE MARKET 

Groceries - Quality Meats - Vegetables 

825 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Phone 158 S. ELIADES, Proprietor 

SUPERIOR LAUNDRY 

A Good Laundry 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



8 GRAND AVENUE 



GEARY AT VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

UNION SQUARE LOUNGE 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



177 MAIDEN LANE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



BRIDGE, BEACH & CO. 

SUPERIOR STOVES 
Warehouse and Display Room: 

TWENTY-SECOND AND INDIANA STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

CHAUNCEY TRAMUTOLO 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



706 ALEXANDER BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ALTA ROOFING COMPANY 



976 INDIANA STREET 

977 BINFORD 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
OGDEN, UTAH 



Compliments of 

288 CLUB 

288 TNRK STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

I. MAGNIN & CO. 



ROD POHL, Manager 

TALK O' THE TOWN 

"IN THE HEART OF THE TOWN" 
3 5 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 52 76 HENRY KRACHT BERT KRACHT 

VENICE CAFE 

MIXED DRINKS OUR SPECIALTY 
3074 I6TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone Redwood 315 GROVER C. ALSPAUGH 

REDWOOD CITY LAUNDRY 

85 8 JEFFERSON AVENUE REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Plant Phone 1253 - Res. Phone 3275 

BLOMQUIST OIL SERVICE 

Distributor: Heating Oils & Road Oils - Emulsified Asphalt 



Res. 406 HILTON STREET 

Plant: Chestnut 6c Bayshore Blvd. 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 407 



S. Calandra 

COLOMBO HOTEL 

Board and Room - Finest Wines, Liquors and Beer 



GEARY and GRANT 



SAN FRANCISCO POINT RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



GRANAT BROS 



America's Largest Retail Manufacturing Jewelers 

GRANT AVE. AT GEARY, 20TH AT MISSION . SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone KElIogg 2-1833 Open Sundays 1 to 3 p.m. E. C. Swingle 

ED'S AUTO PARTS 

Essential Parts Exchange - New and Used Auto Parts 
Cash For Cars in Any Condition 



19TH AT BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 752 HIGH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

CATHAY HOUSE 



ASHBY LAUNDRY 



CHINATOWN 



SAN FRANCISCO 2076 ASHBY AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phones: GArfield 2997 - Res.. SKyline 2997 

F. DANIEL O'NEIL 

BUILDER 

273 MINNA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

ASHLEY & McMULLEN, Inc. 



Phone TWinoaks 4668 



George W. Slaten 



SLATEN MACHINERY COMPANY 

MACHINE TOOLS 
ION CYPRESS STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 4470 

HENRY I. MEADOWS, JR. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



6TH AVENUE AT CEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 9 16 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



SUPERNATIONAL PEACE ENFORCEMENT 

(Continued from page 11) 

enforcement officers, the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police. Over all of Canada's rugged territory the 
"Mounties" patrol; their "beat" is bounded by three 
oceans, and stretches to the Arctic foreshores. In Canada, 
the R.C.M.P. conduct the entire enforcement program, 
and their byword, known the world over, "The Mounties 
always get their man," is evidence of their efficiency. 

Let us consider how law-enforcement has succeeded in 
more local instances. When new American territories were 
being peopled as in California, Alaska, and elsewhere, it 
was customary for the average person to carry firearms. 
Any dispute was likely to result in "gun play" and homi- 
cide. Lawless killers ran rampant, and "hemp justice" 
was meted out summarily by often over-zealous vigilantes. 
In those days, the peace-loving citizen was at a decided 
disadvantage. Now, the old order is changed. Gone is 
the typical western "bad man," and "neck-tie parties" are 
no longer popular. It has been made illegal to carry wea- 
pons indiscriminately, and disobedience to the law brings 
punishment. 

It needs little imagination to see in present world con- 
ditions the counterpart of lawless frontier settlements of 
earlier days. Now, the local "bad men" are illegitimately 
glorified as "dictators." Various weapons are used, caus- 
ing casualties, while the law-abiding and peaceful citizen 
(just as in the earlier time) is ruthlessly assaulted, and 
his possessions despoiled. Also, we see the sly frontier 
gambler and dive-keeper personified in certain questionable 
enterprises that fatten on the tragedies of conflict. Time 
has seen the eclipse of many forms of lawlessness, and the 
day is near that will see the eradication of the most terrible 
of all illegalities — war. When the proper world super- 
vision has been established, national militant fanatics can 
be dealt with just as easily as the local gangster or soap- 
box radical. 

The practicality of dealing with world criminals by 
police methods is understandable when we consider the 
varied capabilities of modern police science, and the his- 
toric development which led to these attainments. Pre- 
serving the peace always has been an important duty of 
law-enforcement, and numerous organized bodies have 
served in that capacity. Now, the functions of the police 
may be classified generally as punitive and preventive, 
the first category having to do with the apprehension 
and punishment of law-breakers, and the second dealing 
with the restraint of crime in general, although it is only 
in recent years that this has been given much consideration. 
Nevertheless, the ancient civilizations had their police 
which, although resembling ours in many ways, were mili- 
tary forms, primarily. 

Modern enforcement bodies still retain the "trade- 
marks" of those earlier institutions. It is from old Roman 
and English "common-law" that much of our modern 
jurisprudence was taken. The word "copper," as a jocular 
name for a police officer, originated in England where 
primary police were semi-military, and those especially 



delegated to police work wore copper helmets and copper 
breast-plates as distinguishing emblems. 

Another enduring influence comes from the old Anglo- 

Phone OLympic 7914 MORRIS SAWS WORK 

MORRIS SAW WORKS 

Grinding and Repairing of All Descriptions 

Saw Filing - Tool Grinding - Steel Tapes Repaired 

6551 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone LAndscape 5-1922 MAX ET1NGOFF, Prop. 

S. P. CORNER STORE 

A FULL LINE of LIQUORS and CIGARS 

Agent Pacific Greyhound Stages 

865 SAN PABLO AVENUE ALBANY. CALIF. 



FREDRICKSON BROTHERS 

CONTRACTORS 



1259 65TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SUNSET MANUFACTURING CO. 



I 195 65TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Day or Night: HU 3011 FRED FLICK1NGER, Prop. 

Day and Night road service anywhere in Northern California 

DIESEL TRUCK SERVICE 

Repairs and Service on All Makes 
1202 POWELL STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 7823 

GARDINER MANUFACTURING CO. 



2 707 UNION STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 9292 C. LANDOWITZ. Manager 

DRAKE CLEANERS 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
1167 SIXTY-FIFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 101 I 



W. G. LEDGETT, Manager 



PIONEER SAWDUST DEPOT 

Pine, Oak, Redwood and Cedar Sawdust Sifted to All Grades 
2800 PERALTA STREET - OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone HUmboldt 783 1 

WESTERN IRON & BODY WORKS 

Industrial Steel Products 
1189 65TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone OLympic 0670 J. R. GRANT 

HOME FIXTURE BUILDERS 

Manufacturers of Bilt-Rite Cabinets 
1189 65TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 5585 

CHIODO CANDY COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers of Fine Candies 
Highest Grade Pan Confections 

2923 ADELINE STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Redwood 258 Dependable Service Since 1895 H. E. Holmquist 

HOLMQUIST HARDWARE 

A Complete Line of General Hardware, Pipe, Valves 
Fittings, Bolts and Fuller Paints 

MAIN and STAMBAUGH STREETS REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



CENTRAL CAFE 

1628 EL CAMINO REAL REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 

Phone 2291 LOUISA FRANCIS - Prop's. - JACK ZARCHIN 

HOTEL FRANSTAFF 



852 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



Saxon system that divided the territory into sections or 
"shires," over each of which was appointed a king's repre- 
sentative known as a "shire-reeve," from which comes 
our modern "sheriff." The Normans conquered the Anglo- 
Saxons, and changed the shires to "counties." Each county 
had a sheriff, and the residents of the counties were di- 
vided into groups of one hundred, which were in turn 
subdivided into groups of ten ; that is, ten "free holders" 
and their families. This was known as a "tithing" (ten), 
and each of these lesser groups had a leader who was 
responsible for all in his group, just as the sheriff was 
accountable for all of his "tithing-men." Fleeing law- 
breakers were hunted zealously, additional county units 
taking up the chase, as the fugitive might seek safety in 
their territories. This pursuit was known as the "hue and 
cry." Later came the English "watch and ward" system, 
wherein ordinary citizens were chosen to patrol the 
streets at night. This somewhat indifferent practice was 
introduced in London under Charles I, and the watchmen 
were dubbed "Charleys." They were required to walk 
their "beats," to question suspicious characters (after the 
ten-o'clock curfew), to be on the lookout for fires or other 
disturbances, and at intervals, to call out the hour, the 
state of the weather, and to report that "all was well," 
if such were the case. 

In 1829, the forerunner of modern police depart- 
ments was organized in England by Sir Robert Peel, from 
whose given name the English "Bobbie" gained his 
present-day quip-title. Although there existed the Irish 
Constabulary, the famed Gendarmerie of France, as well 
as other similar bodies elsewhere, the American police 
seem to have acquired much from earlier English methods. 
Colonial America employed the "watch-ward" system, 
and the watchman was also the "Town Crier." In the 
event of trouble, he notified the constable, who then took 
charge of the situation. Under this plan, the watchman 
was appointed by the "ward boss," for whom he was a 
political henchman, usually. In 1845, America adopted 
England's metropolitan police system, a decided advance- 
ment, and the advent of civil service in 1873 aided in 
raising the American police standards. 

It is indeed a far cry from the watchman who walked 
nightlv through the streets of old London, shouting 
"Twelve o'clock, and all's well!", to the modern police 
officer in his radio-patrol-car. An ancient custom has been 
expanded into a highly specialized modern science, a 
science that still is advancing and expanding constantly. It 
is probable that few fields of human endeavor can display 
more attainment and future promise since their inception, 
than that of law-enforcement. Where the police officer's 
duties once were few and simple, now they are many and 
involved. 

Nevertheless, it is a self-evident fact that organized law- 
enforcement has accomplished only as much in the control 
and prevention of crime as the public has permitted. This 
is especially true of the American police, and it applies 
directly to policing the entire world. The human animal, 
by nature, resents restraint, and although the necessitv for 
some form of social regulation may be generally conceded, 



Phone ELkridge 1932 



TASTE GOOD BAKERY 



2520 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

SWIFT & COMPANY 



DUMONTS FOUNDRY 

IRON CASTINGS 

32 19 UNION STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HIgate 0645 

SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

22 12 POPLAR STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 3236 

Aluminum and Brass Casting Company 

Bronze Brushings - Patterns 

1261 30TH STREET OAKLAND, CA LIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 4369 FAIR PRICES 

OAKLAND MARKET 

Meats - Grocery 
2327 MARKET STREET OAKLAND, CALIF . 

Compliments of 

LEA-MORAN MACHINE WORKS 

6365 SAN PABLO AVENUE EMER YVILLE, CALIF. 

HERB'S SMOKE SHOP 



817 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 4507 



Fearey Plumbing and Heating Co. 



1075 FORTIETH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GL. 6947 FRED SANSONI, Prop. 

F. 8C F. CAFE 

Specializing in Lunches, Sandwiches 

BEER & WINE 

2335 MARKET STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 4075 



DAVID G. PRESS 



California Scrap Iron Corporation 



23 10 PERALTA STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 8260 W. J. McGUIRE 

McGUIRE &, COMPANY 

WOOD BARRELS - STEEL DRUMS 
"Barrels and Drums Since 1880" 



FOOT OF SHELLMOUND 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 9746 



GUARANTEED TIRES 



Northern Tire 8C Rubber Company 

Remolded and Rebuilt Tires - Wholesalers of New Tires and Tubes 



5433 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone THornwall 6546 



JOHN STACHNICK 



ALAMEDA METAL COMPANY 

Metal Reclaiming 
83 1 BANCROFT WAY BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July: 1943 



the peace officer finds it difficult to enforce any law that is 
objectionable to the public. A classic example of this is 
the Eighteenth Amendment. On the other hand, when the 
virtue of a measure is recognized, the business of its 
enforcement is simplified. In short, the factor of public 
relations is vital in police work ; hence it is essential that 
this present project be well advertised to insure a vivid 
viewpoint on the possibilities of world police. 

In the past, it has been an unfortunate habit of Ameri- 
cans to take the police officer more-or-less for granted, 
and with little thought as to his problems, qualifications, 
or his potentialities. However, of late years, a narked 
improvement can be noted in this respect. At last, th? 
American public is becoming more "police conscious." The 
civic official takes justifiable pride in his local force, and 
cites its achievements as examples of attainable excellence. 
The householder is quick to appreciate the prompt and 
efficient aid that a well-equipped modern police force can 
render in an emergency ; while industrial leaders well 
realize that the success of commerce is dependent upon 
the maintenance of law and order. 

This ascendant trend gains impetus with a survey of 
up-to-date police methods and activities. Although origin- 
ally intended for the purpose of protection against the oc- 
currence of major crimes, and the apprehension of perpe- 
trators of such offenses, police departments now are called 
upon to perform even" conceivable kind of duty. Law- 
enforcement and traffic are major demands; however, 
under the heading of "general service," a host of other 
responsibilities fall upon the police. 

Common knowledge understands police duties as they 
relate to murder, robbery, burglary, larceny, and the 
familiar enforcement routines. These, and certain other 
obvious police activities, are well-known ; but few may 
realize that modern police work covers a broad and ever- 
widening field. A police officer's duties now include the 
enforcement of state and federal laws, and city ordinances 

Compliments of 

COMMERCIAL PACIFIC CABLE CO. 

Cablegrams to Hawaiian Islands and Midway Island 
22 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 0064 



Cable Address "Havisideco" 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established 1879 

SALVAGE AND DERRICK BARGES 

Ship Chandlers - Sail Makers - Ship Riggers 

40 SPEAR STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 0426 



Ray Roman - Otto Stoehr 



CUBAN ROOM 



SUTTER AT COUGH 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Mission 9581 



Famous Chinese and American Foods 



GEORGE'S SHRIMP PALACE 

AND CAFE 

Dining and Dancing . . . Specializing in Banquets 

Famous Chinese and American Foods 

2624 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone Fillmore 2414 Established 1890 

CAREW & ENGLISH 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

MEMORIAL CH4PF' S 

MASONIC AT CO! DEN r-.ATE AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone MArkzt 742 1 

THE LANGEVIN COMPANY 

Incorporated 

New York - San Francisco - Los Angeles - Dallas 

SOUND REINFORCEMENT AND REPRODUCTION ENGINEERING 



1050 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CHANCELLOR HOTEL 



435 POWELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



lei phone PRospect 5017 

Compliments of 

MARY JANE CREAMERY 

14C0 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



i el phone RAndolph 5575 

VANNUCCI BROS. 



CONSTRUCTION CO. 
Concrete Construction 



1540 BAYSHORE BLVD. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

Pacific Pharmaceutical Laboratory 

PACIFIC BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

Norris K. Davis Machine Works 

4 00 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone GArfield 0680 

Compliments of 

PRECISION ELECTROTYPE CO. 

1045 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 4933 

B. MIRSKY 8c SON 

WHOLESALE CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCO 
CANDY, ETC. 

468 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephones: SUtter 5898 - 5899 

TURNER and TAUB 

Manufacturers of 

LADIES' COATS AND SUITS 

154 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone YUkon 2092 H. V. Givens, Mgr. 

EDWARD F. HALE COMPANY 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 
925 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

FEDERAL MOGUL CORPORATION 



250 FOURTEENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone So. San Francisco 1441 LAURA SANDOVAL, Owner 

GRAND HOTEL AND BAR 

COCKTAILS 

733 BAYSHORE BLVD. SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone S. S. F. 1477 JOHNNY MARCHI RUTH MARINO 

"HOTEL CAFE" 

Complete Bar Service - Room and Board - Hall For Banquets 

315 LUX AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone South S. F. 1360 REESE LLOYD. Manager 

METROPOLITAN HOTEL 

Fireproof - Steam Heated 
=otITH SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



(covering every imaginable subject) ; searching for lost 
or missing persons, property, and animals; taking charge 
of dead bodies found, and making necessary investigations 
relating thereto; also, rendering aid to sick or injured per- 
sons, and conveying them to hospitals and elsewhere ; 
handling the insane and feeble-minded, and providing for 
their immediate care or ultimate commitment. Another 
general service, including many problems, is that of deal- 
ing with riots, strikes, subversive activities, racial quarrels, 
and other forms of social discord. In addition, the police 
are expected to respond in every major emergency, dis- 
aster, or catastrophe that may occur. The police also give 
attention to licensed businesses, to food and drug laws, 
and to all conditions relating to public health, safety, and 
sanitation. Under general service are included many other 
items which never have been clearly defined, but which 
usually are classified in police records as "miscellaneous 
reports and complaints." 

This resume, although by no means complete, fur- 
nishes some idea of what modern police service comprises. 
Furthermore, it will be remembered that it applies 
especially to municipal police. With the inclusion of state 
and national enforcement bodies, the inventory is greatly 
extended. Thus, it has been demonstrated that organized 
law-enforcement not only is an effective weapon against 
common forms of aggressive, violence and anti-social be- 
havior, but also can be employed as a useful tool for 
constructive purposes. The opportunities are unlimited 
with police powers made international. 

It is true that radical differences exist between the 
national groups, not only in their forms of government, 
but also in their habits, customs, and beliefs. Hence, the 
thought of conformity of all races to the same social pat- 
tern, is remote at this time. Although we have no moral 
right to dictate to the people of other nations concerning 
these personal issues, we can and must demand that they 
conform with simple discipline that will insure the preser- 
(Continucd on Page 29) 



Telephone CArfield 3410 



Phones: DOuglas 2071-2072 



Quality Since 1675 



ROMA MACARONI FACTORY 

The House of a Complete Line in 

Bulk and Cellophane 

VEGETABLE MACARONI "A HEALTH FOOD" 

FRANCISCO STREET and GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

JOHN B. QUIGLEY 

DRAKE-WILTSHIRE HOTEL 

340 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

GEORGE E. SWETT & CO. 

Marine Engineers - Naval Contractors 
SAN "FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone UNderhill 5480 E. H. Swing, Secretary 

GUNN, CARLE & CO. 

20 POTRERO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

PRESIDENT FOLLIES THEATRE 



AMCO MANUFACTURING CO. 

DISTINCTIVE AMCO LINGERIE 

Los Angeles Showrooms 
824 S. LOS ANGELES STREET 



837 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



HOTEL CALIFORNIAN 



TAYLOR AND O'FARRELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Fillmore 3880 Nello Cervelli 

N. CERVELLI 8C CO. 

Beer Distributors 
ACME - RAINIER - MILLERS - HIGHLIFE 



33 17 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



VAlencia 163 3 Open Day and Night 

MANHATTAN LUNCH CO. 

QUALITY FOODS - POPULAR PRICES 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



2597 MISSION STREET 
Corner 22nd 



TAYLER & SPOTSWOOD CO. 

Incorporated 

Steel Distributors 

GLOBE SEAMLESS STEEL TUBING 



Northam Warren Corporation 



813 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

j. w. McAllister co. 

1200 VAN NESS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

JOHNSON LOCKE MERC. CO. 

64 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

CERCIAT FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1043 McAllister street san francisco, calif. 

Complients of 

McKune Metal Products Co. 

266 TEHAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone SUtter 8320 

PACIFIC CLOAK & SUIT CO. 

Manufacturers of 
LADIES' AND MISSES' COATS AND SUITS 

154 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

INCANDESCENT SUPPLY CO. 



647 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



60 McAllister street 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone CArfield 75 12 

M. G. WEST COMPANY 

Since 1905 

OFFICE FURNITURE - FILING EQUIPMENT 

OFFICE PLANNING 

177 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISC O, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

SAMUEL S. PERRY 

535 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jul?, 1943 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Phone Mission 7228 Chas. Keane, Prop. 

KEANE'S MARKET 

CHOICE MEATS - FREE DELIVERY 
925 Cortland Avenue San Francisco 

Phone WEst 5 82 7 Jams, Jellies, Preserves 

THE LITTLE CAKE SHOP 

Genuine Home Made Cakes and Pies 

2437 Fillmore St., nr. Jackson San Francisco 

Phone Slitter 5214 Angelo Foletta, Prop. 

VOSTI RESTAURANT 

Lunches - Bar Service 
5 59 Second Street San Francisco 

Phone RAndolph 9 790 G. Vellone, Prop. 

GLEN TAVERN 

Beer, Wines. Liquors. Light Lunches 
2816 Diamond Street San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 2300 Stall No. 7 

CASTAGNOLA BROS. 

Crab - Shrimp - Lobster - Oyster Cocktails 
Fisherman's Cove, foot Taylor San Francisco 

Phone UNderhill 0418 

JOS. LEVIN 8C SONS 

Wholesale Dealers in Scrap Iron and Metals 
2225 Third Street San Francisco 

CROWN PRODUCTS CORP. 



Sani-Clor 



San Francisco 



California 



Phone DOuglas 5835 

LEVISON dC SCHNEIDER 

Buyers and Jobbers of General Merchandise 
71 First Street San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 0944 Wholesale and Retail 

DUMONT WINE SHOP 

Fancy Wines, Liquors - Cigars, Tobaccos 
3020 16th Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 9591 

FERRY GARAGE 

Washing, Polishing, Greasing, Repairing 
24 Drumm St., at Market San Francisco 

Phone WAlnut 1012 Wm. Martin, Jr., Prop. 

BUFORD HOTEL 

Light Housekeeping Rooms & 2- Rm. Apts. 
1969 Sutter Street San Francisco 

Phone SUtter 2 140 D. H. Saeger 

WESTERN NECKWEAR CO. 

Manufacturers of Neckwear and Reefers 
88 First Street San Francisco 

Phone WEst 6930 

Compliments of 

ALTA SHEET METAL WORKS 

1072 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phone ATwater 4122 Chester Gee, Mgr. 

NEW CANTON CAFE 

Member of Cathay Post No. 384 
35 17 20th Street San Francisco 

Phone SU. 4090 Phil Ross Chas. Drachbar 

GOLDEN GATE FRUIT CO. 

Fruits and Vegetables 
747 Market Street San Francisco 

Phone UNderhill 1388 Rotus Harvey 

HARVEY AMUSEMENT CO. 

291 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



HOTEL DALE 

Reasonable Rates - Private Baths 
649 Jones Street San Francisco 

VISIT 

RAFAEL'S 



335 Jones Street 



San Francisco 



Phone MArket 8338 We Call and Deliver 

Capitol Cleaning 8C Dyeing Plant 

Your Garments, etc.. Done by Experts Only 
20 Brady St., off Market San Francisco 



Compliments of 

C. A. SWANSON 



Phone EXbrook 9910 

VIENIVIENI CAFE 



13 13 Stockton Street 



San Francisco 



Phone ORdway 75 66 Open Day and Night 

KING'S CAFE 

American and Chinese Dishes 
4 72 Turk Street San Francisco, Calif. 

POTRERO CAFE 

Beer, Wines, Liquors 
FRANK 

199 Potrero Avenue San Francisco, Calif. 

Compliments of 

TWIN DRAGON 



Phone EXbrook 9562 N. George C. Justes 

ARCADE BEAUTY SALON 

Hair Styling 
262 Phelan Building San Francisco 

TOMPKINS FOOD STORE 

Meats, Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables 
3243 Balboa Street San Francisco 

Phone VAlencia 43 65 

STARLIGHT FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Home Furnishers 
22 I I -222 I Mission, nr. 18th San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 3913 

FAIRMONT COFFEE SHOP 



1000 Bush Street 



San Francisco 



Chinatown 



San Francisco 



Phone ORdway 4058 Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

ANNA L. CARLSON 

Massage Salon for Women 
14 76 California Street San Francisco 



Phone EXbrook 8352 

STAG 

STORE. FOR MEN 

2 06 Powell Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phones: SKyline 8141 - BAyview 283 7 

GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 

6726 Geary Boulevard at 3 1st Avenue 

Main Nursery: 516 42nd Ave. at Geary, S. F. 

PACIFIC SHOE COMPANY 

451 Washington St. San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone SUtter 9691 Steve Chibidakis, Prop. 

THE BARREL INN 

Best Drinks - Sensible Prices 
139 Ellis Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone YUkon 082 1 Miss Marcelle Carle, Mgr. 

RICHARD and JOSEPH 

Continental Hair Stylists 
45 Grant Avenue 



Phone DOuglas 554 1 



Glen L. Codman 



GLEN L. CODMAN CO. 

Materials Handling Equipment 
3 83 Brannan Street San Francisco 

Phone UN. 2977 Complete Rental Service 

Machinery 8C Drill Steel Co., Inc. 

Compressed Air Equipment - Air Tools 
I 1 62 Bryant Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 6457 Peter Giovanzana 

COLUMBIA FURNITURE CO. 

Complete Home Furnishings 
659 Columbus Avenue San Francisco 

Ph. LA. 5-9964 Tom Latronica Ed ODay 

RALPH'S PLACE 



601 San Pablo Avenue 



Albany, Calif. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Phone DOuglas 45 77 

A. D. SCHADER 

Railroad Construction - Railroad Materials 
144 Spear Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone PRospect 6464 E. Lekich 

GOVERNOR GRILL 

and Cocktail Lounge 
210-214 Jones Street San Francisco. Calif. 

BLOU-SLIP CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
865 Mission Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Compliments of 

West Oregon Lumber Company 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Ph. MA. 7432 Emil Ziegler Jacob Schmidt 

Quality Pork and Sausage Co. 

401 Divisadero St., cor. Oak San Francisco 
Office Phone: DOuglas 7923 

Dr. Emanuel Apostolides 

Physician and Surgeon 
995 Market Street San Francisco. Calif. 

Phone UNderhill 13 78 

Compliments of 

GOLDEN RULE LAUNDRY 

624 Laguna Street San Francisco, Calif. 875 Post Street 



Phone S. M. 5-0322 

H. H. BOYLE 

Real Estate - Insurance - Investments 
2320ElCamino Real, at 24th Ave. San Mateo 

Phone Richmond 43 7-W Clean. Comfortable 

MERIT HOTEL and APT. 

Steam Heated and Showers 
Cor. 8th fit Macdonald Ave. Richmond 

Phone BErkeley 6012 

B & H BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Our Specialty: Cabinets 
1325 San Pablo Ave. Berkeley, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 505 

TRADEWAY 

"Things For the Home" 
1230 San Pablo Avenue El Cerrito, Calif. 

Phone YUkon 12 00 

AMERICAN POULTRY CO. 

Wholesalers of Live & Dressed Poultry, Eggs 
340 Davis Street San Francisco 



KESSLER'S 



1 175 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Ph. GArfield 9350 Open 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

Henry's Fashion Restaurant 

Fish and Game a Specialty 
2 70 Market Street San Francisco 

Phones: GArfield 23702371 

Albert Baer Mercantile Co. 

Liquidators - Jobbers - Auctioneers 
593 Mission Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

ST. MARCHIA HOTEL 



San Francisco 



Taste Good Bakeries 
SPECIAL ORDER 



Compliments of 

GOLDEN GATE NEWS CO. 



81 Third Street 



San Francisco 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Phone VAlencia 7922 

NEW CHINA HERB CO. 

2331 Mission St., near 19th San Francisoc 

Phone ELkridge 1694 Alb. Raeta 

"Your Favorite Cocktails" 

at "ALS" 

1135 Ocean Avenue San Francisco 

Factory Phone: TEmplebar 7619 

THE MIRES STANDARD 

Cement Laundry Tray 

2242 Magnolia Street Oakland, Calif. 



Phones: GArfield 0295 - Res.: Fillmore 2377 
Emergency: WEst 1400 

OTTO LAIST, M. D. 

450 Sutter Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

JOE JUDNICK'S INN 

590 San Bruno San Francisco 

Phona ORdwav 4684 

HOTEL SHAWMUT 

Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests 
5 16 O'Farrell Street San Francisco 



Phones: HEmlock 5050-5051 

PACIFIC COAST BRANDS, LTD. 

Bonded Wineries 4322-3567 
2 700 18th Street San Francisco 

PR. 1 133 For a Happy Carefree Evening 

THE ARISTOCRAT 

For Your Favorite Drinks 
298 Turk Street, cor. Leav. San Francisco 

BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



SUPERNATIONAL PEACE ENFORCEMENT 

(Continued from Page 27 ) 
vation of world peace. Since national affairs are directed 
by individuals, nations may, in some respects, be considered 
as persons. There are no material solutions for moral 
problems, and we can not legislate the moral attitude of 
persons, but we can regulate their behavior. Imagination 
can not picture the millenium mankind may enjoy, with 
the forces, usually exhausted in war, directed to con- 
structive purposes. Humanity has become so accustomed to 
varying privation, that all the realities of permanent peace 
may seem fantastic. Nevertheless, education, understand- 
ing and tolerance will bring enlightenment, and help to 
bridge the gaps that exist between the peoples of the 
world. 

In some respects, conditions in the United States resem- 
ble those in Europe. In our country, the population in- 
cludes all nationalities ; at the same time, we can boast a 
high standard of law-abidance. Here, all races, though 
perhaps not in perfect agreement on other subjects, at 
least are in accord as to the advantage of order, and the 
need for "keeping the peace." If this control can be pre- 
served in our own cosmopolitan nation, it also can be ex- 
ercised over all nations. However, to put such a measure 
into effect, authority is necessary, and the power to enforce 
it. Heretofore, these have been lacking. Furthermore, in 
the past, selfish interests have opposed all suggestions of 
this sort, since it is plain that international enforcement 
will curtail illicit exploitation. 

With the Allies victorious, all subsequent rules and 

Phone GArfield 45 78 Printing and Lithographic Machinery 

A. MADSEN 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
126 PERRY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 94 I 7 ArthurT. Poheim Hugo Poheim Oliver Hartman 

JOE POHEIM, INC. 

TAILORING FOR MEN 
32 POWELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

ORIENTAL GEM CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone DOuglas 6549 

ERIK G. ERNSTAM 

Contracting Carpenter - Cabinetmaker 
629 COMMERCIAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

B R O E M M E L'S 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

384 POST STREET F1TZHUGH BLDG. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: GArfield 7357-7358 

N. T. TURNER CO. 

JEWELERS and WATCHMAKERS 
SIXTH FLOOR - 704 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Hhone EXbrook 32 50 



Ida R. Grebinar 



THE "GREB-BIE" SHOP 

DRESSES, COATS and SUITS - Size 14 to 50 
364 POST Sl'KEEl, bet. Stockton & Powell SAN FRANCISCO 

HOTEL IRWIN 

Monthly Rates 
108 FOURTH STREET, cor. Mission SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 3910 Exclusively Wholesale 

J. M. SAHLEIN MUSIC CO. 

Imported and Domestic Musical Instruments and Accessories 

718 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone ORdway 4884 M. J. Pope, Mgr. 

HOTEL SHAWMUT 

Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests 

5 16 O'FARRELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

CITY JUNK COMPANY 

Graders and Shippers of 

Woolen & Cotton Clips : Sacks and Metals 

617-619 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 892 7 

COOPER, WHITE 8C COOPER 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
CROCKER BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone CHina 


0099 














CHUNG 


SAI 


YAT 


PO 




716 


SACRAMENTO STREET 




SAN 


FRANCISCO, 


CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 495 7 C. J. Hooper, Prop. 

C. J. HOOPER PATTERN WORKS 

When in Need of Patterns, Phone Us 
681 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 6733 

PRICE BUILDING SPECIALTIES CO. 

Sales Engineers - Manufacturers - Distributors 
35 GILBERT STREET SAN FRANCIS CO, CALIF. 

CORBIT'S TAXIDERMY STUDIO 

Everything in Taxidermy - Leahi Garments, Gloves, Welders' Suits 
2347 CLEMENT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

J. F. PANGENDONE 



Phone DOuglas 3352 



Compliments of 



Established If 



CALIFORNIA SAVINGS &, LOAN CO. 



673 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones: ORdway 85 17 Jas. H. Lambert, Mgr.-Own. EXbrook 3 192 

COLUMBIA HOTEL ST. MARLOW HOTEL 



O'FARRELL AT TAYLOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



O'FARRELL AT POWELL 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HAROLD J. JOHNSON 

Manager: Pacific Coast Department - Bankers & Shippers Insurance 
Co. - Pacific Fire Insurance Co. - Jersey Insurance Co. of N. Y. 
465 CALIFORNIA ST. Ph. EXbrook 0866 SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 3261 Ken Schumacher, Managing-Owner 

BEAVER FUR COMPANY 

Manufacturing Furriers 
212 STOCKTON STREET, Suite Four Six Two 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 9932 Bath Privileges Free to Guests 

HOTEL RITCH 

Shower and Tub Baths - A High Class. Clean and Orderly Home 
731 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1943 



regulations for world order will be at their own option. 
Then will be the opportune time to form an international 
police force from the Allied fighting units, with repre- 
sentatives from each of the United Nations serving as 
"police commissioners" to supervise the combined naval 
and military power of their several countries. The use of 
our troops as initial material for a world police has far- 
reaching advantages. After the former World War, in- 
dustry could not absorb all of the returning service men, 
and much misfortune resulted. A perfect solution for 
that problem is at hand in the present instance. 

With the proposal of world police, a subject certain to 
be opened is the cost of operation. True, this will be 
large. On the other hand, it becomes trivial when com- 
pared with the incredible resources which already have 
been poured into war's ever-hungry maw. Armament is 
expensive, but not so costly as war. It would be folly to 
dismiss all the peace officers in the United States on the 
grounds that peace maintenance is too expensive, and that 
it does not "pay" to enforce the law. With law-enforce- 
ment removed, crime would "take over" to despoil and 
kill without hindrance ; and that, precisely, is what is going 
on in the world at this time — and on an international 
scale. In the absence of adequate forces to restrain them, 
world-criminals have "taken over," and are killing and 
despoiling; and they will continue on these lines (as in the 
past) just so long as they are allowed. Nothing short of 
a world police force can be expected to deal effectively 
with these glorified hoodlums now and in the future. The 
question is not "Can we afford world police?"; it is an 
imperative truth that we can not afford to be without this 
necessary protection. 

All the details relating to world police must neces- 
sarily be decided by the leaders of the United Nations, who 
face a grave responsibility, since the future welfare of the 

Phone SUtter 7510 

CALIFURZE, INC. 

Athletic Goods Manufacturers - Welders' Garments 



138 FOURTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 5692 

CINNABAR CLUB 

Fred Ted Young - James B. Cannon 



ELLIS and JONES STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone EXbrook 165 5 



A. FREDRICKSEN CO. 

TEXTILES 



820 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HOTEL EL DRISCO 



2901 PACIFIC AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Alterations and Repairing 



Call and Delivery Service 



PERFECTION CLEANERS 



3339 STEINER ST, Next to new Marina Postoffice 



WAlnut 4124 



2545 OCEAN AVENUE, Opposite Manor Market - RAndolph 5370 
L. A. YOUNG SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 4677 



All Work Guaranteed 



M. J. Casey 



DIAMOND CLEANERS 



Tailoring - Altering and Relining 
4005 24TH STREET at Noe SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 6025 



Auto Wrecking - New and Used Parts 



SUNNYSIDE AUTO PARTS 

Used Cars - Tires and Batteries - Auto Accessories 



13TH AND MARKET STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 542 

HAND'S GROCERY 

Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 
696 23RD STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 3297 

BUCKHORN CAFE 

TAVERN 

2233 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 758 

SUNNYSIDE MARKET 

Groceries - Meat Market - Service Station 
I3TH AND MARKET STREETS SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 32 17 



J. E. Petral 



BLUE BELL AUTO COURT 

Noted for its Cleanliness and Home Comforts 

NEW and STRICTLY MODERN 

732 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 684 7 



G. Myers, Manager 



MYERS BARREL COMPANY 

Redwood Water Tanks - Drums, all sizes 
6549 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill 9480 



Geo. Emmett, Prop. 



THE HUB TAVERN 



1680 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



STAR POOL 

SAMMY and ERNEST. Proprietors 



1555 WEBSTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



COURTESY OF A FRIEND 



WILLAT PRODUCTION COMPANY 



I 122- 1128 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 7284 



Morck Brush Manufacturing Co. 

"MORCH BRUSHES FOR EVERY PURPOSE" 



236 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



TeLphone HEmlock 1755 

PACIFIC TEA PACKING CO., Inc. 

INDIVIDUAL TEA BAG PACKING 

Coffee Urn Bags - Flannel Filter Pads 

1663 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

NEPTUNE METER COMPANY 

James R. Barker, Vice President 
TRIDENT AND LAMBERT LIQUID METERS 

320 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Telephone TUxedo 5460 



SIROCCO'S 



John B. Lischetti, Manager 
FAMOUS ITALIAN FOODS 



136 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



world is in their hands. Nothing must be permitted to 
hinder their agreement. In this compact, the major pur- 
pose is permanent peace, which holds precedence over all 
other matters. No radical changes in the various forms 
of government now existing will be required for com- 
mon acceptance of international rules and supervision, 
although it may be that some few national representatives 
will object. However, dissension could hardly come from 
more than a trivial minority. Most of the world's popula- 
tion oppose war, and a practical plan for peace is certain 
of hearty approval. Should any ruler prove obstinate, he 
would have little choice but to agree eventually with the 
force of popular demand, to say nothing of the overwhelm- 
ing coalition of armed forces arrayed against him. It is to 
be hoped that all nations may be united finally in a world 
union ; but this can not be accomplished by political and 
mechanical means alone. Full world cooperation demands 
the agreement of the majority of the world's citizens. This 
may come later. However, the immediate post-war prob- 
lems will be large and many. During this crucial period 
of transition, a firm control must be maintained by Great 
Britain, Russia, China, and the United States. Theirs will 
be the responsibility until all other nations have proven 
their willingness and competence to cooperate. 

One of the difficulties in organizing an international 
police force will be the differences in the various national 
contingents which may comprise it. Differences in lan- 
guage, equipment, training, and tactical methods are 
inevitable. None the less, these diversities can be avoided 
at the start by an agreemnt entrusting the actual field 
work to the forces of several of the larger of the United 
Nations, for example, the United States and Great Britain 
who have more closely approximated unification in their 
fighting units. However, as a permanent arrangement, this 
plan would be no more desirable than to police a city with 
a force composed only of special officers in the employ of 
a few of the larger private corporations. In the final dis- 
position, all countries policed should furnish their quota 



"HAP" HOCAN 



Phone RAndolph 9605 

Coming or Going on the Mission Road 
STOP AT THE 



"CHES" BOEHM 



AVALON TAVERN 



43 70 MISSION STREET. Corner of Theresa 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 9737 



GORDON W. PACE 



PAGE'S CLUB 



"Where Old Friends Meet" 

600 SOUTH VAN NESS AVENUE. Corner 19th SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ATwater 6854 



AILEEN CANOLES 



MAYPOLE YARNS 



Handknit and Weaving 

2099 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

NEW MISSION MARKET 



Compliments of 

WASHBURN 8C CONDON 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



CHICKEN ROOM 

In The LIGHTHOUSE 

COR. DAM ROAD AND SAN PABLO BLVD SAN PABLO. CALIF. 
Phones: Mission 1811 and 1812 H. F. Suhr, Pres. H. F. Suhr, Mgr. 

H. F. SUHR COMPANY, INC. 

Funeral Directors 

Lady Attendant at All Hours 

2919 MISSION ST., Bet. 25th and 26th SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 



BAY CITY GRILL 



45 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 6106 



LINCOLN IRON FOUNDRY 



Phone Fillmore 992 7 



LOUIS' PLACE 



Fine Wines - Liquors - Lunches 

700 McAllister street san francisco, calif. 



Phone DOuglas 7184 



Gilbert J. Longtin, Owner-Manager 



DANIEL G. LONGTIN CO. 

Diamond Core Drill Contracting 

Mineral Exploration - Foundation and Dam Site Testing 
355 FOURTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

ESQUIRE THEATER 



934 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



HENRY TOTH 

Real Estate - Insurance 

544 HUSS BUILDING 4162 24TH STREET 

Ph. DOuglas 4586 SAN FRANCISCO Ph. VAlencia 7977 

Compliments of 



HOTEL LA SALLE 



225 HYDE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



DIRKAN KAZANJIAN 



1000 25TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HUGH F. HALL 



Building Contractor 



2270 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 9581 



Famous Chinese and American Foods 



GEORGE'S SHRIMP PALACE 

AND CAFE 

Floor Show and Dancing Every Night Except Monday 
2624 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 2 772 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

Engineers and Machinists 
934-944 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 7163 



We Deliver 



Mr. and Mrs. C. Bernardi 



VENETIAN GROCERY STORE 

Fruits - Vegetables - Groceries - Beer and Wine 
806 22ND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS! 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



of selectees, and also should have a representative voice in 
the body which directs the policing. 

An inception of international enforcement came with 
the Geneva Peace Conference following the last World 
War, although, until its ultimate collapse in 1930, the 
League of Nations was little more than a "gentlemen's 
agreement," without adequate punitive means of insuring 
obedience. Germany was "disarmed"; many of her air- 
craft were distributed among the other nations; much of 
her equipment was scrapped, and she was ordered to 
restrict her armament to certain limits. In theory, 
although applying more especially to Germany, this was 
an excellent beginning. However, supervision eventually 
relaxed. World intrigue, as of old, began playing nation 
against nation. Lure of profit condoned the purchare of 
more munitions, and, like Japan, Germany was allowed 
to rearm for attack upon the very countries which had 
supplied her with weapons. Imagination can conceive of no 
greater stupidity than that which permitted, and even en- 
couraged, the horrible holocaust now raging. 

In spite of ensuing oversights, the original League-of- 
Nations plan had much to offer, since it was in the nature 
of a "world tribunal." Some such body will be essential 
to policing the world now. International enforcement 
demands legislative and judiciary support in the form of 
a "World Congress" to enact laws, and an "International 
Supreme Court" to administer justice. 

International police will replace national armament, 
and individual nations may disarm finally to the low level 
required for domestic police purposes. Through world 
police will come a new order of social regulation. How- 
ever, the novelty will be largely in degree only, since inter- 
national law-enforcement is little more than our current 
forms on a wider scale. The foremost purpose of a world 
police force, as earlier stated, is the preservation of peace. 
Under this broad heading are many duties, naturally; 
nevertheless, these duties present few new problems. 
Where local officers disarm the thug and gangster, inter- 
national agents will put down sporadic revolution, con- 
fiscate the war armaments of any would-be belligerent 
nation, and prevent further manufacture thereof. Thus, 
world order will be insured by the investigative service, 
surveillance and enforcement of supernational authority. 
Had this program been in force earlier, our present ad- 
versaries could not have even prepared to attack us. 

Achieving moral excellence through the processes of 
education requires time, and mankind, as a whole, has not 
yet established an adequate form of self-government. 
Nevertheless, it is to be hoped that from the organized 
disruption of war there may emerge a superior design of 
social order; and it should be the high duty of the 
American people to lead this great crusade. In America, 
we well know that true obedience to law comes from 
within the individual, and is the outgrowth of Christian 
principles. The thing which distinguishes America from 
all other countries is that it was founded especially to 
preserve religious freedom. In the early days of our coun- 
try, life was hard, and our forefathers held to their simple 
faith in a higher Power that sustained and guided them. 



Phone Redwood 142 MRS. ROSA BERTOLUCCI 

REDWOOD TAVERN 

Full Course Dinners - Cocktails - Furnished Rooms 
864 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Phone Redwood 8 7 

LOUVRE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



72 1 MAIN STREET 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



Phone Redwool City 1079 



LA BOLA DE ORO 



JOE ARCE 



Wine - Beer - Tobacco - Cigars - Pool 

Meals Served by Week - Month 

2236 EL CAMINO REAL REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Phone P. A. 222 14 

ROLLY SOMER 

LIQUORS - BEER - WINES 

EL CAMINO REAL at SELBY LANE ATHERTON. CALIF. 

Phone 7 7 

j. B. PERRY CO. 



Feed Manufacturers - Feed and Fuel Dealers 
1401 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

Phone Pled. 95 7 1 HURRY BACK! RUTH ANDERSON, Prop. 

DON'S CAFE 

"Where Friends Meet" 

45TH and MARKET STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 9306 J. R. S1LVA 

PACIFIC STATES BATTERY CO. 

Wholesale Battery Manufacturers 
5526 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

WICHMAN GLOVE COMPANY 

1826 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 

WHITE SWAN CLEANERS 



2929 SHATTUCK AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



JAMES BELL COMPANY 



Phone HEmlock 2 742 Serving Nationally Since 1896 

Compliments of 

The Sperry and Hutchinson Company 

S & H GREEN STAMP 
1264 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

HOCKWALD CHEMICAL CO. 



135 MISSISSIPPI STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phones Mission 181 I- 12 H. Fred Suhr, Pres. Herbert F. Suhr, Mgr. 

H. F. SUHR CO., INC. 

Lady attendant at All Hours 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2919 MISSION ST., bet. 25th and 26th 



HOTEL BELLE VUE 

GEARY at TAYLOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 6180 Special Attention to Restaurant Supplies 

ESPOSTO'S MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail Butchers 



5030-32 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



Washington, Lincoln, our present president, and most of 
our other great leaders have been and are men of this type. 
They have brought our nation through many critical 
periods. However, as America has grown powerful and 
wealthy, much of the fundamental trust she once held has 
been forgotten in over-confidence. No nation can long 
stand without a strong, clean religious faith, and it is to 
that we must return now. 

Everywhere men are realizing that a peace plan, to be 
successful, must be founded upon the Golden Rule, and 
like Christian doctrines. In 1918 this quality of justice and 
tolerance was portrayed in Woodrow Wilson's historic 
Fourteen- Point Peace Pact, the final item of which read: 
"A general association of nations must be formed under 
specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual in- 
tegrity to great and small States alike." 

On August 14, 1941, President Roosevelt and Prime 
Minister Winston Churchill drew up the 'Atlantic 
Charter" promising "... a peace which affords assurance 
that all men in all lands may live out their lives in free- 
dom from fear and want." In his message to Congress on 
January 6, 1941, the President said: "We look forward 
to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms. 
The first is freedom of speech and expression — everywhere 
in the world. The second is freedom of every person to 
worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world. 
The third is freedom from want, which, translated into 
world terms, means economic understanding which will 
secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its in- 
habitants — everywhere in the world. The fourth is free- 
dom from fear, which, translated into world terms, means 
world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and 
in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a 
position to commit an act of physical aggression against 
any neighbor — anywhere in the world." 

These are the devout principles which may help to 
cohere mankind in a world alliance for spiritual as well as 
material advancement. Meanwhile, the world must be 
adequately policed to preserve law and order., At the 
war's conclusion, it will be too late to improvise ways and 
means. Plans for this great project must be made now. 

We as individuals, and as members of the human race, 
are debtors. We owe a debt of responsibility to ourselves 
and to each other ; a moral responsibility to order our ways 
of living in conformity with justice and mutual welfare. 
And to those who now are fighting for us and for the 
preservation of justice and freedom, we are especially 
indebted. 

It goes without saying that America and her Allies 
must hold to the first purpose of an early and complete 
victory. However, foresight demands to know, "After 
victory, what follows?" Our fighting forces are doing 
their utmost to attain that victory. Can we assure them 
that their sacrifices are well-spent? If the human fright- 
fulness of this war is only to be repeated even more ter- 
ribly later, all present effort is but the payment of an old 
account with a fictitious check. 

When one is required to undertake an enterprise in 



which he is certain to be inconvenienced, probably made to 
suffer, and possibly killed, he has the undeniable right to 
ask, "What for?" Can we furnish an acceptable answer 
to that question? If not, it is high time that we prepare 
to do so. Out of the past, a countless legion thunders that 
question — "What for?" — from the fields of Flanders, 
from Greece, from China, from Poland, from Stalingrad, 
from Coventry, from Lidice, from Pearl Harbor; from 
every battle-ground the world has ever known, and from 
every soldier's grave. 

Those who have suffered and perished to emancipate the 
world from war, are entitled to an answer. Let it be re- 
solved, in the words of another great Emanicipator, that 
"these dead shall not have died in vain." At long last, the 
time is here (and it may be the last and only time) when 
we can end the curse of war by international law-enforce- 
ment. Let our answer be a dedication to this cause, and to 
the sterling truth that "the price of peace is eternal 
vigilance." 

Compliments of 



STAR POOL HALL 



1555 WEBSTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



Phone UNderhill 9480 



THE HUB TAVERN 

Where the Best Is Served 



1680 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Hlgate 0874 



George Kruse, Sr. 



George Kruse, Jr. 



WESTERN FORGE 8c TOOL WORKS 



Quality Forging 



209 JEFFERSON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 1239 

CITY CORNICE COMPANY 

Shee Metal Work - Roofing - Patent Chimneys 

3 12 1 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone FRuitvale 4666 



August Jensen 



BAY CITIES FORGE CO. 

Marine, Mine and Machine Forging - Steam Hammer 
Forging - Heavy Blacksmithing 

1038 TWENTY-THIRD AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 3 03 

WILLIAM BARRON CANDY CO. 

Wholesale Candy, Tobacco. Cigars, Fountain Syrups, Paper 
Products, Cards and Razor Blades, etc. 



2 131 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HUmbolt 0728 



AVENUE AUTO WRECKING 



Used and New Parts 

Wo Buy, Sell and Exchange Cars 

3120 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: KEllog 2-9172; residence. FRuitvale 4020 

DR. E. A. RODIER 

Dosr and Cat Specialist 

3561 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Residence address: 4015 San Juan Street 



Phone Hlgate 1286 



Repairing Specialty 



JAMES H. SMITH 

PLUMBING and HEATING 



612 ALICE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS! 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



PRESENT TASK OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 

(Continued from Page 12) 
paredness has since vindicated our judgment. When war 
came, thousands of dangerous enemy aliens were promptly 
arrested before they could move into action. But the fight 
still continues. To date, over 10,000 such individuals have 
been arrested by the F.B.I, and co-operating law enforcing 
agencies. We must not relax in our vigilance. Even today, 
there are those who would place the personal convenience 
of some Fascist-loving alien, investigated and apprehended 
because of his un-American activities, above the liberty and 
freedom of our citizens. 

It is the same problem which law enforcement faced 
only a few years ago when some misguided parole boards, 
sob-sister sentimentalists and corrupt politicians were in- 
discriminately paroling desperadoes and murderers from 
our prisons. That law enforcement has not always been 
shortsighted in dealing with the enemies of society is 
proved by one striking instance which is the most flagrant 
abuse of parole on record. Less than twenty years ago, 
Adolph Hitler went to prison following his conviction for 
violent and treasonable demonstrations against his gov- 
ernment. In less than six months, meddlers and panderers 
of justice sought to have him paroled. The Director of 
the Bavarian State Police protested strongly against his 
parole, stating, "Hitler will again take up his relentless 
fight against the government and not abstain from viola- 
tions of the law even if he is to face the revocation of his 
parole." Unfortunately, social reformers in Germany re- 
fused to heed this warning and Hitler was paroled after 
serving less than nine months of his long prison sentence. 
The world knows the consequences. Had Hitler not been 
paroled, then his Nazi party might never have come to 
power and certainly its reign of terror would have been 
postponed. 

I mention this not to emphasize the issue of parole itself 
but to point out that the law enforcement profession in 
peace, as well as in war, must deal justly but strongly with 
those who have proved themselves a danger to this nation. 
We must not be guided by individuals who seek to inter- 
fere with the true course of justice. We must not be in- 
fluenced by political, monetary, sentimental or other rea- 
sons. We must enforce our national security statutes and 
the President's proclamations, firmly and impartially. 
There are enemies in our midst and it is our sacred 
responsibility to expose their dirty dealings and bring them 
to justice. 

The nation's law enforcement agencies are severly taxed 
with new burdens brought on by the war. Understaffed, 
and often poorly equipped, America's law enforcing agen- 
cies have turned in a most creditable performance. You 
have no more important task than that of keeping law en- 
forcement in professional hands. True, you must have 
assistance, and you welcome the aid of citizens everywhere. 
But the fact remains that there are many uninformed and 
misguided individuals who would like to direct law en- 
forcement without assuming its responsibilities. 

The past few months have demonstrated that the decent 
American has no reason to fear honest law enforcement. 



Compliments of 

CHARLIE'S AND BILL'S PLACE 

1898 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 6783 



JOSEPH C. FLETCHER 

FACTORY REPRESENTATIVE 



14 15 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



J. H. ANDERSON 

Traffic Manager 

THE RIVER LINES 

PIER 3 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone Mission 4914 

South San Francisco Tallow Works 

142 EVANS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

CRANE CO. 

301 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Residence: 147 PARKER AVENUE - SKyline 6246 R. Massagli 

G. MASSAGLI & CO. 

Contractors - Concrete Construct : on - Cement Work of All Kinds 

128 PARKER AVENUE Phone SKyline 6246 SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 0750 SAGERDAHL 

INDUSTRIAL ENAMELING CO. 

of California 
Architectural and Industrial Baked Enamel and Lacquer Finishes 

1239 I7TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 5 766 



E. O. Thode 



NEW LEXINGTON GROCERY 

Fruit and Vegetables 

LEXINGTON and I9TH STREET SAN FRAN CISCO, CALIF. 

Phs. Fl. 8250-51-52-53 E. V. Lorenzini B. P. Galli F. A. Calli 

RIALTO FRUIT MARKET 

Fruits, Vegetables, Poultry, Fish - Wines, Groceries, Butter, Eggs, Beer 

3375 SACRAMENTO STREET, near Walnut SAN FRANCISCO 

PERSIAN AUB-ZAM-ZAM 

COCKTAILS 

1633 HAIGHT STREET SAN FRANCISCO . CALIF. 

PACIFIC FELT COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers - Distributors 

of Quality Cotton and Wool Products 

700-798 YORK STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone WAlnut 9708 



Dorothy Lisama 



Pete Zorich 



HOUSE OF JOY 



1423 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill 2050 



DE SOTO SEDAN SERVICE 



Swank with thrift 



Phones: HEmlock 9113 - UNderhill 9329 

LARKIN'S TAVERN 

Opposite Seals Stadium 
2411 SIXTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone HIgate 0645 

SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

22 12 POPLAR STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Nor does the honest, American-minded alien need have any 
such- fear. Invariably his fears in the past have been nur- 
tured by self-appointed apostles of social behavior who 
themselves are out of touch with reality. 

True, the "ism" advocates eye us with suspicion. They 
should. Because our nation is now convinced that we have 
no place for the hellish hates they represent. In considering 
them, trained law enforcement officers are quick, however, 
to distinguish the wheat from the chaff and to protect the 
honest alien who has sought America as a haven of refuge. 
The would-be witch hunts, which have already made their 
appearance, come not from law enforcement. In every 
instance where they have occurred, obviously well-inten- 
tioned citizens have been swept away on the wings of mob 
spirit and emotions rather than facts. 
(To be continued) 



Compliments of 



JAMES J. GARTLAND 



SUPERVISOR 



Cable Address: CEYLON - Standard Coffee Code, Bentley's Code 

McCLINTOCK-STERN CO., INC. 

Established 1907 

GRINDERS - MANUFACTURERS - IMPORTERS 

Spices - Seeds - Herbs - Leaves, Roots, Barks, Paprika, Turmeric 

Coffee: Mocha, Kenya. Hawaiian, East Indian 

Manufacturers CLAREMONT Brand Quality Spices, 

Seasonings, Coffee, Bird Seed 



305 CLAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 2332 



Joseph A. Garred, Manager 



Phone Richmond 162 7 



FRANK GERKEN 



MARK TWAIN HOTEL 



GERKEN'S MEMORIAL STUDIO 

GERKEN'S TRAILER CAMP 

2425 CHURCH LANE (near St. Joseph's Cemetery) SAN PABLO 



345 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 0475 



K. B. Mori son 



Phone Richmond 2489 Ginger Burns, Prop. Louie Silva. Mgr. SUBMARINE SIGNAL COMPANY 

Boston, Massachusetts 
CLUB THUNDERBIRD 86 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



2639 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



SAN PABLO, CALIF 



Phone SUtter 1642-1642 



BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS! 



ROLANDO LUMBER COMPANY 

FIR - SPRUCE - REDWOOD 



Compliments of 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. 



Yard and Mill: 5TH & BERRY STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE BEST FOOD FOR THE BEST PEOPLE 

CHARLES RESTAURANT 

CHICKEN DINNER 
110 WASHINGTON AVENUE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone San Pablo 2433 



CHAS. G. DOTY 



BECK AUTO & TRAILER COURT 

MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT 

Combined with LIVE OAK BARBECUE 

Where Your Money Goes Further 

2970 SAN PABLO AVENUE SAN PABLO, CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 9310 

COMPLIMENTS OF 



3 15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ARISTON 



Michel 8C Pfeffer Iron Works, Inc. 



Phone San Carlos 794 

BOOTS AND SADDLES 

RANGE RIDERS' BAR 

SCOTTIE. BILL and MACK . . . Your Congenial Hosts 



1240 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN CARLOS. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 1768 



JODELL'S CAFE AND BAR 



FRED D. ALEXANDER 



Registered Contractor 



532 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. '?" FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



HOTEL SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 



SUTTER and POWELL STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



W. & J. SLOANE 8C CO. 



Fine Furniture 



Phone DOuglas 4 185 

THE CLEVELAND TWIST DRILL CO. 

Pacific Coast Stockroom: 

650-654 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Factory and Office: Cleveland. Ohio 

Office Ph. Slitter 5136 Leif Svanevik. Mgr. Res. Ph. ORdway 9552 

SCANDINAVIAN SHIPPING OFFICE 

Cable Address: SCANSHIP 
345 FRONT STREET ■ Room 206 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

H. C. Gathings 

INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

Control Instruments - Laboratory Equipment 

Thermometers - Hydrometers 

116 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET " SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



224 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Visit the Smartest Room in Town . . . 

THE CIRQUE ROOM 

Supper Dancing every night of the week, with a Special Feature 
on Monday evenings .... No cover charge at any time 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Steven W. Royce. Managing Director 
Bernard J. Leonard, Resident Manager 



Telephone DOuglas 5188 

ISLE CAPRI RESTAURANT 

Famous for . . . BONELESS STUFFED CHICKEN WITH RICE 

550 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS! 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PACIFIC MOLASSES CO. LTD. 



215 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 0650 

ROBERT KIRK, LTD. 

37 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phono YUkon 1894 

Central California Construction Company 

General Contractors 



230 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

AMBASSADOR HOTEL 

CORNER MASON and EDDY STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 6179 Annette Bradley 

HOWEY'S BEAUTY SERVICE 

NEW MANAGEMENT 
440 O'FARRELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 8100 (all hours) Kenyon Spencer, Pres. 

KENYON SPENCER, INC. 

Elevator Service and Repairs 
1173 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Compliments of 
WAXMAN'S BAKERIES 



Phone EXbrook 5 156 



Palo Alto 



Carmel-By-The-Sea 



FRANK LOUDA, Jr The Furrier 



209 POST STREET - 1014 HOWARD BLDG. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 9882 



At Your Service A. Urrea J. C. Romo 



TIJUANA CANTINA 

The Right Place to Meet Your Friends - Best Wines and Liquors 

Prompt and Courteous Service 
671 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 2373 S. & J. Marty - J. Tresmontan 

CIVIC CENTER HOTEL 

Clean, Comfortable, Convenient 
20 12TH STREET, Corner Market SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 7865 John P. Daley Morris Daley 

DALEY BROTHERS 

General Contractors 

426 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANC1SC, CALIF. 

Phone MArket 45 14 

Galland Mercantile Laundry Co. 

Mercantile Towel and Linen Supply 
CORNER EIGHTH and FOLSOM STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 2 100 

THE AMERICAN AMBULANCE CO. 

MRS. GUS SOHER, Proprietress 
146 CENTRAL AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 



A. L. LAROUT 



225 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phones: DElaware 9422. Mission 3800 Benjamin Donner 

DONNER REALTY COMPANY 

Real Estate and Insurance 
3248 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 8936 Mrs. C. Espiritu. Mgr. 

SAN MARCO HOTEL 

RENTS REASONABLE 
1351 STOCKTON ST., near Vallejo SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phones: ORdway 5124-5125 

JACK RANIS AUTO METAL WORKS 

Rad'ator, Fender and Body Repairing - Lacquer Refinishing 
1634-1644 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone GArfield 965 1 



G. Francesconi and U. Pieri, Proprietors 

TOSCA CAFE 



3 12 COLUMBUS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phonos: RAndolph 0100-0610 

W. L. LASSWELL & CO. 



1154 MISSION STREET 



MORTICIANS 



DALY CITY. CALIFORNIA 



P>^-~ SUtter I 153 

NUSBAUM WHOLESALE HARDWARE CO. 



87 1 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



July, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE 
COM. OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from Page 13) 

in case of a crash in order that a life may be saved by a 
few minutes and also property from fire. 

Arthur Quement of Radio Specialty Co. donated a 
radio handbook, which was raffled off as a door prize. 
Chief Donald T. Wood was the lucky winner. 

W. H. Harrington of San Mateo County asked for the 
next meeting at Tanforan. The meeting was adjourned 
at 3:00 P.M. with the following members and visitors 
present : 

Members: George K. Burton, Herman J. Schwandt, 
Edward Bertola, Everett J. McKee, J. Donald Hossack, 
Lloyd F. McKinney, J. M. Lewis, Donald T. Wood, 
Frank E. Winters, George V. Tudhope, Ivan Hudson, 
Manuel Trinta, W. H. Harrington, John J. Harnett, 
Walter J. Wisnom, Charles H. Cross, Herbert Becker, 
Norman J. Peterson, Donald T. Carter, Charles E. 
Simpson, Dominic Lucido, Henri Kirby, Wm. V. Standi, 
Charles B. McMurphy, M. Jack Barlich. 

Visitors: Carrol Messier, KQCE, Martinez; Bert P. 
Ward, San Jose; Arthur Quement, Radio Specialty Co., 
San Jose; Frank J. Matjasich, Police Department, San 
Francisco ; Don Rowe, Police Department, San Jose ; 
Ralph Wilkinson, Radio Department, Bemis & Moe, San 
Jose; Al Jenning, Radio Manufacturer, San Jose. 

BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS! 

Greetings to Our New Residents . . . 

HIGHWAY MARKET 

will serve you with the Best of Fruits and Vegetables 

Across from the Palanka Kennels 

Phone Piedmont 9334 

Compliments of 

MIDWAY INN 

3607 MARKET STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TERRACE MARKET 



Phone MArket 9387 



STARR SANDWICH SHOP 



Ice Cream and Soft Drinks 



2291 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 1800 



Four Changes of Pictures Each Week 



DOWNTOWN THEATRE 

The Theatre With the Rocking Chairs 
Largest, Most Comfortable Popular-priced Theatre in San Francisco 
ELLIS and MASON STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 1539 



Credit Terms 



HOWARD'S CLOTHES 



Suits, Coats, Sportswear, Furnishings, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 
920 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

INDEPENDENT FREIGHT LINES 



Division of Cantlay & Tanzola Inc. 



5 72 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LELAND J. LAZARUS 

Attorney at Law 



RUSS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone YUkon 2905 

LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 



Soy Bean Sauce 



246 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WEst 8200 



MON1HAN-STAUFFACHER CO. 



WM. J. MONIHAN 

Plumbing, Heating and Automatic Sprinkler Contractors 



1552 FULTON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 2017 Established 1890 

Marion Treated CEDAR kills Clothes-Moths and their Larvae 

Sold at Department Stores and Manufactured by 

LINDAUER 8C COMPANY 

35 OAK CROVE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 3643 



We Deliver 



L. Couris, Prop. 



HILL TOP GROCETERIA 

Delicatessen - Staple Groceries - Beer - Wines - Liquors 

167 BRODERICK STREET, Corner Page SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 5866 

F. ALIOTO FISH CO. 

Producers - Wholesalers 
FOOT OF LEAVENWORTH- P. O. BOX 2195 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 1932 



Wm. S. Saunders, Managing Owner 



1096 23RD STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



For a Lot of Good, Clean Fun, Come to The 

49 E R 

Still Serving Good Whiskies and All Other Fine Liquors 
2829 SAN PABLO AVENUE SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

IDEAL GROCERY 



1238 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone 1711 Established 1885 

A. OUANDT & SONS 

Painters and Decorators 



A. Quandt 



374 CUERRERO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GOLDEN NUGGET SWEETS, LTD. 



1975 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BROADMOOR HOTEL 



SUTTER AT GOUCH 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 9110 



Ray Clot, Resident Manager 



DEW ALT HOTEL 

You Will Feel at Home at The Dewalt 



201 LEAVENWORTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 5451 

PACIFIC AUXILIARY FIRE ALARM CO. 

149 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

ROSENBERG BROS. & CO. 

334 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

NESTLE'S MILK PRODUCTS INC. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



KNOW YOUR ENDORSERS 

(Continued from Page 4) 

ever it has the opportunity to do so. For example, all 
banks in the country have this year received from the 
Secret Service a complete index of all counterfeit bills 
which have appeared in circulation since the size of our 
currency was changed in 1929. This index, distributed 
through the courtesy of the Board of Governors of the 
Federal Reserve System, is kept current and represents 
a free service which has never before been so complete. 
Now the Secret Service needs the cooperation and assist- 
ance of all banks in its fight against the forgery racket. 
Banks can urge their customers to be on the alert against 
mail thieves. They can warn their customers, especially 
merchants, of losses they may suffer through acceptance 
of checks bearing forged endorsements. They can build 
up friendly relations with merchants by giving them 
warning posters such as are illustrated above. They can 
and should require their own tellers to demand identifi- 
cation when cashing checks for strangers, for many banks 
as well as individuals have suffered losses due to the for- 
gery of endorsements on government checks. 

The counterfeiting of United States currency has been 
smashed by the Secret Service program of crime preven- 
tion through education. The educational blitzkrieg against 
the forger of government checks is well under way, and 
with the help of the people and the banks of the country, 
the forger will follow the counterfeiter into oblivion. Ed- 
ucation, directly applied, can prevent any crime which de- 
pends for success upon the ignorance or carelessness of 
its victims, and check forgery is just such a crime. Know 
Your Money! was the battle-cry against the counterfeiter. 
Against the check forger let it be Know Your Endorsers I 



Pacific Coast In^bIiancIS General Agents 




200 Bush Street 

momih 



Francisco 



ASK YOUR BROKER 



ATLAS FREIGHT, INC. 

ACME FAST FREIGHT, INC. 



244 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 3000 



HALSTED & CO. 

Established 1883 
By W. A. Halsted 



1123 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



THE HOUSE 



O F 



HAPPY 



FEET 



Z I N K E ' S 

SHOE REPAIRING - FACTORY METHODS 

San Francisco Stores: 656 Market Street. 1097 Market Street. 

1183 Market Street. 152 Powell Street, 115 Post Street. 

2637 Mission Street 

Oakland Stores: 1208 Washington Street - 1621 Telegraph Avenue 



Phonjs DElaware 7474-7015 HENRY G. MILLS ROY H. HINZ 

MILLS & HINZ TILE COMPANY 

(Formerly CUMM1NGS & MORTON) 



GALLENKAMP'S 

SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

MORE MILES TO A GALLENKAMP 



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Phone GRaystone 6648 



DAN E. LONDON. General Manager 



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July. 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSO. 

(Continued from Page 9) 

San Quentin — Warden Clinton Duffy and Julian Alco, 
Prison Board Director. 

San Carlos — Mayor Al Sagehorn, Chief Edward J. 
Wheeler, John Cost, FBI. 

San Mateo— Chief Thomas Burke, Mayor Claude J. 
Hirschey, J. P. Britt. 

San Anselmo— Chief Donald T. Wood, Police Com- 
missioner Arthur W. Smith. 

Santa Clara— Rev. John J. Laherty, adult probation 
officer. 

Mountain View — Chris Madsen. 

Redwood City — Councilman G. W. McNutt and 
Police Sergeant W. H. Thorpe. 

Larkspur— Chief W. V. Nicholson. 

Emeryville — Chief Louis Mann and Assistant Chief 

Farina. 

San Francisco — Police Commissions Walter Mc- 
Govern, William P. Wobber and Ward G. Walkup; 
Chief Charles Dullea ; Assistant Chief Michael Riordan ; 
Captain of Inspector Bernard McDonald; Captain John 
Engler; Commander H. M. McKinley, Chief Morale 
Officer; Commander Benton; V. D. Scott; Lieutenant J. 
Dwight O'Dell, Commanding Officer District Train 
Patrol; Lieutenant Commander P. H. Devine, all of the 
U. S. Navy; Major George R. Eckmann, military Intelli- 
gence U. S. Army ; Captain William R. Morrison ; Chief 
Joe O'Farrell; Inspector T. M. Marlowe, A. J. Gaz- 
zolo and R. P. Simpson, State Bureau of Narcotics; Paul 
Watson and Earl J. Smith, U. S. Customs service ; Sheriff 
Dan Murphy; Undersheriff William V. Hollingbery; 
Charlie McCarthy; Rev. Norman Feeley; Douglas 
Hayden, Chief Special Agent Telephone Co. ; J. D. Sul- 
livan, special agent FBI; Wm. E. Schoppe and Jimmie 
Britt, National Auto Theft Bureau; Lieutenant James 
English, Assistant Director Civilian Defense; Chief J. 
L. Creighton, Standard Oil Co. ; John McKeon, Director 
Civilian Defense; Jess Hesson, Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral; Chief Special Agent J. H. McClelland, Attorney 
General office; Donald Galbraith, Special Agent, Stand- 
ard Oil Co.; Jackson Baker, Vice President San Fran- 
cisco Bank; Assistant District Attorney William P. 
Golden; Rev. Eugene Shea, Director Catholic Youth; 
Opie L. Warner; F. H. Gardner, Supervising Customs 
Agent; City Engineer Jack Casey; Inspector George H. 
Austin, Postal Service ; Bill Nasser ; Dan Danziger ; Mil- 
ton Pilhashy; Dr. Leo McMahon; M. C. Calewin; 
Robert H. Morse; Fireman Fred Murphy; Frank H. 
Tharp, manager Burns Detective Agency ; E. J. Ehmann, 
superintendent Pinkertons; John J. Burke, retired Postal 
Inspector; and William M. Tenner, station manager, 
United Air Lines. 



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Phone HEmlock 6783 



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Factory Representative 



1415 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



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FIELD WAREHOUSING 

3 7 DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone MArket 3 700 



W. R. AMES COMPANY 

Manuaftcurers of Sheet Metal Products - Serving 
Agriculture Industry Construction 



150 HOOPER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 



E. H. EDWARDS COMPANY 



200 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 4793 



COMPLIMETNS OF 



SOMERTON RESTAURANT 



440 CEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Telephones: EXbrook 3 504 and 3505 



NORMAN J. BISS 



ATTHOWE & CO. 

PRINTERS 
Advertising and Comercial Printing 



344-346 FRONT STREET 
Phone HEmlock 4433 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Marin Dairymen's Milk Co. Ltd. 

MARIN DELL 
The Milk Your Children Deserve 



5743 LANDREGAN STREET OAKLAND-EMERYVILLE, CALIF. ^^ HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1943 



AUXILIARY POLICE ORDERS 

(Continued from Page 6) 

in each police district. Said breakdown is based upon the 
census taken by the Air Raid Warden Service as of De- 
cember, 1942. 

Number of People in 

Police Districts for 

Every ONE Auxiliary 

Policeman Noiv Enrolled 

945 
1,369 
6,078 
408 
703 
550 
500 
329 
176 
363 



Population 

78,478 

24,665 

6,078 

103,494 

137,967 

83,059 

79,049 

92,225 

74,524 

35,584 



Companies 

A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

I 

J 

It will be noted that outside of Company "I," no 
police company has its quota of auxiliary police and it is 
highly essential that this quota be reached and maintained. 

General Order 33 of March 20, 1943, was issued so 
as to encourage new enrollments and to bring about a 
higher degree of efficiency in our auxiliary police unit. 
According to the terms of the said General Order, the 
competition was intended to close as of July 31, 1943. It 
is evident, however, that in view of the strength of the 
auxiliary police in all police districts, with the exception 
of the Taraval district, the drive should be continued with 
the hope that definite results will be accomplished. The 
period of the contest is hereby extended up to and includ- 
ing September 30, 1943; consequently, General Order 33 
must be read in that light. The contest will positively 
close on said date (September 30, 1943) and awards will 
be made at a reasonable time thereafter. 

Members of the auxiliary police force who have com- 
pleted the prescribed course of firearm instructions to the 
satisfaction of the Supervisor of Firearms Training, 
Auxiliary Captain Harold H. Harlan, are hereby author- 
ized to carry 38 caliber revolvers WHILE ON OF- 
FICIAL DUTY. 

Department revolvers are not available at the present 
time and, consequently, only those auxiliary police who 
possess their own firearms of the caliber mentioned will 
be able to avail themselves of this authorization. 

It must be strictly understood that the authorization to 
carry these firearms applies ONLY WHILE GOING 
TO, ON AND RETURNING FROM THE OF- 
FICIAL ASSIGNMENT. 

Auxiliary Police Officer Frederick W. Burlingame is 
hereby appointed to the rank of first lieutenant in the 
auxiliary police drum corps. 

Auxiliary Sergeant Fred W. Kappelman of Company 
H is hereby appoined to the rank of second lieutenant in 
said auxiliary police drum corps. 



Compliments of 



HORSESHOE TAVERN 



2024 CHESTNUT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone SUtter 5342 



CLARK DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

In California — Formerly California Simplex Distributing Co. 

Exclusive Wurlitzer Distributors for the Pacific Coast 



415 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, 7, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone UNnderhill 4830 



FEDERAL ELECTRIC CO., INC. 



All Types of Sirens 
1123 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

H. V. CARTER CO., INC. 

Farm and Garden Equipment 
52 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

HAVE YOU HEARD? 

MUSIC IN THE AIR — 7 to 9 HOUR OF MELODY — 9 to 10 

DANCE TIME — 10 to 12 EVERY EVENING 



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Compliments of 

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726 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Best Wishes from 



Incorporated 1891 



THE GEO. H. EBERHARD CO. 

SELLINC AGENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Compliments 

f . t BOOTH 




280 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments 

of a 

Friend 





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Mainliner Schedules to Los An- 
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and other important cities. 

UNITED 
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San Francisco DOuglas 1681 
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Oakland Twin Oaks 1681 

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AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 






CHIEF CHARLES W. DULLEA 

Elected Vice President International Chiefs' Association 




September 




AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



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Compliments of 



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466 12th Street 



Oakland, Calif. 



DON HUBEL, owner 



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SILICATE OF SODA 
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Sixth and Grayson Streets 
Berkeley, California 







September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 

Page 

Mayor Angelo J. Rossi 3 

By Opie L. Warner 

Kate O'Connor Passes On 4 

Police Hero in Air Raid Honored 4 

L. A. C. P. Annual Convention 5 

August Vollmer "Scientific Cop" 5 

Vallejo Has Grown 7 

Battle on the Home Front 8 

By John Edgar Hoover 

Living Heroes of S. F. P. D 9 

By Deputy Chief Michael Kwrdan 

Oakland's Efficient Police Department ... 10 
By B. S. Sanders 

State Peace Officers Meet in San Francisco . . 11 

Sheriff Daniel Murphy 12 

Northern California Police Communication 

Officers' Association 13 

Police Protegees — School Safety Patrol Boys 

Win Praise in Annual Review 14 

By William C. Kilcline 

James English to War Council 15 

Editorial Page 16 

Judge Geo. Harris Absolves Officer Wm. Dowd 17 

Oakland Police Ball 18 

Try Your Hand at This List 24 

Captains' Commendation 34 

Inside Special Police Officers' Association . . 37 
By George Wil/iam Wood 

National Safety Congress in Chicago, Oct. 5-7 38 



Directory 



l he Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors. Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 
Traffic Bureau Albert S. Munn 635 Washington St. 

Residence - 226 Jules Avenue 
Dept. Secy Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 

Bur. of Personnel Lieut. Georce Heai.y Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. F.mmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Centrai Capt. M. E. Mitchell....635 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence - 438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan Drumm & Comm'l Sts. 

Residence - 4075 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 
Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenlh Avenue 
Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence- 2533 18th Avenue 
Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 
Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub-Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



When In Trouble Call SUtter 20-20 

When In Doubt 



Alwavs At Your Service 



Page 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



Products Awarded 18 Gold Metals for 
Purity and Quality 



MAID of CALIFORNIA 
MILK COMPANY 



627 Maryland St. Phone Vallejo 3-5619 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Prompt Delivery Service to All Ships at 
Mare Island 



RHEEM 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

FABRICATED METAL 
PRODUCTS 



Phone Richmond 3535 
Richmond, California 



Farmers 


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Franklin at I nirteentn 


Oakland, California 



GRAND 
MARKETS 

No. 1—1100 23rd STREET 

No. 2—1901 BARRETT 

No. 3—220 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 



Three complete markets in the heart of 
residential Defense Workers. 



i San Francisco! 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



SEPTEMBER, 1943 



No. 3 



MAYOR ANGELO J. ROSSI 

By Opie L. Warner 



The Mayor of San Francisco, as the civic head of the 
city, is in one sense, the head of the Police Department. 

The mayor appoints the three police commissioners who 
administer the affairs of the department. 

The police commissioners, in turn, appoint the chief of 
police, who is the working head of the police force. 




Mayor Angelo Rossi 

San Francisco's Mayor Who Is Seeking Re-election for 

Fourth Term. 

Policemen and their families are therefore particularly 
interested in who is Mayor of San Francisco. 

The mayor of the city, by reason of his attitude toward 
the department, can inspire a good spirit and morale and 
therefore make for departmental efficiency or, if he has 
the wrong temperament or is the representative of any 
particular special interest group he can demoralize the 
police department. 

The ideal mayor, from the standpoint of a policeman, 
as well as from the standpoint of the average citizen, is a 
mayor who will serve all the people rather than any spe- 
cial interest group. 



A mayor who represents the employers, as does one 
candidate for mayor, or a mayor who represents certain 
factions of labor, as other candidates do, would be a bad 
mayor for San Francisco. 

We want to maintain the industrial peace we now have 
under Rossi. 

Policemen know that in conflicts between labor and 
management and between other contending interests in the 
community, the police department is frequently made the 
"goat" unless the department is left free to do police work 
without political or other interference. 

Honesty compels the admission that Mayor Rossi is the 
policeman's friend. 

The policy of Mayor Rossi has been to allow the police 
commissioners, appointed by him, to declare the policy of 
the police department. 

The present police commission, some years ago, adopted 
the policy proposed by Commissioner McGovern and de- 
termined that police work was a job for policemen and not 
for civilians. 

Under that wise policy Charles W. Dullea was selected 
as chief of police. 

Chief Dullea, as we all know, is a policeman's police- 
man. He came up through various grades of police service 
through the merit system of civil service. 

No man who ever headed the police department is as 
will liked and respected by the rank and file as is Chief 
of Police Charles W. Dullea. 

The present police commission is to be highly com- 
mended first, because of their selection of Charles W. 
Dullea as Chief of Police and secondly, because of their 
policy in allowing the policeman Dullea to run the depart- 
ment without civilian interference, except on broad ques- 
tions of public policy. 

Probably it would serve no purpose to review that part 
of the history of this city where the police department was 
kicked around by ambitious politicians for their own sel- 
fish ends. 

There is an old maxim — "Let well enough alone." 

We know what to expect under the Rossi administra- 
tion. 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



We do not know what to expect under any other un- 
known administration. 

San Francisco policemen are better off than policemen 
in any other comparable American city. 

Mayor Rossi has always fought for justice for police- 
men. We should stand by the man who has stood by the 
department. 

Unwarranted attacks on the police department by radio 
windbags are simply so much "political oratory." 

Of course, it is impossible to please everyone. This is 
true of a mayor as it is of a police officer. 

The fact is that Mayor Rossi has conducted his office 
on an efficient business basis and that during the twelve 
years that Angelo J. Rossi has been Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco our city has progressed further and developed more 
than it did during any other twelve-year-period in its 
history. 

We believe that 95 per cent of our policemen will vote 
for Rossi. 

KATE O'CONNOR PASSES ON 

Kindly, efficient, and loveable Kate O'Connor has an- 
swered her final roll call. Death came to this estimable 
police woman, who was pensioned in 1937, after a long 
illness. 

Kate O'Connor was among the finest three women to 
win a civil service appointment to the police department 
back before the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, 
the other two were Katherine Eisenhart, retired, and 
Kathryn Sullivan, now in charge of the Big Sister Detail 
of the Department. 

These policewomen were expected by their male asso- 
ciates to just sit around and dip into such small matters of 
a runaway daughter or smoothing out some domestic dif- 
ficulty. But these three tyros in the business soon let it be 
known that they were in the law enforcement business to 
take their part in any beef, whether it called for courage 
or not. 

And Kate O'Connor, as were the others, was soon ac- 
cepted as a real police officer. 

Many were the "kicks" she went out on where danger 
was ever present, and she never failed to hold up her end 
of any assignmnt. She was with Detective Sergeant Miles 
Jackson and Lester Dorman when three Howard Street 
gangsters shot them down along with Sheriff Petrie in 
Santa Rosa some twenty years ago. She saw the cold- 
blooded murder and she helped round up the three men 
responsible, three men who were later lynched. 

Kate O'Connor was a genius in getting at women wit- 
nesses and offenders, getting the truth out of them when 
others had failed. She helped many an unfortunate of 
her sex, and many were these who turned to her when 
all others failed. 

She started her work of helping the unfortunate as a 
sort of free lance work down south of Market Street, and 
so successful was she in rendering assistance she attracted 
the attention of many influential people who favored this 
sort of work. It was through her success as an independ- 
ent welfare worker that landed her in the police depart- 



ment and her nearly a quarter of a century of service 
never gave any of those who sponsored her appointment 
one moment of regret. 

She was a prime favorite with the men members of the 
police department, for they knew she had that under- 
standing of their calling and that when she went out on an 
investigation she would stick until it was finished, no 
matter how tough the going might be. 

She was the widow of Jack O'Connor, chief jailer under 
the late Tom Finn, and she leaves one son and two 
daughters. 

POLICE HERO IN AIR 

CORPS HONORED BY THE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

The following resolution, unanimously adopted by the 
Board of Supervisors, was presented by Supervisor War- 
ren Shannon at a meeting of the Board August 16, 1943: 
Commending Lieutenant William J. Keays, member of 

the San Francisco Police Department, for his exploits 

as Army Air Pilot and Navigator. 

RESOLUTION No. 3551 
(Series of 1939) 

WHEREAS, Lieutenant William J. Keays, of the 
United States Army Air Corps, and a member of the San 
Francisco Police Department on military leave of absence, 
has rendered distinguished service to his country by suc- 
cessfully completing ten hazardous missions over enemy 
territory as a navigator of a Flying Fortress; and 

WHERAS, In appreciation of such notable service he 
has been awarded the Air Medal and Oak Leaf Cluster by 
his country; and 

WHEREAS, His fellow members of the San Francisco 
Police Department and the citizens of this city applaud his 
exploits which redound to their credit; now, therefore, 
be it 

RESOLVED, That the Board of Supervisors of the 
City and County of San Francisco does hereby express 
publicly its appreciation of the honor bestowed on Lieu- 
tenant William J. Keays by his country; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of this resolu- 
tion be spread on the minutes of this meeting, a copy be 
sent to Honorable Charles W. Dullea, Chief of Police, 
and that another copy be engrossed and forwarded to the 
wife of Lieutenant Keays as a token of appreciation of her 
husband's exploits. 

Adopted — Board of Supervisors, San Francisco, August 
16, 1943. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was 
adopted by the Board of Supervisors of the City and 
County of San Francisco. DAVID A. BARRY, 

Clerk. 

Approved, San Francisco, August 19, 1943. 

ANGELO J. ROSSI, 
Mayor. 

OPEN AIR FRUIT MARKET 

FRESH VEGETABLES 

SAN PABLO AVENUE. Between 60-61 Street OAKLAND. CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



I. A. C P- Annual Convention 



Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea, of the San Francisco 
Police Department, was elected fifth Vice President of 
the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which 
held its fiftieth annual convention in Detroit, August 9, 
10 and 11. 

This honor came to Chief Dullea because of his splendid 
record as head of the San Francisco Police Department, 
and for his quick appraisal of what the peace officers of 
California were faced in the matter of Civilian Defense 
and co-operation of the various war agencies of the 
country. 

Long before this war started Chief Dullea had invis- 
ioned the part law enforcement officers would have to 
play when war was declared, and with Governor Earl 
Warren, then Attorney General, he joined in laying the 
ground work that found those men charged with law en- 
forcement prepared to take over the duties they are 
today meeting. 

He has led in the campaign to put San Francisco in the 
forefront of preparedness, and the city is completely 
covered by a well organized force of air raid wardens, 
every block being covered, and he has organized an auxil- 
iary police department, second to none in this country. 

Chief Dullea while giving his experience and time to 
this important emergency work, has given his native city 
the maximum of police service, and the records of the 
Department shows throughout the nearly two years the 
United States has been engaged in World War No. II, 
crime has been kept at a minimum, and those who had 
violated the law have been apprehended, tried and in 
most instances convicted. 

In addition Chief Dullea has given the closest of cooper- 
ation to fellow peace officers throughout the state, the 
FBI and military and naval authorities. 

Under his administration he has seen the personnel of 
the Department given an increase of salaries, granted by 
the voters of this city. 

So therefore it was logical that the International Chiefs 
would select Chief Dullea for fifth Vice President, which 
in the next four years would elevate him to the presidency 
of the organization. 

Chief Dullea at the convention had a prominent part 
in the closed panel discussion on the first day of the meet- 
ing. Also the discussion of police emergency procedure, 
presided over by Chief T. Owens, Rome, N. Y., then 
president of IACP. This phase of the program was di- 
vided up by Federal agencies, Military, State and Local. 

Former Chief Bodie Wallman of Oakland, who was 
third vice president of the Association at the time he 
took his pension, was voted a life membership in IACP. 

The convention really maintained its international as- 
pect for there were representatives from many foreign 
countries. 

Among those from other lands who had part in the 
three day War Conference were : 



Lt. Colonel T. R. Blackley, British Information Service, 
General Luis Alamillo, Mexico, Chief Constable Martin 
Bruton of Regine, Saskatchewan, Canada, Chief W. E. 
Gabrielson, Honolulu, T. H. Commissioner W. S. Parson, 
British Columbia Provincial Police. 

Chief Dullea was accompanied to the Detroit War 
Conference by Mrs. Dullea, Captain of Inspector and Mrs. 
Bernard McDonald, William Schoppe and William Nas- 
ser of this city, and Former Chief James Drew and Mrs. 
Drew of Oakland. 

The following officers were elected on the concluding 
day of the meet: 

President Emeritus Wm. P. Rutledge.... Wyandotte, Mich. 

Honorary President James M. Broughton.. Portsmouth, Va. 

President Michael F. Morrissey Indianapolis 

First Vice-President D. Colburn Draper. .Toronto, Ontario 

Second Vice-President.... Fred A. Roff Morristown, N. J 

Third Vice-President T. P. Sullivan Springfield, 111. 

Fourth Vice-President Joseph Kluchesky Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fifth Vice-President Charles W. Dullea San Francisco 

Secretary Peter F. Brady Harrison, N. J. 

Treasurer John L. Sullivan Pittsfield, Mass. 

Sergeant-at-Arms W. M. Peterson Winnetka, 111. 

Executive Secretary and Editor Edward J. Kelly 

Headquarters Of/ice Manager Alice C. Pitcher 



AUGUST VOLLMER "Scientific Cop" 

"True Detective" Serial in J^ovember Issue 

The story of August Vollmer, Berkeley's "Scientific 
Cop," is scheduled for publication in the November, De- 
cember and January issues of True Detective Magazine. 

It is a factual account of the mail carrier who eased 
his mail pouch off his shoulder, pinned a star on his vest, 
and proceeded to develop into the most famous chief of 
police in the world. It was in 1905 that Vollmer took up 
his police duties, and when he retired, a generation later, 
he had risen to a position of eminence as the originator 
of nearly every improvement in modern police technique, 
and as professor on Criminology in the University of 
Chicago. Prior to going to Chicago, Vollmer was profes- 
sor of criminology in the University of California. 

The late Friend W. Richardson, former governor of 
California, was responsible, largely, for the transformation 
of the mail carrier into the police chief. It was he who 
nominated Vollmer for the position, in the Berkeley mu- 
nicipal election of 1905. The two men remained life- 
long friends. 

The story appears under the name of Gene Payne and 
Bennett L. Williams, and the October issue of True 
Detective Magazine highly praises the account. Editor 
John Shuttleworth says the story is as interesting as any 
sensational murder case, and that the description of how 
August Vollmer took his patrolmen off the soles of their 
shoes and put them onto bicycles, to increase their mobility 
and effectiveness, is a classic of its kind. 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 




Earl Dierk'mg 




John Coronado 

— — SOT. i 



M 

Guy Murray 




Bert Formaa 



.A&ST CHIEF . 



Laurence Morris 

so r ■ 




William Webb 




Edward Beck 



Daniel Horan 

— SOT — — 




James Booras 




Frank Hannigan. 



■INtl^eCTOfL 



Jack Stiltz. 

—I SST. 




Leslie LundMad 




Ralph Jensen 



> t^s^ecYoei, i 




Arno Goldberg 




Kennetk Lopez 




Harry Oliver 



ihjs*>£C"rort- ' 




George Brazil 




Herman Fapenburg 



Harold Kramer 



iP^r 



t* 



James Keelen Albert Purbelo 






Everett Chamberlin 



David Kaldonado 



George Hooper 



Rex M« Cart 




John Lacevj 



Herbert Rouse 



* 



Wilbur Holslen. 



David Tremay ne 




Leslie Nicolai 




George Wright 








ttelvin Grey 



Daniel Robisan 



Agnes Gallagher 



Helen Cavanagh 



Betty Kuebelbeck 



Police Department 1942 



*d*r 






MEMBERS OF VALLEJO POLICE DEPARTMENT 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



VALLEJO HAS GROWN 



Three years ago last July 26, Sergeant Earl Dierking 
was appointed to head the Vallejo Police Department, fol- 
lowing an outstanding career as a member of that depart- 
ment for nearly fifteen years. 

The experience he had obtained as a peace officer, not 




Chief Earl Dierkinc; 

only in his adopted city, but as a Solano County deputy 
sheriff under Sheriff Jack Thornton for five years, cer- 
tainly stood him in good stead during the three years he 
has been Chief of Police. 

While many cities in these United States have witnessed 
a growth in population never heretofore known, Vallejo 
probably has led in the list. 




Commissioner Prank Brew 



at Mare Island increase from some 10,000 workers to the 
almost unbelievable total of over 100,000 men and women. 
He has seen the housing problem licked by the building 
of thousands of homes for workers and he has seen the 
merchants of Vallejo meet the challenge that was theirs, 




Mayor Georce C. Demmon 

by providing the necessities of life as well as the pleasures 
permitted in these wartime days. 

That the powers that be made no mistake in selecting 
Earl Dierking for the important post he holds today is 
evident by the manner he has kept crime to a minimum. 
His record for the past three years is unmatched by any 




Chief Dierking has seen the population grow from some 
10,000 people to 60,000. He has seen the Navy Yard 



Commissioner Andrew Sheveland 

police department, large or small. He has worked un- 
ceasingly in close cooperation with the FBI, the Navy 

(Continued on Page i0) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



The Battle on the Home Front 

Address of ]. Edgar Hoover, Director, FBI, before Convention of the International Association of 

Chiefs of Police, Detroit, August 9. 



I look forward each year to the opportunity of meeting 
with the members of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. Here, we gather on a common ground 
of understanding to seek a solution to our mutual prob- 
lems. 




John Edgar Hoover 

That law enforcement, handicapped by the fact that 
there are fewer police officers today than a year ago, has 
been able to keep the home front secure is a tribute to its 
courageous men and women. The turnover in police per- 
sonnel has assumed alarming proportions, ranging as high 
as 60 per cent in various cities. I believe the danger point 
has been reached and some real understanding and appreci- 
ation of the strain and stress already placed upon law en- 
forcement must be shown if the internal security of this 
country is not to be imperiled. 

The efficiency of law enforcement has increased ma- 
terially, as shown by the fact that more crimes were 
cleared by arrests last year than in the previous year. 
While we have gained some measure of success, dangerous 
days lie ahead. Whatever the difficulties, we must and will 
fight on. The men of law enforcement in every sense of 
the word are soldiers at heart — brave and courageous, per- 
sistent and determined — and they are fighting a battle 
that must not be lost. 

This Nation in reality is waging war on two fronts. One 
is against the international purveyors of tyranny and 
barbarity that spring from the hellish hates of duplicity 
and chicanery which fester in chancelleries and palaces 
abroad. Their guns, bayonets, bombs, and tanks are aimed 
to crush the liberties of free people everywhere. Pillage, 
plunder, and destruction are their goal. 

The other front is against our enemies at home who are 
just as determined, just as ruthless. The war could be 



won at sea, in the air and land campaigns and yet be lost 
on the home front. We of law enforcement fight less con- 
spicuously, but our part of the conflict, like the other, 
affects every home in the land and every man on the 
foreign fighting fronts. 

As a people, our energies must be unified and di- 
rected toward final and glorious victory on the far-flung 
battle fronts of the world. Any activity which imperils that 
effort must be pushed aside. Life cannot go on as usual; 
we have a war to win. 

The real task of law enforcement, is the protector of 
law and order — the corner-stone of civilization, the very 
keystone of democracy. The only excuse for the existence 
of law enforcement is the protection of society. The gen- 
eral welfare of the people transcends the convenience of 
confirmed sex offenders, confidence men, check passers, 
arsonists, burglars, robbers and murderers. Yet it appears 
that at times the convenience of the criminal transcends 
the welfare of society in some circles. 

You know and I know that human lives are taken daily, 
homes are plundered, hard-earned life savings are stolen, 
and crimes by the score occur only because some gullible 
parole board or pardon dispenser has released upon society 
some unreformed criminal; or because some politically ex- 
pedient prosecutor lacks the fortitude to prosecute, or com- 
promises with defense counsel to allow the criminal to 
plead to a lesser offense though definitely guilty of the 
major crime; or because technical and capricious interpret- 
ation of statutes and rules of procedure theoretically takes 
the handcuffs from the criminal and places them upon law 
enforcement. When human jackals are loosed to prey upon 
society without even fundamental regard for the respon- 
sibilities of law enforcement, we should not hesitate to 
speak out. 

The attitude of law enforcement in this respect is not 
due to a spirit of avengement but arises simply and solely 
from considerations for the safety of society. I submit it 
is an obligation of judicial administration to see that 
justice is done, rather than an obligation looking toward 
preferential treatment of criminals. 

Law enforcement has gained much ground in the cru- 
sade against dishonesty and crime during the past de- 
cade, but recently we have suffered reverses. The present 
trend, unless abated, foretells difficult days ahead on the 
home front. We have the experience of the past to guide 
us. When law and order break down, you will find that 
public desire for law and order has first weakened. 

The American daily press and magazines worthy of 
their name have performed a great service for law and 
order. For the most part, they have made a sincere effort 
to focus the healing rays of the spotlight of public opin- 

(Continued on Page 40) 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Living Heroes of S. F. P. D. 

Broadcast by Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 



The following is a synopsis of a radio broadcast made 
recently by Deputy Chief Michael Riordan, entitled 
"Living Heroes." It was delivered over station KSFO, 
Austin B. Fenger, radio commentator for the station, con- 
ducted the broadcast. 

"We have with us tonight, Inspectors William Mc- 
Mahon and Frank P. McCann of the Robbery Detail. 
This detail is charged with the responsibility of receiving 
and investigating reports on robberies. They are also 
required to classify the modus operandi of the bandits, 
and then devise ways and means to halt their criminal 
activities. You will best realize their undertaking when I 
tell you that what shock troops are to the Army in actual 



"Living Hero No. 2 is Inspector Frank B. McCann. He 
has been decorated 9 times. McCann won his first laurels 
while patroling a beat in the vicinity of Sacramento and 
Larkin streets. During post-midnight hours he appre- 
hended the notorious taxicab bandit, "Blackie" Lawrence. 
Gun-fire was involved and that fine judge of sterling 
police material, the late Captain Duncan Matheson, after 
reviewing the accomplishments of this young officer, rec- 
ommended his transfer to the Bureau of Inspectors where 
he is now an honored member. 

"Living Hero No. 3 is Sergeant Joseph Engler, who re- 
ceived his baptism of gun-fire as a "rookey" radio car 
policeman in the Northern Police District. 






Inspector William McMahon 



Inspector Frank McCann 



Sergeant Joseph Engler 



combat, the Robbery Detail is to the San Francisco Police 
Department. 

"The dean of the heroic three that I am presenting is 
Inspector William McMahon. Out of his 23 years in the 
police department he has spent 22 in the Robbery Detail 
and whenever the bandit decides to come to San Francisco 
he must reckon with this inspector who has participated 
in the apprehension of practically all the "big shot" ban- 
dits in the past 22 years. To mention only a few who 
raised the white flag in recognition of his superiority are 
Bill O'Connor, the famous jewelry store robber; Buck 
Kelly, the desperado; Booth and Grant, the notorious 
bank robbers; Samsell and McNab, the inveterate yacht 
bandits; and the "Suntan" terror bandits Bishop, Chapelle, 
Icardo and Hayden. Inspector McMahon has been decor- 
ated 14 times for acts involving bravery and risk of life 
in the performance of police duty. I believe he is the most 
decorated policeman in the United States. What Eddie 
Rickenbacker was to the American Air Force in World 
War I and what Paddy Finucane was to the RAF in 
World War II, Bill McMahon is to our police department. 



"Much time could be devoted to the unfolding of the 
inspiring drama concerning the police life of these three 
men, but of necessity I must confine it to the apprehen- 
sion of gunmen Shenk and Avilano at 409 Divisadero 
Street. 

Might I also say to give the story a romantic touch 
that on the very date of this stickup the parents of a lovely 
Mission girl, Matilda Healy, had sent out announcements 
that on October 17, 1936, their daughter would be wedded 
to one Joseph Engler. Fate' decreed, however, that ban- 
dits would attempt to delay the plans of Cupid by shoot- 
ing the groom-to-be. The bullet penetrated his chest just 
over the heart and came out the back, bringing with it 
part of the officer's uniform. 

A hurried call of anxious parents recommended the 
postponing of the marriage ceremony. Final decision, 
however, required an interview in the hospital with the 
stricken hero. The doctors advised against any interview 
because of the serious wound and loss of blood, but some- 
how Joe learned with true police instinct that his fiancee 

(Continued on Page 33 J 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



Oakland's Efficient Police Department . . . 

Under Chief Robert P. Tracy, it has met many problems brought about by 
civilian defense, and tremendous population increase 



war. 



By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran Police Reporter of 
the Oakland Post-Enquirer Staff. 

Caught in the throes of the greatest industrial activity 
in its history, faced by an increase in population of more 
than 150,000, the Metropolitan Oakland Police Depart - 




Chief Robert P. Tracy 

ment, under Chief of Police Robert P. Tracy, recently ap- 
pointed to head the department, is solving every problem 
with which it has been presented. 

The war has brought its thousands of soldiers and 
sailors in camps in and on the edge of the city. 

Oakland's waterfront has been taken over by the army 
and the navy. 

Expansion after expansion of its industrial resources 
made necessary by the demand for more and more war 
materials, ships, machinery, engines for airplanes and mo- 
tive equipment, and a thousand and one other items that 
are needed to carry World War II to a successful con- 
clusion has changed the entire complexion of the great 
Eastbay community. 

And Oakland's police department has kept pace with 
the rapid changes, has kept crime to a minimum, has met 
the influx of newcomers from every state in the union by 
an ever tightening control over those spots where crime 
bobs up. 

In addition the department, under Chief Tracy has 
given special aid to the Oakland Defense program, fur- 



nishing a capable full-time police officer, Lieutenant Her- 
man Bernstein, to instruct the volunteer police force of 
the civilian defense set-up. 

The juvenile delinquency program is being vigorously 
met and a woman police officer has been added to juvenile 
detail and missing persons bureau in charge of Inspector 
E. C. Summers, a veteran in this type of work. • 

Perhaps the largest single improvement in making ef- 
fective the efforts of the police department was the recent 
installation of a $^0,000 two-way radio system, centering 
in the city hall. 

"The two-way radio has more than doubled the effi- 
ciency of the department," says Chief Tracy. "It has 
brought the entire force into closer contact with their 
superiors and their follow officers. It has speeded the 
apprehension of law breakers; it has solidified the morale 
of the department. And we are adding mobile units, dual- 
way radio equipped, just as fast as we can get the equip- 
ment. 

"For nearly two years the two-way radio system had 
been in the making but due to the priorities of war we had 
to be patient in getting the materials necessary. Now that 
hurdle is over and we're operating efficiently and well." 

"Oakland police department's two-way radio system 
was designed and installed under the direction of Ben 
Hill, superintendent of the city's electrical department 
and he did a splendid job," added Chief Tracy. 

In brief, here is the new two-way radio set-up for the 
Oakland police department, with provision made to pro- 
vide two-way communication with the San Francisco 
police department and other similar systems close by: 

The main station transmitters consist of one 250-watt 
and one 50-watt transmitter, each of the frequency modu- 
lated type designed to operate on a frequency of 31.1 
megocycles. The 50-watt transmitter is installed as a 
"standby" to be used only on failure of the main trans- 
mitter. 

There are 70 mobile units in operation at present. Each 
automobile is provided with a 2^ -watt frequency modu- 
lated transmitter transmitting on a frequency of 31.78 
megocycles and is equipped with a receiver to receive 
signals at 31.1 megocycles, keeping them in constant touch 
with headquarters. Each mobile has a radio control unit 
complete with a 'push-to-talk" microphone and one an- 
tenna. 

The radio control at central station is 13-feet long, %Yi 
feet high and provides operating space for five. At present 
there are six trained operators available, two for every 
eight hours of the 24-hour day and night. 

Each division headquarters — there are three in Oak- 
land — Central, Northern, Eastern, is provided with loud 

( Continued on Page 20 > 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page IJ 



State Peace Officers Meet In San Francisco 



The Second War Conference of the Peace Officers' 
Association of the State of California, which marks the 
23rd annual meeting of the Association, is scheduled to 
be held in San Francisco for three days, starting with Oc- 
tober 11th. 

The meetings will be held in the Fairmont Hotel, which 




Chief Alexander K. McAllister 
Association President 

will be the official headquarters during the three days' 
sessions. 

Not in the history of the Association has there been a 
more pressing need for the peace officers of this state to 
gather and discuss problems that have to do with the war 
effort, and cast eyes to what the future, following the 
war, has in store for our enforcement officials. 

To this end the program which has been arranged by 
President Alexander K. McAllister, Chief of Police of 
Sacramento, and Secretary James Drew, retired Chief of 
Police of Oakland, has been fashioned along these lines. 

Following is a partial list of subjects to be presented to 
the convention: 

"Operating a Police Department with Limited Per- 
sonnel." 

"Police Responsibilities in Highway Transportation." 

"Traffic Enforcement as a War Service." 

"Controlling Civil Disturbances." 

"Crime Prevention and Juvenile Delinquency." 

"Military Jurisdiction on Public Offenses." 

"Manpower and Selective Service." 

"Evaluation of Present Day Crime." 

There will also be other subjects as important and in- 
teresting as the above named. 

As Secretary Drew stated in his letter to members: 

"The efforts and time you expend in coming to San 



Francisco, will be worth while, this year more than any 
previous year, as law enforcement officials must collaborate 
to secure closer cooperation, efficient and effective opera- 
tion of our police agencies. 

"Do not miss this opportunity to meet and exchange 
your view with your fellow officers, and participate in the 
panel discussions by lending your advice and experience." 

Secretary Drew has arranged with the following hotels 
who have promised to reserve enough rooms for the ex- 
pected delegates to the conference : 

Fairmont, Mark Hopkins, Sir Francis Drake, Golden 
State, Stewart, Drake Wilshire, Manx, Bellevue, Plaza 
and Clift. 




Chief James Drew 
Secretary- Treasurer 

The officers of the Association this year are : 

President — Chief Alexander K. McAllister, Sacra- 
mento. 

First Vice President — Sheiff Carl F. Rayburn, River- 
side. 

Second Vice President — Chief Charles W. Dullea, San 
Francisco. 

Third Vice President — Sheriff George J. Overholt, 
Fresno. 

Fourth Vice President — Chief Harold A. Vogelsang, 
Stockton. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Former Chief James T. Drew, 
Oakland. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Sheriff H. P. Gleason, Alameda. 

Junior Past President — Sheriff Grattan M. Hogan, 
Modesto. 

Chief Dullea, host for the convention, is providing such 
proper entertainment that the present war conditions war- 
rant and the annual dinner will be staged in the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

Mayor Angelo J. Rossi will be on hand to welcome the 

(Continued on Page 16) 



Page i: 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



SHERIFF DANIEL C. MURPHY 

Announces Candidacy for Another Term 



Daniel Murphy, who is completing his second term as 
Sheriff of San Francisco, has announced his candidacy for 
re-election for a third term, at the coming election, No- 
vember 2. 

Very few men in this or any other city can point to a 




Sheriff Daniel Murphy 



career as full of success or who has, filled so many public 
offices with such efficiency and loyalty, or who has dedi- 
cated more time to the betterment of the working classes, 
not only through organized labor, but in the legislative hall 
of this state, as our present sheriff. 

Sheriff Murphy is a self-made man as far as his attain- 
ments are concerned, being one of many children, of a 
pioneer San Francisco family, he had to start in at an 
early age to make his way in his native city. His work 
finally landed him in the ranks of the Webb pressmen, 
and for many years he demonstrated his ability in this 
complex work on the old morning Call and later the eve- 
ning Call. In the Webb Pressmen's Union he held every 
office the organization had, and for his work in advancing 
the cause of Unionism he became an important factor in 
the American Federation of Labor, not only in San Fran- 
cisco and California, but throughout the United States. 

He has maintained his interest in the A. F. L. and at- 
tends all conventions and meetings of his local union. 

During the 20's he served as a State Senator from this 
city, and he sponsored much legislation of a humanitarian 
nature. Later he served as president of the State Board 
of Education and of the San Francisco Board of Educa- 
tion. 

When he was first elected sheriff he was a vice-presi- 



dent of the Bank of America, a position he held for a 
number of years. 

In his election as sheriff eight years ago he received the 
largest vote of any candidate for a contested office in the 
history of San Francisco. 

As sheriff he points to his record of the past two terms 
with pride. He abolished the collection of fees for trans- 
porting people to the various state institutions, substituted 
a commissary where various articles were sold at low cost 
to the inmates of our county jails, instead of "farming 
out" this privilege to a concessionaire, and he has intro- 
duced many innovations in his administration that have 
worked to the benefits of the people of this city. 

Sheriff Murphy has been a president of the Sheriffs' 
Association of California, is first vice-president of the 
Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association, is a member of 
the State Peace Officers' Association, and has been promi- 
nently identified in various phases of civilian defense 
work. 

He is an orator of great ability, and his voice has been 
heard on many important subjects, always for the better- 
ment of the public, especially of those who toil for a 
living. 

The sheriff states that if elected for another term he 
will continue the same policies that have made his office 
a standout. 



FBI OFFERS POSITIONS 

An appeal for candidates for positions in the FBI, both 
in Washington and in San Francisco, was made here 
yesterday by Nat J. L. Pieper, special agent in charge of 
the San Francisco FBI offices. 

Because of the tremendous increase in work of the FBI 
due to the war, Pieper, said, hundreds of potential opera- 
tives are needed. These jobs, which are open to men only, 
pay a starting salary of $3,828 yearly, Pieper said. 

There are posts open for women in the Bureau head- 
quarters and laboratories in Washington, Pieper said. 
These positions require a college degree and pay accord- 
ingly. 



1 BACK THE ! 

[ ATTACK [ 

i . i 

l Buy War Bonds : 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman J. Schwandt, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers Association was held at the Sac- 
ramento Hotel in Sacramento, August 12, 1943. The 
meeting was arranged for by Sgt. E. H. McKee of the 
California Highway Patrol. A very appetizing lunch was 
enjoyed by all. 

The meeting was called to order by President Geo. 
Burton at 1:15 p. m. The members and visitors were in- 
troduced; then the minutes of the previous meeting were 
read and approved. 

A discussion followed on relay of former letter to FCC 
by Lewis and Hossack. A motion was made by Frank 
Winters that J. M. Lewis investigate the interpretation 
of relaying messages with the FCC. Carried. 

Merrill LeBoeuf requested by motion that an okeh be 
given on Radio Frequency 39-380 AM for Colusa Co., 
Sutter Co., and Yuba Co., for mobile units. Seconded by 
Lewis and carried. 

The Woodland Police Department requested an okeh 
on Radio Frequency 35-220 AM for a mobile unit. A 
motion was made by LeBoeuf and seconded by Don 
Hossack that an okeh be granted. Carried. 

Winters spoke on the coming National Convention at 
Madison, Wisconsin. A motion was made by Winters, sec- 
onded by LeBoeuf, that letters be sent to Police Chiefs 
and Sheriff's in our area requesting them to pool finances 
in order to send as many members to convention as pos- 
sible. Carried. A committee was appointed to draft letter 
for same. 

The following new members were accepted : 

A. J. Silva, Technician, California Highway Patrol, 
Sacramento; Harold H. Winzenried, Radio Technician, 
Oakland Police Department, Oakland; Homer Jones, Ra- 
dio Technician, Oakland Police Department, Oakland; 
E. W. Lindfeldt, Radio Technician, Sacramento Police 
Department, Sacramento; Joseph H. Carleton, Radio 
Technician, Sacramento Police Department, Sacramento. 

A few words were spoken by John T. Hinkel, Wake 
Island occupant when it was shelled and bombed by our 
little brown enemies. 

A general round-table discussion of 20 minutes was 
enjoyed by all. 

Frank Winters asked for the next meeting at San 
Francisco. Seconded by Dan McNeil. Carried. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2 : 50 p. m. 

MEMBERS AND VISITORS PRESENT 
Geo. E. Burton Henri Kirby 



R. V. La Rue 
Lloyd F. McKinney 
Geo. W. Colby 
J. M. Lewis 
Don T. Wood 
F. W. Hughes 
E. S. Naschke 
E. W. Lindfeldt 
C. A. Pearson 
C. D. Balton 
J. H. Carleton 
A. J. Silva 
Merrill LeBoeuf 
Frank E. Winters 
Neil F. Marvin 
David Hendrickson 



Frank J. Matjasich 
Geo. Maxey 
Ed. H. Bertola 
Dan J. McNeil 
J. M. Ruys 
Don S. Hills 
C. H. Cross 
John T. Hinkel 
J. D. Hossack 
Wm. V. Stancil 
E. H. McKee 
Chas. E. Halstead, Jr. 
Mott Brunton 
Del S. Crosby 
Don La Fortune 



H. J. Schwandt 



Henry L. Bogardus 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at the 
Venetian Restaurant at San Francisco, September 9, 1943. 
The meeting was arranged for by Director Frank E. Win- 
ters of the San Francisco Police Department. A very ap- 
petizing Italian lunch was enjoyed by all at 12:15 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by President George 
Burton at 1:10 P. M. 

Minutes of the previous meeting were read and cor- 
rected as follows: The Radio Frequency for Colusa, Sut- 
ter, and Yuba counties should read 39-380 Key F.M. in- 
stead of A.M. The correction was requested by Merrill 
LeBoeuf. 

Lewis reported on a letter from FCC of Washington, 
D. C. Discussion by McMurphy, Winters, and Lewis on 
relays. Director Winters is to confer with Sloan at FCC 
Office in San Francisco regarding relays. 

McMurphy spoke on monitoring KPO for Radio Si- 
lence, and suggested that we set up our own control sta- 
tion. A motion was made that a committee be appointed 
to investigate the possibility of establishing control of our 
own Radio Silence. 

At 1 :50 P. M. the meeting was ordered closed to all but 
paid-up members for the general good of the order. 

Motion by Lewis, seconded by McMurphy that Chief 
Walter Wfsnom be voted in as an honorary member. Mo- 
tion carried. 

President Burton appointed Wm. H. Harrington to 
serve as a member of the Board of Directors for the re- 
mainder of 1943. 

Discussion followed on honorary membership. 
(Continued on Page 22) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



Police Protegees — School Safety Patrol Boys 
— Win Praise at Annual Review 

This was written by the Editor of Motorland, California Auto Division's Special Publication. 



Marking the twentieth anniversary of a youth and 
safety movement sparked by the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, the 4,000 boys of the city's School Safety Pa- 
trol received public plaudits and official tribute when 




Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea (center) heads annual 
parade of School Safety Patrol of which he is Colonel, and is 
flanked by (left) Acting Traffic Captain Edward Pootel and 
(right) Inspector Byron J. Getchell. veteran instructor of Patrol 
which is sponsored by the San Francisco Police Department, 
Board of Education. Parent-Teacher groups and the California 
State Automobile Association. 

they marched, May 27, in the annual Patrol parade held 
at Civic Center. 

The oldest organisation of its kind in the country, the 
San Francisco School Safety Patrol came into existence 
in 192 3 through the joint efforts of the San Francisco 
Police Department, Board of Education and the sponsor- 
ing California State Automobile Association. It like- 
wise has the strong support of Parent-Teacher groups. 

During its existence, the Patrol has sustained an un- 
broken record of no accident to a school child at a pa- 
trolled crossing; a record believed unequalled in a metro- 
politan area. 

It was this record as well as the anniversary that city 
Patrol members celebrated this year in the impressive re- 
view in front of the City Hall and at the assembly held 
in the Civic Auditorium where official thanks of the city 
was paid the 4,000 lads for their unselfish public service 
and where ribbons of merit were awarded Patrols for 
outstanding duty performed. 

And, back of the impressive parade and the equally 
colorful assembly was the personal interest of Chief of 
Police Charles W. Dullea, Patrol Colonel, and the un- 
tiring work of Police Inspector Byron J. Getchell who, 
for the past seventeen years has guided the activities of 
the Patrol as instructor. His assistant is Officer Joseph T. 
Kane. 



And, this year the parade was bigger and better with 
the United States Army being represented in the re- 
viewing stand. 

Eleven battalions representing 120 public and pa- 
rochial schools and with as many bands from junior high 
schools took part in the impressive spectacle. They swung 
down Polk street past the reviewing stand in front of the 
City Hall with military cadence to receive the salutes of 
high ranking civic and Army officials and the plaudits of 
parents and friends lining sidewalks. 

In the reviewing stand and on the platform in the 
Civic Auditorium were: Walter J. McGovern, Presi- 
dent, San Francisco Police Commission and representing 
Mayor Angelo J. Rossi; Chief of Police Charles W. 
Dullea; Lieut. Col. Lloyd F. Harris, U.S.A., representing 
Lieut. Gen. John L. De Witt, commandant of West- 
ern Defense Command, Fourth Army; William P. Wob- 
ber and Ward G. Walkup, members, San Francisco 
Police Commission; Jesse Colman, President, Board of 
Supervisors; Harry I. Christie, President, Board of Ed- 
ucation; Joseph P. Nourse, Superintendent of Public 
Schools; Rt. Rev. Monsignor James O'Dowd, Superin- 
tendent of Parochial Schools; Rev. Vincent I. Breen, As- 
sistant Superintendent of Parochial Schools; Albert D. 
Graves, Deputy Superintendent of Public Schools; Ed- 







Receiving salutes of marching School Safety Patrol from re- 
viewing stand are: (left to right) Chief of Police Charles W. 
Dullea, patrol colonel; Lieut. Col. Lloyd F. Harris, U.S.A., rep- 
resenting Lieut. Gen. John L. DeWitt, commanding Western 
Defense Command: Edwin S. Moore, California State Auto- 
mobile Association; Walter ]. McGovern, William P. Wobber 
and Ward G. Walkup. Police Commissioners. 

win S. Moore, Acting Chairman, Public Safety De- 
partment, California State Automobile Association; Act- 
ing Captain Edward Pootel, Commanding the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Police Department; Mrs. Harry 
W. Thomas, President, Second District, California Con- 
gress of Parents and Teachers; Mrs. William E. Burns, 
(Continued on Page 23) 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15- 



Lieut. James English to War Council 



Lieutenant James English of the San Francisco Police 
Department has been selected to become Assistant Director 
of the local Civilian War Council. Thus another officer of 
the police department, because of his ability, experience and 
character has been given recognition by being placed in a 




Lieutenant James Enclish 

position of responsibility outside of law enforcement. 

Lieutenant English, has been granted a leave of absence 
by Police 'Commissioner Walter McGovern, William P. 
Wobber and Ward G. Walkup, the request having been 
made by Chief of Police Charles Dullea. 

Very few members of the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, or any other department, have achieved a record of 
efficiency, and taken advantage of the opportunities of ad- 
vancement offered those who possess ambition, set them- 
selves to studying for promotional examinations and at the 
same time fullfil their duties as a peace officer. 

Lieutenant English joined the department in October 
1928. He was made corporal in November, 1931, a ser- 
geant on May 11, 1937, and was appointed a lieutenant 
on May 12, 1942. 

He was assigned to the Bureau of Inspectors a little 
less than ten years ago, and for over six years was on the 
Pawnshop Detail under Lieutenant Sam Miller. He was 
appointed an assistant inspector April 30, 1936, and was 
made inspector on December 29, 1939. 

There are two citations for commendable action on his 
membership card in the police department. On October 
26, 1933, he arrested two holdup men who had pulled a 
series of robberies in this town. He got the two men 
single-handed. 

On August 1, 1933, the citation reads he engaged in 
a pistol duel with an ex-convict named Stanley Abernathy 
and though fired on by the bad man, English got a bullet 
that put Mr. Abernathy out of circulation. This fight 
took place around Mission and Third streets. 



Another instance of his being always on the job is the 
arrest of the burglar from Los Angeles who prowled the 
movie actors' and actresses' homes in the fashionable 
Belair district. Inspector English picked up the burglar 
who had gotten away with $81,000 worth of loot. 

Lieutenant English is married and he and his wife have 
a young daughter, Jean Carol. 

A quiet, unassuming young man, Lieutenant English 
is very popular with his fellow officers, and among the 
people he has had to deal with during his years on the 
Pawnshop Detail he is highly respected. All these feel, as 
this writer does, that the War Council made a very wise 
selection in placing him in charge of proctective activities 
of that body. 



SERGEANT WILLIAM WARD'S 
NARROW ESCAPE 

Stewart Dean, 18 year old wiper in the Merchant Ma- 
rine, got himself intoxicated one day last month, and ran 
amok after a quarrel with his parents. He threatened to 
shoot them, neighbors stated, and they sent for the police. 
Sergeant William Ward and Officer Vincent Gould of 
the Northern Station responded. 

As Sergeant Ward started to enter the apartment in 
which Dean was waiting, he was fired on by the youth 
who stood at the head of the stairs. Ward was hit in the 
chest and fell back down two flights of stairs. Officer 
Gould was on the job, and although Sergeant Tom Mar- 
lowe and Officer Mervyn Chioino were on the spot imme- 
diately after Ward hit the lower landing, they found as 
they climbed the stairs that Gould had overpowered the 
would-be murderer. 

Sergeant Ward was treated at the Central Emergency 
Hospital and removed to the San Francisco Hospital where 
he still is confied. He is on the way to recovery thanks to 
the poor marksmanship of the youthful assaulter. 

Sergeant Ward is one of the city's outstanding police- 
men, for during the many years he has worked in the 
Northern and what was formerly the Bush District he has 
met up with many instances that called for cool and fear- 
less conduct. As in the last instance, when he was wound- 
ed, he met every call with a courage that has won him 
high commendation from his superiors. 



BAyview 2022 



Res. BAyview 2229 



HEYMAN BROTHERS, INC. 



REAL ESTATE — INSURANCE 



513S Geary Boulevard 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATwater 0176 

OSWALD MACHINE WORKS 

GENERAL MACHINE WORKS 

Diesel pnd Gas Engine Repairs — Stern Bearings and Propeller Work 

956 Evans Avenue San Francisco, California 

CLEANERS OF QUALITY 

BORELLO'S CLEANING & DYEING CO. 



2695 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 



RAndolph 8535-8536 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Pdse 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers* Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA _ 

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POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 3 



A KINDLY ACT 

It is a common thing to have police officers characterized 
as hard, unsympathetic and calloused persons, but if peo- 
ple knew how many kindly acts members of the depart- 
ment perform week after week, this attitude would be 
changed. 

The following is an instance in point, and this writer 
knows plenty of others, though many of the recipients 
never write anything about it, sending money they got 
from a police officer without much more than thanks or 
they return it in person and give their expression of ap- 
preciation to the officer. 

One September 7th, two Berkeley lads came over to 
Playland at the Beach, and as boys will do they spent 
all their money and when it came time to get a car and 
return home they found they were without funds. They 
were in a tough spot. However, they went up to two 
policemen and explained their predicament. The police- 
men asked how much they needed to get home and one 
boy said 30 cents and the other said 20 cents, and forth- 
with this money was provided. So elated were the lads 
they forgot to get the names of their benefactors, but the 
mother of one of them attended to that. 

She wrote the following letter to Chief of Police 
Charles W. Dullea, who turned it over to Captain Francis 
McGuire of the Richmond Police Station and Captain 



McGuire found that the two men were Officers Oakley 
Cook and Erling Rolandson. 

The letter was as follows: 

Dear Chief: 

On September 7, our son John Sanford and his friend, 
Skip Costello, went to spend the day at Playland out at 
the Beach. When it came time to think about coming 
home they discovered they had spent all their money. 
They appealed to two policemen at Playland, and they 
were given enough money to get them back to Berkeley. 
I believe one of the men contributed thirty cents and the 
other twenty cents. But the boys failed to get the names 
of their rescuers. 

Will you be good enough to find out who the officers 
on duty that afternoon were, and give them the money, 
with the enclosed note from the boys, together with our 
thanks for making it possible for the boys to return home 
without delay. We are extremely grateful. 

Sincerely yours, 

Mary M. Sanford, 
932 Hilldale Avenue, Berkeley. 

Each boy enclosed a note of thanks to which was at- 
tached the money each had been advanced. 



A GOOD THING TO REMEMBER 

The following copy of an All Points Teletype Bulletin, 
read to all watches of the Police Department. It was sent 
by Honorable Robert W. Kenny, Attorney General of 
California : 

"The Commanding General of the Western De- 
fense Command and Fourth Army, Presidio of San 
Francisco, California, has advised that he is extremely 
interested in being kept informed of the presence of per- 
sons of Japanese ancestry who enter prohibited zones 
in violation of the law, and would be very grateful if all 
state law enforcement agencies would keep the proper 
military authorities informed of the presence of any 
persons of this character. 

"May I therefore request each of you as peace offi- 
cers of this state to be most diligent in informing the 
military authorities of the presence of any and all 
persons of Japanese ancestry who may enter or be found 
in any prohibited zone within your jurisdiction without 
evidence of proper authorization. Such information 
should be sent by telegraph or telephone to: 
Civil Affairs Division, Western Defense Command and 

Fourth Army, Presidio of San Francisco, California. 
—ROBERT W. KENNY, Attorney General, 
State of California." 



STATE PEACE OFFICERS TO MEET 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 

('Continued from Page 1 1 ) 
peace officers of the state to this meeting, and Governor 
Earl Warren, one of the charter members of the Asso- 
ciation, is scheduled for a speech. 

The wives and daughters of the visitors will be taken 
care of by a committee headed by Mrs. Dullea. 



September, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



JUDGE GEORGE HARRIS ABSOLVES 
OFFICER DOWD 

In dismissing charges against Officer William Dowd, of 
the Communications Bureau, caused when he shot and in- 
jured Donald Smith, a member of the U. S. Navy, last 
July, Judge George B. Harris presented the following mem- 
orandum which better explains the ramifications of the case 
and the cause of the dismissal. 

The several complaints filed against the defendant, Wil- 
liam Dowd, are, and each of them is, dismissed. 

The evidence produced by the prosecution discloses that 
the defendant Dowd while acting in line of duty in mak- 
ing an arrest as a police officer was attacked by John Wil- 
kins and Donald Smith, they being at the time admittedly 
intoxicated. 

Both Wilkins and Smith freely stated on the witness 
stand that although they knew that Dowd was acting as 
such police officer, nevertheless they advanced upon and 
toward him in a threatening manner, finally pinioned 
him against a light pole and intended to and did inflict 
bodily punishment upon him. 

After defendant Dowd extricated himself from this 
perilous position, where his head and body were being 
shoved violently against the pole, the said Smith and his 
companion continued their advance, intending by their 
own admission to "beat him up." Dowd, in order to avoid 
serious bodily injury at their hands, retreated along the 
street some twenty-five additional feet and at this junc- 
ture he, Dowd, drew his revolver and pointed the same 
toward the sidewalk more in the nature of a warning to 
his attackers. 

Smith at this point, according to the evidence, contin- 
ued the advance in order to wrest the revolver from Dowd. 
The revolver was discharged and as a result Smith was 
wounded. He has since fully recovered from the injury 
received. 

The conduct of Dowd was justified in view of the fore- 
going facts. The law applicable to a police officer in such 
situation is well-settled. In People vs. Dowd, 36 Cal. 
App. 589 at 594, the court said: "An officer properly 
engaged in attempting to make an arrest in such a case 
has the right to resist attack upon him and being rightfully 
there and not legally considered the aggressor, may in his 
own defense take life." (Also to the same effect: People 
vs. Hardwic\, 204 Cal. 582; 3 A. L. R. 1174; People vs. 
Zuc\erman, 56 A. C. A. 409, 415.) 

The testimony of several disinterested witnesses, apart 
from the facts elicited from Wilkins and Smith, demon- 
strates that Dowd, as such police officer, was fully justi- 
fied in the .course of conduct which he was compelled to 
and did pursue. 



LIEUTENANTS RE-ASSIGNED 

Effective September 2nd, Chief Charles W. Dullea 
made the following transfers and assignments in the police 
department: 

Lieutenant Jack Eker, Co. J to Co. E. and Lieutenant 
Walter S. Ames, Co. G to Co. J. 



HOME CANNING HELPS 

SAVE FOOD FOR 

FUTURE USE 



Prudent homemakers are busy now 
canning fruits and vegetables for the 
coming winter months when these 
commodities will be scarce. This is not 
only wise but it is also patriotic. The 
needs of our armed forces and lend- 
lease allies are taking most of the com- 
mercial fruit and vegetable pack. 
Home canned products will be a big 
help to supplement the use of ration 
books. 

Home canning is not an easy chore. 
It requires the utmost in care and cau- 
tion, beginning with the selection of 
suitable fruits and vegetables, on 
through the different processes of 
cooking, sterilizing and sealing jars, 
until the final storage. Improper can- 
ning is a waste of critical food sup- 
plies. Also it is extremely dangerous 
to the family's health. 

Call at any of the company's offi- 
ces and procure a copy of our free 
home canning pamphlet. It may serve 
as a helpful guide. 



Don't Fail to Buy 
War Stamps and Bonds 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



Owned - Operated - Managed 

bf Californium • 



P J CE 9-943 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



OAKLAND'S POLICE BALL 
Saturday Night October 2nd 

Oakland's Police Department's Twenty-Eighth Annual 
Ball and Entertainment is scheduled for Saturday night, 
October 2nd, in the big municipal auditorium arena. 

For the second consecutive year, Sergeant E. O. Stein- 
bach, heads the ball committee as general chairman. 

Sergeant Steinbach is also president of the Widows' and 
Orphans' Aid Association of the department, under whose 
direction the annual event has been staged over the years. 

As was done last year, proceeds of the ball and enter- 
tainment will be devoted to the purchase of war bonds. 

"We expect the largest attendance in our history," 
said General Chairman Steinbach," and we have prepared 
a program of music not only for dancing, but also to sup- 
port an outstanding entertainment program of widely 
known artists of radio, screen and the legitimate stage." 

Assistant General Chairman is Patrolman Daune E. 
Harper. Heading the reception committee is Chief of 
Police Robert P. Tracy, with Captain Thorvald Brown as 
assistant. 

Other committees comprise: 

Transportation — Lieutenant Lester J. Divine, Sergeant 
Pierre Van de Weil. 

Printing — Sergeant Guy D. Skelton, Patrolman James 
J. Mangini. 

Uniform Reception — Lieutenant Ora E. Rhodes, Ser- 
geant Wallace W. Hewitt, Jr. 

Decoration — Inspector Anthony Bolger, Inspector Dan- 
iel Murphy. 

Entertainment and Music — Sergeant Earl Risedorph, 
Patrolman George W. Quellich. 

Floor — Sergeant Harold B. Richardson, Patrolman 
Martin R. Hansen. 

Box Office — Patrolman George M. Kroll, Patrolman 
Eugene L. Cleu. 

Program — Sergeant Herbert E. Backert, Sergeant Clif- 
ford A. Hatch. 

Officers of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 
besides its president, Sergeant Steinbach are: Lieutenant 
James P. McDonnell, vice-president; Inspector Louis F. 
Agnew, recording secretary; Patrolman George L. Burke, 
financial secretary; Inspector William Marshall, treasurer; 
Inspector Eugene F. Murphy, Captain Frederick R. Bar- 
beau, Sergeant Clifford A. Hatch, Patrolman Samuel B. 
Montell, directors. 

Advance ticket sales at $1.00 per person are ample 
insurance of a packed house, according to General Chair- 
man Steinbach. 



Compliments of 

ELK BOWL 

BOWLING 

1810 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 0874 From San Francisco Call ENterprise 10966 

WESTERN FORGE & TOOL WORKS 

Quality Forging Since 1921 
209 JEFFERSON STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones: TEmplebar 1741, 1742 



1. F. Schiller, Store Mgr. 



PAY LESS DRUG STORE 

The Store That Sells For Less Every Day in the Week 
Films - Liquors - Tobaccos - Prescriptions - Photo Finishing 



1901 TELECRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



DANCELAND — 409 12TH STREET 

WALT'S 405 CLUB - ROSE ROOM 

SO Beautiful Girls 



405 I2TH STREET 431 I2TH STREET 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Ralph Jordan Ray Cadera C. O. Buttlar Dan Morrison 

Phone TEmplebar 9110 

CHARLIE'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



25 11 TELECRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



Sunol 8C Manning Dental Laboratory 



OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone TEmplebar 9005-9006 



Edna Butterworth 



THE GRAY SHOP 



Smart Apparel for Women 



ADOLPH W. GROZER 



2669 FRUITVALE AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



2000 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Every Afternoon at 2:00 o'clock 



Every Evening Except Friday 



ALLEN'S WHIST CLUB 

Many Worthwhile Prizes 



104 1 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



September, 194i 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



STATE LEADS NATION IN AUTO 
REGISTRATION 

California's motor vehicle registration for 1942 topped 
all other states, according to an analysis of recent statistics 
announced today by the California State Automobile As- 
sociation. 

The state's registration of 3,080,444 last year included 
2,617,853 passenger cars, 216,955 commercial vehicles, 
187,431 trailers, 19,913 motorcycles, and 38,292 vehicles 
exempt from registration fees, according to State Depart- 
ment of Motor Vehicles records. 

Figures reported for all states by the United States 
Public Roads Administration show California's registra- 
tion for the year declined a fraction less than two per cent 
from 1941, while the average decline throughout the na- 
tion was five and one-half per cent. These figures show 
California some 320,000 ahead of New York in second 
place, this first-place position having been held for several 
years past. 

Phone GArfield 6879 

M. B. McGOWAN, INC. 

Pile Foundations - Wharves - Bridges 



625 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

SOMERTON RESTAURANT 

SAN FRANCISCO 
GOD LOVES A BOOSTER 

SAM HOUSTON 

Says: "America First, the World Afterwards 

Meet Me at MUSEUM, 1118 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 925 7 



Better Barbecues Eats 



CHIEF BARBECUE — Coney Island Red Hots 

Specializing in Barbecued Chickens, Pork, Lamb, Ham, Etc. 

1236-38 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



THE CUDAHY PACKING COMPANY 

222 THIRD STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone CLencourt 0740 We Deliver Anywhere Leo Baum. Pharmacist 

LEO'S NORMAL PHARMACY 

Drugs, Sundies, Kodaks, Surgical Supplies - Prescriptions a Specialty 
1 101 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phones — Oakland: TEmplebar 1023 San Francisco: UNderhill 2323 

GRANDMA BAKING COMPANY 

Bakers of Fine Cakes 

335 ADELINE STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 5 52 3 Beauty Parlor Equipment Contract Mfg. 

L. NEWMAN 

Tool, Die and Machine Work - Designing and Metal Stamping 

1001 24TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone OLympic 4886 

RAMPONE BROS. 

Produce Merchants 
856 60TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



COATS • DRESSES • SLACKS 

SILBERBERG'S 



THE SHOP OF EXCLUSIVE DRESS CREATIONS 
BEAUTY SHOP — Mezzanine Floor PRospect 5293 

EDDY at TAYLOR STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WE HAVE CASH BUYERS FOR YOUR PROPERTY 

GRIDLEY REALTY CO. 

if Quick Action, Dependable Service ■*- 
4324 Geary Bcu'.evard near 8-h Avenue SKyline 8154 



MISS JANE HANSON 

BAY AREA NUTRITION CENTER 
214 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

Phone EXbrook 73 84 

ELINOR'S, INC., GOWNS 

285 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

EMERALD H. CHARONATT 



Phone Mission 9581 



Famous Chinese and American Foods 



GEORGE'S SHRIMP PALACE 

AND CAFE 
Dining and Dancing . . . Special zing in Banquets 

Famous Chinese and American Foods 
2624 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

Teleph ne 03dway 7277 

HOTEL RITZ 

Mrs. E. A. Mayer, Manager 
216 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, 2, CALIF. 

EDDIE GR1GG, JR.. Proprietor Telephone 3-6101 

MORRIS AND SCANLON 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 

226 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



HOTEL KIRKLAND 



1701 LONGMAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATwater 6595 S. W. Ferrier & Sons 

ATLAS CEMENT TRAY CO. 

Manufacturers of 

GUARANTEED CEMENT LAUNDRY TPAYS 

30 ANDREW STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone San Mateo 5- 1628 



Homes For Sale 



SAN MATEO INVESTMENT CO. 

Home Builders - Real Estate 



2562 EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



RA-dolph 9683 "FRESH EGGS" 

MISSION FARM POULTRY 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 
SS01 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC TANK 8C PIPE CO. 



4601 TIDEWATER STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

DALE HOTEL 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 10) 
speaker listening facilities which permit them to listen to 
both sides of all police radio broadcasts. 

In addition, there is a two-way loud speaker intercom- 
munication system in each division headquarters and the 
dispatcher. 

Continuous recording is provided by a sound recorder 
and amplifier for the audiolog and permits four hours of 
continuous recording on one record, and works automati- 
cally. 

There are five separate antennas in the system. 

The main antenna is installed on the city hall flag pole. 

Three pick-up antennas are installed in the foothills on 
self-sustaining steel poles. They provide insurance of a 
strong signal from police mobiles in any part of the city. 

After three months of operations, Chief Tracy an- 
nounces a 20 per cent reduction in juvenile delinquency 
among high school girls as the result of appointment of 
Policewoman Miss Kathryn Conway to the juvenile 
bureau. 

"Working out a scientific pattern to check girl absen- 
tees from classrooms," said Chief Tracy, "Miss Conway 
traced most of the 'class cutters' to questionable environ- 
ment, investigated many individual cases, and by proper 
guidance, restored many to the path of good society. Miss 

Phone HIgate 1473 Established 1873 

BARR BROS. CO. 

Makers of Needles, Cutlery, Edged Tools, Drop Forgings 
15 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phones: HIgate 7753-7754-7755 

THOS. CARTER GLASS CO. 

Plate and Window Glass - Automobile Glass 
333 9TH STREET, between Webster and Harrison Sts OAKLAND 
Phone Hlghgate 4962 

STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 



Complete Home Furnishings 



PHOENIX IRON WORKS 

Castings Since 1901 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Congratulations from BOB TRACY and FRED ANTON, SR. 

OAKLAND UMBRELLA FACTORY 



1617 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 9401 Mary Ariza, Manager 

VI'S BEAUTY PARLOR 

All branches of Beauty Culture - Expert Permanent Waving 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



620 FOURTEENTH STREET 



Phone HIgate 1092 



BAY CITY IRON WORKS 

Engineers and Machinists 



FOURTH and WASHINGTON STREETS 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



PROF. WONG YEEN 

Herb Preparation For AH Ailments 
Hours: 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 



409 10TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 1343 



Atlas Heating and Ventilating Co., Ltd. 

Everything in Heating 



145 1 32ND STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 1312 



Flat Glass of All Kinds 



COBBLEDICK-KIBBE GLASS CO. 

Distributors Libby-Owens-Ford Products - Art Glass - Safety Glass 
WASHINGTON at THIRD STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TRinidad 6000 

BOORMAN LUMBER COMPANY 



Lumber and Mill Work 



10035 E. 14TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 9828 

SANITARY LAUNDRY 

We Specialize in All Classes of Laundry 

3830 MANILA AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



54 1 I ITH STREET at Clay 



OAKLAND. CALIF. Phone TEmplebar 2 792 



Day and Night Service 



Phone TEmplebar 0845-0846 



Leonard Finkel 



LINCOLN-CHESTERFIELD MFG. CO. 

Complete Home Furnishings - Factory to You 

91 TWELFTH STREET. Opposite New Court House OAKLAND 

FOR GOOD CHEER 

RAINIER 

Beer and Ale 

Phone GLencourt 1814 

S. KULCHAR 8C CO. 

Fine Cabinet Works - Store and Bank Fixtures 
Mill and Office: 8TH AVE. and E. 1 0TH ST. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 1218 

D. W. DURANT 

Plumbing - Heating - General Jobbing - Estimates Furnished 
1012 WEBSTER STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



FILIPELLI BAIL BOND CO. 

Federal and Immigration Bonds - Cash Bail 



520 FIFTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 8364 

SWAN PHARMACY 

Specialists in Herbs and Herb Remedies for 50 Years 
54 7 8TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



MAC'S PLACE 

Lunches, Tamales and Chili Beans 

3449 FRU1TVALE AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 4916 



Dr. A. E. Slagerman, Mgr. 



DR. J. A. CAMPBELL 

DENTISTS 



490 THIRTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 9588 



Free Parking at 13th and Franklin Sts. 



SEA CAVE SEA FOODS 

Specializing in Sea Foods for Forty Years - Quality Steaks and Chops 

Cocktail Lounge - Banquet Rooms - Private Booths 
441 TWELFTH ST. - Also entrance at 1132 Broadway OAKLAND 



Phone Piedmont 1826 

PIEDMONT LUMBER 8c MILL CO. 



35 1 FORTIETH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Conway is a trained psychologist worker to aid the ju' 
venile and missing person detail. An ounce of prevention 
is worth a pound of apprehension and Miss Conway's 
efforts have proved it." 

To keep pace with the ever-growing demand on the 
police dapartment, Chief Tracy, under city council reso- 
lution, has placed 50 emergency police officers in uniform 
without civil service rating. They will hold the jobs for 
the duration and then may take the examination. 

Passing such examinations they will be subject to perma- 
nent appointment and "it looks like we will need these 
men just as much after the war is over as we do now," 
commented Chief Tracy. 

Chief Tracy has also inaugurated a thorough course in 
the use of firearms, pistols, rifles, tommy guns, tear gas 
guns, shotguns, gas masks and is putting every one of the 
435 members of the department through intensive train- 
ing in groups of 3 5 to 40. 

The work has been placed in charge of Sergeant Cliff 
A. Hatch, president of the Oakland Police and Firemen's 
Pistol and Rifle Club. 

Altogether the Oakland police department is doing a 
splendid bit of work in protecting the lives and property 
of its citizens and is receiving fine commendation from 
both the navy and army, as well as the city council, civic 
groups and industrial plants. 

Phone ANdover 2527 FOOK SANC CO. 

COLUMBUS MARKET 

Meats, Vegetables and Fruits - Wholesale - Retail 
1448 23RD AVENUE, Cor. E. 15th St. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



WINE Open Evenings and Sunday 

VALLEY MARKET 

Groceries, Fruit and Vegetables - Delicatessen 



BEER 



3615 FOOTHILL BLVD 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

EXCELSIOR FOOD CENTER 

Nick Dell Isola 
4626 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone RAndolph 2760-2761 Free Delivery Quality and Service 

Granada Grocery & Fruit Market 

In Excelsior Meat Market - Quality Fruits, Vegetables, Poultry, Fish 



4638 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone LA. 5-9978 Guido Cristefani. Manager 

FRANK'S 663 CLUB 

SAN PABLO AVENUE ALBANY, CALIF. 

Phon= TEmplebar 5 5 03 Established 1869 

THE OAKLAND PLANING MILL 

Millwork, Sash and Doors - Hardwoods 
105 WASHINGTON STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

California Builders Supply Co., Ltd. 



700 SIXTH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 1688 

L. F. WITHARM 

Sheet Metal and Heating - Coal, Oil, Gas Furnaces 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



DR. THOS. H. PETERS 

OPTOMETRIST 
2611 Telegraph Avenue - HIgate 1474-S 

430 Seventh Street - GLencourt 6375 
3S34 East 14th Street - KEllog 3-6076 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone GLencourt 1889 Res. Phone HIgate 6089 

HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 

Tops - Painting - Towing - Radiators - Fenders 

A COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 

23RD AND WEBSTER STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone OLympic 5208 

GENERAL ROOFING CO. 



Office and Warehouse: 
35 10 PERALTA STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 0443 



R. W. D1LLEY 



METAL REPAIR WORKS 



Specialty Welding 



3 119 MARKET STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



OAKLAND CANNING COMPANY 

Packers of Canned Fruit and Vegetables 

FOOT OF NINTH AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 5466 Expert Repairing Our Specialty 

OAKLAND CYCLERY 

Bicycles New and Rebuilt - Velocipedes and Sundries 

1739 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TWinoaks 3866 

HANK AND FRANK 

East Bay's Leading Bicycle Academy 
For Fun and Economy . . . Ride a Bicycle . . . Save Gas, Oil, Rubber 



1267 FIRST AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Graystone 1878 



"Ernie" Brennan, Mgr. 



GENERAL MUSIC COMPANY 

Distributor Buckley Wall Box Music System - Used Phonographs 

1157 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 2 772 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

Engineers and Machinists - Brewer's Machinery - Diesel Engines 

934 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 4486 

J. J. REID COMPANY 

Fumigation for the Past Fifty Years 



417 SO. VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. 3 



WESTERN CASKET COMPANY 



BASIL L. SMOUT. Owner 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



HANSEN COFFEE 

"Just One Good Cup After Another" 

. . . ASK YOUR CROCER . . . 



1718 EAST I2TH STREET 



Phone BErkeley 7721 Edward Miller 

MILLER WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Manufacturers of Storage Battery Separators 
1335 SIXTH STREET BERKELEY. CALIF. 

California Builders Supply Co., Ltd. 

Everything in the Building Line 

700 6TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



NO. CALIF. RADIO OFFICERS ASSN. 
(Continued from Page IS) 

Discussion on recess of twenty minutes for exchange of 
technical information. Motion by Lucido, second by Mc- 
Murphy that the last twenty minutes of the meeting be 
used for general discussion. Motion carried. 

Discussion on honoring the member for the most out- 
standing work of the year. Motion by Hartnett, second 
by Lucido that a limit of $5.00 be spent for a gift to the 
member whose work was most outstanding for the year. 
Motion carried. 

McMurphy asked for the next meeting to be held at 
Oakland. Invitation accepted. 

There being no further business the meeting adjourned 
at 2:37 P. M. 

The following members were present: George K. Bur- 
ton, Herman J. Schwandt, J. H. Carleton, Frank E. Win- 
ters, E. W. Lindfeldt, Charles Cross, Donald Woods, J. 
M. Lewis, J. D. Hossack, E. H. McKee, Ivan Hudson, 
C. C. Collins, John J. Hartnett, Chas. B. McMurphy, 
Chas. Simpson, Merrill LeBoeuf, Frank Matjasich, Mott 
A. Brunton, Henry L. Bogardus, Henri Kirby, W. H. 
Harrington, Walter Wisnom and Dominic Lucido. 

Guests present were: Lieutenant Roy S. Skaggs, San 
Francisco, A. A. C. S.; Lieutenant George W. Hippely, 
San Francisco Police Department; John Hinkel, Sacra- 
mento California Highway Patrol, San Francisco-Oakland 
Bay Bridge and Lieutenant Foster J. Johnson, San Fran- 
cisco. 

ROSEBROOK RESIDENTIAL HOTEL 

"right in the center of things" 
1556 Broadway -k *Ar Oakland, California 

SUNSET TEA & COFFEE CO. 

Roasters, Blenders and Jobbers of High Grade Coffees 
1018 CLAY STREET OAKLAND 

SWeetwood 2800 

STANDARD TRAILER COMPANY 

415 San Leandro Boulevard 
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

FAIRBANKS, MORSE & COMPANY 

630 Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS 

PHIL RILEY 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 
PHONE 184-185 

ZUPPAN'S MARKET 

MATT A. ZUPPAN, Prop. 
GROCERIES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
COAL WOOD 



Telephone Hlgate 3703 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY CO. 

Incorporated 

W. B. Straub, President and Manager 

425-429 THIRD STREET OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Res. Phone: SWeetwood 6915 



Bus. Phone: KEllog 3-3525 



DAVE HAAS 

LICENSED SURVEYOR 



1268 - 47th AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Office Phone: Piedmont 3626 



EAST BAY MEMORIAL CO. 



Designers and Builders of 
MONUMENTS 



4435 PIEDMONT AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Telephone: TErnplebar 7843 



Antonio Ferro 



BAY CITY BOTTLE SUPPLY COMPANY 

New and Used Bottles of All Kinds 
Corks, Kegs and Sterilized Wiping Rags 

230 CASTRO STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone: TRinidad 1228 "We Buy and Sell" 

HARRY HALS BARGAIN STORE 

"WE SELL AT ROCK BOTTOM PRICES" 

Furniture - Linoleum - Mattresses 

Gas Stoves - Household Goods - Etc. 

7804 EAST I4TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TRUE BLUE CAFETERIA 

1714 FRANKLIN STREET 

TRUE FOOD CAFETERIA 

308 - 14TH STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone TErnplebar 4615 

UNITED AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

AUTO SUPPLIES AND ACCESSORIES 
24TH AND BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone: Hlgate 6320 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company 

OF NEW YORK 

A. C. Nelson, C. L. U., Manager 
Bank of America Building 
I2TH STREET AND BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone SWeetwood 2 82 8 

TRY KLUG'S FIRST 

WE BUILD AND FINANCE 

Insurance of All Kinds - Notary - Rentals - Loans 
Collections and Investments - List Your Property 



8615 EAST I4TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TErnplebar 82 13 



Milton Porte, Resident Manager 



634 



CLARIDGE HOTEL 

AMERICAN OR EUROPEAN PLAN 
Very Reasonable Rates 

I5TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Telephone OLympic 7530 

USED CARS WANTED 
We Pay Top Prices for Used Cars of All Makes 

MURPHY MOTOR CO. 

Studebaker Distributors for Alameda County 
3 73 7 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephone HUmboldt 2 700 - 2701 Walt Atkinson 

Atkinson Grinding and Machine Works, Inc. 

SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS - PRECISION GRINDING 
MANUFACTURING - HEAT TREATING 

1137 - 32ND STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephone KEllog 3-1432 

IDEAL CABINET SHOP 

1010 38TH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Telephone GLencourt 0298 

WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

STEAM CLEANING 



32 1 TENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



SCHOOL PATROL ANNUAL REVIEW 

(Continued from Page 14) 

President, Archdiocesan Council of Mothers' Clubs. 

School standards were decorated with ribbon awards, 
presented by the Automobile Association for efficient 
Patrol service, as follows: 

First Battalion: St. Agnes and Sacred Heart, tied; 
Most Holy Redeemer, St. Joseph, St. Anthony, School 
of the Epiphany and St. Joan of Arc. 

Second Battalion : Aptos Jr. High and Presidio Jr. High, 
tied; Marina Jr. High, James Lick Jr. High, Roosevelt Jr. 
High, Horace Mann Jr. High and Francisco Jr. High. 

Third Battalion: Lowell High, Galileo High, Poly- 
technic High, Sacred Heart High and George Wash- 
ington High. 

Fourth Battalion: Lawton, Grant, Paul Revere, La- 
guna Honda, Frederick Burke and Daniel Webster. 

Fifth Battalion: Redding and Dudley Stone, tied; Fran- 
cis Scott Key, Jefferson, Pacific Heights, Columbus and 
Grattan. 

Sixth Battalion: St. Brigid and St. Dominic, tied; St. 
Paul, St. Phillip, St. James, St. Vincent de Paul and St. 
Charles. 

Honorable mention to Star of the Sea School for out- 
standing School Safety Patrol work, though not organ- 
ized until second term of school year. 

Seventh Battalion: Fremont and John Muir, tied; Em- 
erson and Winfield Scott, tied; Marshall, Raphael Weill, 
Sunnyside and Golden Gate. 

Eighth Battalion: Almo and Sutro, tied; Monroe, Edi- 
son, Alvarado, Franklin and Kate Kennedy. 

7{inth Battalion: Madison and Frank McCoppin, tied; 
George Peabody, Longfellow, Garfield, Sheridan and 
Bret Harte. 

Tenth Battalion: Argonne and Commodore Sloat, 
tied; Lafayette, Andrew Jackson, Sherman, Farragut and 
San Miguel. 

Eleventh Battalion: West Portal, Bryant, Sanchez, 
William McKinley, Hancock-Cooper and Commodore 
Stockton. 

Compliments of 

Westinghouse Pacific Coast Brake Co. 

Bendix - Westinghouse Automotive Air Brake Co. 
II 01 MATSON BLDG. SAN FRANCISCO 

KEllogg 2-27 11 

JOSEPH PIEROTTI & CO. 



4129-37 E. 14th Street 



Oakland, California 



HI gate 8001 Architects' and Engineers' Supplies 

EAST BAY BLUE PRINT and SUPPLY CO. 

Authorized Distributor for KEUFFEL «c ESSER CO. of New York 

BLUE PRINTING - PHOTOSTATING 
1723 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND 

Office Phone OLympic 2620 

DIAMOND DAIRY 

PRODUCTS OF QUALITY 
4 706 Grove Street Oakland, California 



Phone KEllog 26966 Res. Ph.: GL. 8423 



Fred B. Roberts 



CABINETS by JOSEPHS 



501 29TH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



California Motor Express, Ltd. 
California Motor Transport Co., Ltd. 



1081 22ND STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 5248 



Bill Lewellyn, Jr., Manager 



KUNST BROS. PAINT STORES 

Paint - Wall Paper 

Oakland - San Francisco - Sacramento 

544 I2TH. Cor. CLAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



BOYERTOWN 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phones: Office. KEllog 2-677 1; Res., KEllog 2-3750 

HENRY A. PLEITNER 

Real Estate Loans & Insurance - Notary Public 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



402 1 EAST t4TH STREET 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC OXYGEN COMPANY 

2205 MAGNOLIA STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 98 70 



Fred Schlenker 



MOTOR PARTS COMPANY 

Automotive Parts 



2424 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone: Office. TEmplebar 2990 



Res. phone: TWinoaks 3975 



Bruehl's Metal Manufacturing Co. 

Tools - Dies - Stampings 



615 CASTRO STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 2-8515 Official Brake Station I 4 1 C. V. Davier 

ALAMEDA WHEEL 8c BRAKE SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Brake Service - Expert Steering and Front End 
Correction - Dynamic and Static Wheel Balancing 



1359 PARK AVENUE, near Central 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



PARISIAN BAKING CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



753 BROADWAY 



Phone KEarny 1513 



FIXTURES 



Sectional Partitions 



THE FINK 8t SCHINDLER CO. 

Manufacturing Contractors - Complete Installations 
Store - Bank - Bar - Restaurant - Office 

552 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



ABE SUTNICK 



Compliments of 

GRISON'S CHICKEN HOUSE 



2050 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon LA. 5-9974 



Jos. J. Querola 

M 8C L 



Wm. M. Phillabaum 



Cafe and Cocktail Lounge - Best of Liquors - Dancing 
979 SAN PABLO AVENUE ALBANY, CALIF. 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



Try Your Hand At This List 

True and False Questions Taken From Captains and Lieutenants Examination of 1942 



51. Firearms identification depends on the fact that the 
machining processes involved in gun manufacture 
leave constantly changing patterns in the barrels and 
on the breech of the parts. 

52. The association method is a method of determining 
if two persons were connected with the same crime. 

53. The best means of identifying a watch is by its 
make. 

54. It is possible to determine the speed of a motor ve- 
hicle by its skid marks. 

55. If a cast is to be made of a footprint in dust it is 
best immediately to pour plaster of paris on the im- 
print to preserve it. 

56. Pistol and revolver barrels are not "rifled." 

57. In examining questioned documents, the age of ink 
can usually be ascertained. 

58. Two bullets may be studied simultaneously by 
means of a comparison microscope. 

59. From the viewpoint of identification the revolver 
should be classified first by percussion and second by 
caliber. 

60. In the examination of a questioned document a 
cryptograph analysis is essential. 

61. It is easy to determine if the blood stain is human 
blood by the benzidine test. 

62. Determining the make of an unknown firearm is 
accomplished by examining the grooves of the bullet, 
their number and width as well as the direction and 
the lead of the spiral. 

63. If it is to be successful, a technique used in detect- 
ing deception must not rely upon the cooperation of 
the suspect. 

64. Hair found at the scene of a crime should be care- 
fully cut into several pieces so that if one piece is 
lost there will always be a sample for later iden- 
tification. 

65. Venous blood cannot be distinguished from arterial 
blood. 

66. Due to the differences of American cars, the distance 
between the two rear or front tire marks give very 
important information. 

67. The first rule of Dactyloscopy is that there are no 
two identical fingerprints. 

68. The classification and treatment of offenders should 
be conducted from the point of view of the welfare 
of society. 

69. The law requires that copies of each set of finger- 
prints taken of prisoners should be forwarded to the 
FBI and the State Bureau. 

70. Criminality usually arises from environmental fac- 
tors that can be controlled. 

71. The fingerprints of infants or juveniles do not ma- 
terially change at reaching adult age. 

72. It is possible in certain cases to determine the ap- 
proximate height of an individual from a series of 



footprints. 

73. The crime laboratory not only increases the effective- 
ness of criminal investigations but in many cases re- 
duces the cost of such investigation. 

74. Education is the best method of reducing vice con- 
ditions. 

75. Probation is a constructive method of rehabilitating 
criminals. 

76. The following are fundamental purposes of a muni- 
cipal police organization: preservation of peace, pre- 
vention of crime, detection of crime, protection of 
life and property, and apprehension and prosecution 
of violators of the law. 

77. Lombroso is known for developing a system of iden- 
tification by means of measurements. 

78. Enforcement, Engineering and Elevated Highways 
are recognized as the three "Es" essential in traffic 
control. 

CLINE PIANO COMPANY 

Largest Exclusive Piano Dealers in the West 
345 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

2097 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



INSURED VANS— ESTIMATES QUOTED 



OLympic 2231 



DICK'S VAN 8C STORAGE 

DICK'S EXPRESS 

GUARANTEED RELIABLE SERVICE 

Moving - Packing - Storage 

652S TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 

ANDREW WILLIAMS STORES 



BRODWAY & McARTHUR 



OAKLAND 



GArfield 0835 

DR. 

90S Market Street 



WM. W. HOAGLAND 

DENTIST 

San Francisco 



EXbrook 6500 

COMPLIMENTS 

GOLDEN WEST PLATING WORKS, LTD. 

127-133 MISSION STREET 
Telephone HEmlock 6774 

WILLIAM J. FORSTER SONS, LTD. 

PLUMBING 
340 HARRIET STREET 



William M. Forster 



San Francisco 



SKyline 0416 



Gabriel Laclergue 



BOUDIN BAKERY 

GENUINE FRENCH BREAD 

Established since 1849 
399 Tenth Avenue 



San Francisco 



FARM and GARDEN EQUIPMENT 

Garden Tractors — Sprayers — Hose — Sprinklers 

Guanite and Vigoro Fertilizers 

V. CARTER CO. INC. 



H. 



52 BEALE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



VAlencia 5121-22-23 

KEN ROYCE CONSTRUCTION 
EQUIPMENT RENTAL CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE AND YARD 
185 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



79. A uniform administration of traffic laws is essential 
to success in solving traffic problems and reducing 
traffic hazards. 

80. The main complication of the traffic problem in San 
Francisco is due to its topography. 

81. An important part of an accident prevention pro- 
gram is the monthly computation of the traffic en- 
forcement index of the community. 

82. A law enforcement agency is adequately handling 
the traffic if it is securing about twice the number of 
convictions for moving violations as there are per- 
sonal injury accidents. 

83. The tendency in traffic accident prevention programs 
today is to concentrate upon types of violations 
which are known to cause accidents. 

84. The traffic enforcement index enables the police to 
determine the adequacy of their enforcement work. 

85. Under the system of uniform crime reporting in use 
in this country, if one person murders two persons 
two offenses are listed ; and if three persons murder 
one person one offense is listed. 

86. The effectiveness of traffic signs, signals and street 
marking is dependent upon driver obedience, hence 
lax law enforcement will result in a decrease in ac- 
cidents. 

87. The Bulletin, Uniform Crime Reports is issued by 
the International Association of Chiefs of Police. 

88. Records of arrests are generally accepted to be ac- 
curate measures of the extent of crime. 

89. Most of the crimes reported to the police and in- 
cluded in Part 1, of the Uniform Crime Reports, are 
crimes against property. 



ATwater 2000-2001 



SNOW WHITE BAKING CO. 

"QUALITY BAKERS" 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2940 FOLSOM STREET 



DOuglas 2998-2999 

M. REBIZZO & CO. 

MACHINE SHOP 
Wine Machinery and Equipment 
414 BROADWAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CLOTHING FOR MEN AND BOYS 

SIEGEL'S 



2366 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone KEllog 4-3083 



Distributor of St. Tome Brand Coffee 



AFFONSO'S FOOD STORE 

Groceries, Olive Oil, Beer, Wine 

173 3 FOOTHILL BLVD. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone SUtter 7565 

GEO. E. HONN CO. 

Manufacturers Representatives 

420 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 5692 

CINNABAR CLUB 

Fred Ted Young - James B. Cannon 
ELLIS and JONES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GOLDEN GATE THEATRE 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phon= Mission 0236 Stoves & Stove Repairs Louis A. Gernhardt 

GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Ironers, Water Heaters, 
Room Heaters, Linoleum 

MISSION STREET, Corner 18th Street SAN FrtANClSCO 



^y 75 Years Ago t^ 

This bank began its career as a savings institution in 1868. 
Seventy-five years of Home Financing has established this bank 
as an expert in advising the buyers and builders of homes. 

'Bring your Home Loans to any one of our Seven Offices. 



& 



THIRD WAR LOAN 

Back the Attack with War Bonds 



ft 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 1868 TRUST 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
SEVEN OFFICES . . . EACH A COMPLETE BANK 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



90 



9] 



A record of embezzlements reported to the poplice 
is generally accepted to be an accurate measure of 
the number of crimes of embezzlement committed. 
The Uniform Crime Reports reveal that the age 
group 19-22 shows a higher number of arrests than 
the age group 22-25. 

92. According to statistics in Uniform Crime Reports, 
the Negro shows the highest homicide rate among 
the various races in this country. 

93. A record of auto thefts reported to the police closely 
approximates the number of autos stolen. 

94. At least 50 per cent of all crimes committed are 
charged to persons less than 25 years of age. 

95. There is usually more crime per unit of population 
in the average city with over 100,000 population 
than in the average smaller community. 
The majority of auto theft offenses are charged to 
youths under 21 years of age. 

The number of attempted crimes reported to the 
police is not reflected in the Uniform Crime Reports. 
Statistics on recidivism among burglars support the 
statement that this type of crime is rarely repeated 
by the same person. 

(To be Continued) 



96 



97 



98 



19 MEN WIN PROMOTIONS IN 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

One sergeant was promoted to the rank of lieutenant 
and 18 patrolmen were elevated to the rank of sergeant, 
by the San Francisco Police Department Commissioners, 
Walter McGovern, William P. Wobber and Ward G. 
Walkup, on recommendation of Chief of Police Charles 
W. Dullea. 

The appointments took effect September 16, and the 
men affected with their new assignments were as follows: 

Lieutenant Edward D. Hippely, City Prison, transferred 
to Co. G. 

Sergeants Edward C. Greene, Co. E to Co. H; Charles 
E. Borland, Co. E to Co. G; William A. Hanrahan, Co. A 
to Co. H; Frederick C. Schuler, Co. K to Co. G, (APB) ; 
Arthur P. Williams, Co. K to Co. F, (APB); Leo M. 
Hayes, Co. K to Co. B; Edgar C. Shea, Bureau of Inspec- 
tors, to remain on said assignment; Robert Winter, Co. G 
to Co. I; Arnold J. Krieg, H. Q. Co. to Co. I, Bureau of 
Communications; Wesley H. Kelly, Co. B to Co. E; 
Ignacio Zaragoza, Co. K to Co. J; Daniel J. Lynch, H. Q. 
Co. (City Prison), remain on said assignment; Daniel R. 
Mullen, H. Q. Co. to Co. C, (Big Brother Detail); 
Charles W. Lyons, Co. A to Co. J; Charles A. Barca, 
H. Q. Co. to Co. G (Bureau of Communications) ; Rob' 
ert B. West, Co. D to Co. F; Lloyd J. Kennedy, Co. A 
to Co. E; Frank J. Matjasich, H. Q. Co. (Bureau of 
Communications) , remain on said assignment. 

The following transfer was also made : Sergeant Martin 
C. Spellman, Co. G to Co. B. 



SUtter 7060 

S. BRIZZOLARA DRAYING CO. 



DRAYAGE — FORWARDING 



106 CLAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



STAR OLIVE OIL 



The "Star" of Olive Oil* 



A. GIURLANI & BRO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



S. L. ABBOT COMPANY 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS, OILS, NAVAL STORES 

LAUNDRY and CLEANERS SUPPLIES 

WEED KILLERS, AMMUNITION 

135 KING STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



LA ROCCA BROTHERS CO. 

957 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

AARON GOLDBERG THEATRES 

PERLESS THEATRE — Third Street near Mission 

NEWSREEL THEATRE — Next to the Warfield 

SILVER PALACE THEATRE — Market Street opposite Grant Avenue 

EGYPTION THEATRE — Market Street opposite Jones Street 

REGAL THEATRE — Market Street near Paramount Theatre 

NEW NEWSREEL THEATRE — 1118 Broadway, Oakland 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

COMMODORE HOTEL 

825 SUTTER STREET 
AND 

LOMBARD HOTEL 

1015 GEARY STREET 
Phone EXbrook 9642 Nelson Bros., Prop* 

HOTEL ANGLO 

200 Modern Rooms — Steam Heat 
241 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

Phone HEmlock 2714-2715 Fresh Ranch Eggs 

STANDARD EGG COMPANY 

WHOLESALE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

2190 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

PIN MONEY TERMS 

BROOKS 

CAMERAS — RADIOS 



1048 MARKET 



HEmlock 3035 



Mission 9561 



APEX BUFFET 



The Bright Spot of the Mission 
1498 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



DOuglas 0817 



BURYL BLEVENS 



Mgr. Occidental Life Ins. Co. 
300 Montgomery Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone MArket 9085 

TEMPLE GRILL 

THE RIGHT PLACE TO EAT QUALITY FOOD 

QUICK SERVICE PRIVATE BOOTHS FOR LADIES 

2974-16th Street Near Mission Street 



HOTEL CLARK 



EDDY AT TAYLOR STREET 



San Francisco 



SUtter 5954-5 



H. W. GOULD 8t CO. 



Mining & Metallurgical Engineers 

GOULD ROTARY FURNACES QUICKSILVER 

MILLS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



AUXILIARY S. F. POLICE WIN 
COMMENDATONS 

Auxiliary Sergeant E. L. Smith of Co. H, while detailed 
at Aquatic Park on August 28th, 1943, rendered efficient 
police service in connection with the administering of first 
aid to Charles Castillo, age 10 years, who was injured and 
severely burned by a fragment of a flare during an exhibi- 
tion of a commando attack. Auxiliary Sergeant E. L. 
Smith is hereby commended for this efficient police work 
and three (3) credits shall be awarded to him. 

On Saturday, August 14, 1943, Corporal Joseph An- 
selmo of the Auxiliary Police, Company E, rendered effi- 
cient police service in connection with an accident which 
occurred at Mason and Market streets and which involved 
a hit and run police case. Corporal Joseph Anselmo, is 
hereby commended and three (3) credits shall be awarded 
to him. 

On Monday, August 30, 1943, Auxiliary Police Officer 
Harold Semeria of Company A, rendered valuable serv- 
ice in connection with an accident which occurred at 
Union Street and Grant Avenue, and which involved a 
runaway automobile. Auxiliary Officer Harold Semeria is 
hereby commended for bus efficient service and two (2) 
credits shall be awarded to him. 

LEAMINGTON HOTEL 

PHIL C. RILEY, Manager 
I9TH and FRANKLIN STREETS OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Bill Lopes, Manager 

VALLEJO BOWL 



CORNER YORK AND SONOMA STS. 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



GOLDEN WEST MEAT CO. 

6542 BAY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HIghgate 4622 

LORIMER DIESEL ENGINE CO. 

Marine and Stationary 

SIXTEENTH and WOOD STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Merco Nordstrom Division of 

Pittsburgh Equitable Meter Company 



PHONE CROCKETT 393 

MIRA-MARE RESTAURANT 

Italian Dinners, Home Made Raviolis, Private Banquets 

WINES and BEER 

STARR STREEl & SECOND AVENUE 

D. & T. DONZELLI CROCKETT, CALIF. 



YATES BROTHERS 

QUALITY GROCERS— COAL 



CROCKETT, CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 259 



PINOLE 11 



CORRIGAN and DALMASSO 



ANTLERS 

PINOLE, CALIFORNIA 



CROCKETT ELECTRIC LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

W. C. SHIELD, Proprietor 

Member of National Laundry Owners Association 

695 Pomona Avenue, Crockett, California 



PHONE CROCKETT 41 



MARTINEZ 161 



BURLINGTON HOTEL & TAVERN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE — MIXED DRINKS 

A. Boehm & Sons. Props. 

WE NEVER CLOSE 

Phone Crockett 19 Port Costa, Calif. 



Telephone 2925 

MAC A DEE 

FOOD STORES 

1039 Tennessee Street — 2270 Sacramento Street 

VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



CALDWELL'S 

LIQUORS — WINES— BEERS — DELICATESSEN 
1228 Sonoma Street — Phone 3-6010 — Vallejo, California 



CROCKETT 629 



HOTEL 



DAN'S PLACE 

MIXED DRINKS AND BEER 

PORT COSTA, CALIFORNIA 



243 1 PERALTA STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



RICHMOND 5909-R 

LITTLE BOHEMIA 

TRAILER SPACE— COTTAGES, AT REASONABLE RATES 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

BROWNIE'S PLACE 

WINES — LIQUOR — BEER 

Across the Street from Columbia Theatre 

Romeo Banda, Prop. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

CROCKETT 264 

D. MURPHY TAVERN 

885 LOVING AVENUE CROCKETT, CALIF. 

PARK VIEW HOTEL 

CROCKETT, CALIFORNIA 

Rents at Reasonable Prices Opposite C. & H. Main Office 

PHONE CROCKETT 600 

Trv LIGHTNER'S MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEAT AND PRODUCE 

We carry a large line of lunch meat and fruit for lunches 

BE A SATISFIED CUSTOMER I 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

PHONE 4796 

COMPLIMENTS 

ROXSIE'S PLACE 

BEER— WINE— POOL TABLES 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



COMPLIMENTS 

Domenic G. Pensabene 

JEWELER 

519 Columbus Ave. — San Francisco 

Van Wormer 8C Rodrigues, Inc. 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

126 POST STREET— EXbrook S886-87 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GArfield 1952 — L. Dal Poggetto, Prop. 

PANAMA CANAL 

RAVIOLI FACTORY 

Ravioli and Tagliarini Fresh Every Day 

1358 Grant Ave. San Francisco 



Mission 8484 



Licensed Broker 



CHARLES L. WEYRO 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Real Estate — Insurance — Loans 

3169 Twenty-first St. San Francisco 

WEst 9788 Open 3 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily 

SAM'S BAIT SHOP 

FRESH SARDINES DAILY 

Bass and Salmon Parties Arranged 

1657 O'Farrell St. San Francisco 

Phone Fillmore 3352 O. Van Haren, prop. 

STANDARD DRUG STORE 

Licensed Prescription Pharmacy 

Cor. Divisadero & Geary Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MArket 6873 



We Give Miss : on Stamps 



BEE-HIVE MILLINERY 

Hats Remodeled and Made to Order 

2294 Mission Street, Cor. 19th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CASABLANCA 

UNIQUE ATMOSPHERE 
EVergreen 9810 3321 GEARY BLVD. 

Telephone BAyview 3134 

LINDA BEAUTY SHOP 

All Kinds Machineless Waves — All Branches 

of Beauty Culture 

519 Clement St.. Near 6th Ave. 

PHONE PROSPECT 9650 

Olympic Coffee Shop 

605 POST STREET 

Christ P. Poulos San Francisco 

Phone DOuglas 9653 

THE LODGE CLUB 

CHOICE WINES and REFRESHMENTS 

DRAUGHT and BOTTLED BEER 

372 Third Street San Francisco 

New York Cloak 8C Suit Co. 

130 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Bay View Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

6157 Geary Boulevard San Francisco 

Phone: SKyline 2621 

A. MIRANDE, Prop. 

Liberty French Laundry 

2159 Geary Street 
PHONE WALNUT 4817 

UNderhill 1826 

WALTER GORDON 

REAL ESTATE-INSURANCE 

414 Castro Street 

Next to Bank of America 

Phone DOuglas 2794 

BIANCHI'S MACHINE SHOP 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

221 Bay Street San Francisco 



Modern Methods Prompt Service 

Perfection Curtain Cleaners 

Curtain, Drapes and Blanket Specialists 

3121 Seventeenth Street 

HEmlock 3434 San Francisco 

COMPLIMENTS 

BERT SCHAFFER 

9 Ellis Street — San Francisco 
Telephone WAlnut 5030 

Roosevelt Meat Market 

CHOICE MEATS AND POULTRY 

Call Before 10 a. m. for Delivery Service 

1208 Fillmore Street, Corner Turk 

Rock-Ola COMMANDO Phonograph 
The Last Word in Automatic Music 

M. A. POLLARD dc CO. 

725 Larkin Street Phone ORdway 5171 

Lee 8i Geanne Weber 

ST. MARY'S PUB 
3845 Mission Street Mission 9329 

COMPLIMENTS 

GARIBALD'S CAFE 



1276 Market Street 



San Francisco 



PROMPT DELIVERY 

DROHER COAL CO. 

13331 Folsom Street, Betwesn 9th & 10th 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone DOuglas 6484 

DE BERRY BROTHERS 

Radio, Apparatus and Installations 
228 Drumm Street San Francisco 

KARL SCHAAF 

Manufacturer of High Quality Cookies and 

Holiday Specialties 

35 Clement Street — SKyl'ne 7773 

COMPLIMENTS 

IDORA REALTY CO. 

WE BUY HOUSES FOR CASH 

5505 Telegraph Aveiue — OL. 2801 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TELEPHONE PIEDMONT 0258 

Paramount Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

4216 Telegraph Avenue — OAKLAND 

HIgate 4100 

East Bay Sheet Metal Works 

Industrial Sheet Metal 
HEATING AND VENTILATING 
1101 Market Street — OAKLAND 

COMPLIMENTS 

DEPOT PLACE 

1358 Fruitvale Avenue — OAKLAND 
Mixed Drinks a Specialty — Cocktail Lcunge 

NEW RODEO HOTEL 

JIM GUTHRIE. Prop. 

Phone Rodeo 4784 On Main Highway 

RODEO, CALIFORNIA 



Lucky Spot Pool Hall 

1701 Buchanan Street— SAN FRANCISCO 

EARL GREEN 

400 Georgia Street — VALLEJO, CALIF. 



ORTON MACHINE CO. 

Manufacturers of Woodworking 

Machinery 

390 Fremont Street San Francisco 

Lo Bianco Brothers Mfg. Co. 

Sheet Metal Specialists 

1108 Howard Street San Francisco 

PHONE MARKET 9916 

PHONE DOUGLAS 3200 

Brannan Street Planing Mill 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in General 

Mill work 
560 Brannan Street San Francisco 

Pacific Screw Products Co. 

566 Van Ness Avenue, South 
SAN FRANCISCO 

TOWING SERVICE HE. 9693 

CIVIC CENTER GARAGE 

C. A. WIGHOLM 

State- Wide Automobile Carriers 

129 Oak Street San Francisco 

Phone Market 2375 322-28 Sixth Street 

San Francisco Engineering Co. 

ENGINEERS, MACHINISTS 

We are Prepared to Handle all Classes of 
Machine Work. Gear Cutting, Etc. 

Phone YU. 1238 Established 1913 

O'BRIEN IRON WORKS 

Engineers-Machinists - Electric Welding 

ANYTHING IN METAL 

222 Perry Streett San Francisco, 7 

COMPLIMENTS 

RUST OPTICAL CO. 

109 Ellis Street — San Francisco 



COMPLIMENTS 

Snap-On Tools Corporation 

276 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Pacific Surgical Gown Co. 

Manufacturers of Surgical Gowns, Etc. 
1626 Eddy Street Phone WAlnut 1158 

COMPLIMENTS 

O. L. KING 8C CO. 

436 Clementina Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 



COMPLIMENTS 

Alhambra 5c 8C 10c Store 

2246 Polk Street — San Francisco 
24-HOUR SERVICE 

HAMBURGER KING 

DELICIOUS STEAKS AND CHOPS 
2229 Chestnut Street WEst 9912 

COMPLIMENTS 

COLE STREET HARDWARE 

KEYS MADE 
944 Cole Street — SAN FRANCISCO 

ALBERT PICARD 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Financial Center Building 

405 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 4070 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Skyline 1442-1443 Residence DE. 36S7 

A. FOREST 

EXPERT LOCKSM1TH1NG 
SHOP — 316 8th Avenue 

Phone MArket 83 38 We call and deliver 

Capitol Cleaning and Dyeing Plant 

Your Garments, etc.. Done by Experts Only 
20 Brady Street San Francisco 

Phone DOuglas 9720 

HOTEL KING 

A Home away from Home 
44 Third Street San Francisco 

Phone VAlencia 1542 Tanner-Hirzel 

MISSION TIME SERVICE 

Certified Watch Repairing 
3 168 22nd St.. bet. Mission and Capp S. F. 

Phones: HEmlock 3514-15 Res.: OV. 5475 

B. LEVY 8C SONS 

Restaurant and Store Fixtures 
616 McAllister Street San Francisco 

Phone UNderhill 9930 

AUTOMATIC CANTEEN CO. 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

3 08 llth Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

GRANUCCI HARDWARE CO. 

1 42 California Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

CONSULATE OF PORTUGAL 



320 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Phones: Hlgate 4633 - 4634 T. C. Hobart 

HOBART EXPRESS CO. 

Specializing in Down-town Moving 
874 30th Street Oakland, Calif. 



John C. Merritt Leon H. Merritt 

MERRITT BLACKSMITH SHOP 

General Blacksmi thing 
1244 High St.. near E. 14th St. Oakland 

Dine and Dance . . . Geo. and Hazel Morris 

CLUB ALABAM 

Catering to Banquets 



14891 East 14th Street 



Oakland, Calif. 



Compliments of 

OAKLAND PANTS FACTORY 

1922 San Pablo Oakland, Calf 

Phone Piedmont 0352 Joe Caponio, Prop. 

MIDWAY MARKET 

Wines, Beers, Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables 
942 54th Street Oakland, Calif. 

Everything to wear for the he man 

RAPHAEL'S 

A Sputh of Market Boy 
523 Marin Street Vallejo, Calif. 

Phone DEIaware 6900 Grant Pond, Prop. 

APTOS MARKET 

Groceries, Fruits, Veg: tables, Free Delivery 
2339 Ocean Avenue San Francisco 

Complimets of 

OTTO FRE I 

Watchmakers and Jewelers Supplies 
Phone DOu»l»s 7872 

L. C. HARLAN, D.D.S. 

Room 556, Flood Building San Francisco 

Coast Line Truck Service, Inc. 

104 Clay Street San Francisco 

Phone RAndoloh 3435 

NEW ALPHA LAUNDRY 

and Zoric Dry Cleaning 
593 Naples Street San Francisco 



Phone Piedmont 1239 

CITY CORNICE CO., INC. 

Sheet Metal Work, Patent Chimneys. Roofing 
312 1 San Pablo Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Twinoaks 2240 

O. MAZURETTE 

New and Rebuilt Woodworking Machinery 
576 to 584 Fifth Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phonj UNderhill 5773 

PEOPLES BAKING COMPANY 

Gen. Office: 1800 Bryant St. San Francisco 
Oakland Plant: Park Ave. 6t Harlan Street 

Phone LAkehurst 2-4343 

OTZEN BROS. Bottling Co. 

Bottlers of LeVida Distinctive Beverages 
23 14 Santa Clara Avenue Alameda, Calif. 

Phone Hlgate 6066 

Standard Mill and Lumber Co. 

Mill Work of All Descriptions 
475 First Street Oakland, Calif. 



Phone GLencourt 9380 



Edward M. Gross 



GROSS BROS. 

"Superior Furniture" 
537 12th Street Oakland, Calif. 



La 


Due Technical 


Institute 




Advertising Bui 


lding 


324 Thirteenth Street 


Oakland, Calif. 




Compliments 


of 


Oakl 


and Forge and Tool Works 


1836 E. 


1 2th Street 


Oakland, Calif. 



Phone UNderhill 3838 

LEROY OLSON CO. 

Floors for Any Purse or Purpose 
3070 17th Street San Francisco 



NEW POLICE OFFICERS ASSIGNED 

Effective at 8:00 A. M., Friday, September 3rd, 1943, 
the following limited tenure patrolmen are hereby trans- 
ferred from Headquarters Company (Police Academy) 
and assigned to companies shown: Frank Roefer, to Co. 
F; Alfred Girola, to Co. G; James R. Collins, to Co. H; 
Gibbs L. Baker, to Co. I. 

Effective Thursday, September 2, 1943, at 8:00 A. M., 
the following transfers of tenure appointment officers of 
H. Q. Co. (Police Academy), are hereby made to com- 
panies shown and they shall be so notified : Jerome J. 
Cowhig, to Co. F; Edwin E. Horton, to Co. F; Albert E. 
Steiger, to Co. F; James D. Balestreri, to Co. G; Peter J. 
Bogdanoff, to Co. H; Robert Boro, to Co. G; Robert P. 
Cordero, to Co. H; Gustave C. Wyman, to Co. H; George 
E. Steil, to Co. J; Robert F. Kurpinsky, to Co. J; Weston 
C. Cross, to Co. I; Marcus Mosk, to Co. I. 



PENINSULA POLICE ASSOCIATION 
ANNUAL BALL 

The fifteenth annual ball of the Peninsula Police Offi- 
cers' Association of California is scheduled for the evening 
of September 25, a Saturday. 

This yearly event has become one of the outstanding 
entertainment features of the Peninsula, and has contribu- 
ted much to the success of the Association, for it is held 
for the purpose of providing money for the Widows' and 
Orphans' fund. 



This year's ball will be held at Pacific City Auditorium 
in San Mateo, and Chief Wm. Wisnom, of Hillsborough, 
is chairman in charge of the festivities. Chief Wisnom 
has provided for the best of music and nothing has been 
left undone that will contribute to a swell evening for the 
large attendance assured by the advance sale of the tickets. 



BUY WAR BONDS 



Phone 2256 No Job Too Large - No Job Too Small 

CHAS. BONDIETT 

Auto Painting - Body and Fender Work 
We are ke:p:ng in date with the new Lacquers & Synthetic Enamels 



532 CAROLINA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Diel 22102 

LYON SERVICE 

Laundry and Cleaners 
3 12 BENECIA ROAD 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-9896 



Oscar Hanson, Proprietor 



OSCAR'S 

Wines - Liquors - Beer - Delivery Service 



1469 MacARTHUR BLVD 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



VALLEJO HAS GROWN 

("Continued from Page 1 ) 
and Army intelligence officers and has coordinated his 
department with these agencies as well as with peace offi- 
cers of nearby counties, in the matter of civilian defense 
as well as in the apprehension of criminals. 

He has been able to maintain this splendid record with 
but 34 men, two radio and telephone operators, two clerks 
and a stenographer. 

When he took over the department in 1940 he had 22 
policemen on his roster. 

There has been no increase in the so-called major crimes 
in Vallejo, and the men under Chief Dierking have han- 
dled those of a lesser nature promptly and effectively, as 
well as those in the higher brackets. 

During the past year Chief Dierking and his men have 
apprehended 220 fugitives wanted in various states of the 
Union. The report of the Department for the fiscal year 
ending June 30 also shows eight counterfeiters arrested, 
170 investigations for Federal agencies, 46 robberies 
cleared up, 281 taken on for suspicious conduct. 

Total number of cases reported for all crimes totalled 
2877 for the year. Fines by the courts total $42, 8 19. 10 
for the year. 

The Traffic Bureau under this direction of Sergeant 
Jack E. Stiltz, made 9945 arrests, 131 of which were for 
drunken driving, 433 for speeding, 36 for reckless driving. 
Fines to the amount of $20,9^1 were collected during this 
period. 

Of the automobiles stolen for the year numbering 276, 
all but 15 were recovered. 

One of the major improvements made by Chief Dierk- 
ing during the past fiscal year was the establishment of a 
first-rate Bureau of Identification. Deputy Sheriff Harry 

TOTH'S PASTRY SHOP 

The Place of Finer Pastries 
710 MAIN STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone Vallejo 3-5782 

BARNEWITZ PAINT STORE 

Distributor Morwear Paints . . . Last Longer 

521 MARIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

JACK MEYERS' GREEN LANTERN 

300 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-7386 I I a.m. to 2 a.m. Order to Take Out Ming. Prop. 

MING'S CAFE 

American and Chinese Dishes - Fried Shrimps a Specialty 
411 SANTA CLARA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone Crockett 648 



Under New Management 



HILL TOP CAFE AND CLUB 

Fine Liquors - French and Italian Dinners 
400 Yds. From Carquinez Bridge, Main High. CROCKETT, CALIF. 
Phone 2-0974 "Gus" A. J. Bauman 

SERVAL FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

Wholesale Distributor 
7 MAIN STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



CARQUINEZ INN 

VALLEJO. CALIFORNIA 
GOOD FOOD — QUICK SERVICE 



HELEN 



ART 



W. B. WHITE E. G. CONN 

MIRA VISTA DRUG CO. 

Richmond 2592 

Corner Barrett & San Pablo Avenue 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

B. and W. AUTO PARTS 

AUTO WRECKERS VALLEJO, CALIF. 

BENICIA 414 

PIMENTEL GROCERS 



BEERS — GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS 

BENICIA, CALIFORNIA 



GOOD SERVICE 



BENICIA 60SW 

WINK'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

THE BEST OF SERVICE FOR GOOD FELLOWSHIP 

JOSEPH R. GANDO, Prop. Benicia, California 

"HUB" 

CIGARS — CIGARETTES — MAGAZINES 
BEER & WINE 



"BOB" GEER 



47 Georgia Street 



Vallejo, California 



HOLLYWOOD FOUNTAIN 

Sandwiches of all kinds, bacon and eggs, hot cakes served all day. 

440 Virginia Street Sam Alhadeff, owner 

VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 

PHONE RICHMOND 1542 

STEGE GROCERIES 

Beer — Wine — Vegetables and Fruits — All kinds of Meat 
990 South 47th Street. Richmond, California 

Compliments of 

GOLDEN WEST CAFE 



241 Georgia Street 



Vallejo, California 



BLONDE'S CAFE 



Blondee Meyer, Proprietor 
323 Santa Clara Street Vallejo, California 



PHONE 3-9654 



TOWNE CLUB 

Vance Harris, Manager 
421 Georgia Street — Vallejo, California 



VALLEJO DELICATESSEN 



409 VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 20738 

MRS. J. NOGUE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

3018 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone 3- 4414 



Martha E. McGuffin, Mgr. 



VALLEJO BEAUTY SCHOOL 

Bonded and Licensed by the State 



53 3 SACRAMENTO STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



L. Oliver was obtained from Sheriff Thornton and made 
superintendent of this bureau. 

The past year this section of the police department 
measured and fingerprinted 2036 prisoners. This entailed 
taking of 8144 fingerprints. There was sent to the FBI 
and the State Bureau of Identification 2800 fingerprint 
cards each. Identifications were made of local prisoners to 
the total of 619, and for outside 1077. 

In addition the Bureau of Identification received and 
acted upon correspondence requiring search of files; and 
reports of pawned articles, properly indexed and filed, to 
the number of 15,650. 

The radio communication end of the Vallejo Police 
Department has undergone some important changes dur- 
ing the past year. The department received permission to 
move the radio set from upstairs to the basement of the 
police station which has been renovated and put in first' 
class condition, and is shared in by the Bureau of Identi- 
fication. The calls are averaging over 200 per day, and 
are handled by two young ladies from 7 a. m. to 11 p. m., 
and by a licensed operator from the police department. 
George Burton of Martinez is in charge of the radio end 
of the department. 

A new aerial has been installed on top of the City Hall 
extending 105 feet above the roof and a new radio set 
increasing the power from 50 to 250 watts gives a full 
coverage of Solano County and improving station KGPG 
two-way radio service. The department has eight cars 
equipped with two-way radio and five motorcycles. 

Chief Dierking has organized a well-formed auxiliary 
police force and has trained the men, volunteering, in 
every phase of prospective duties in case of emergencies. 



ANGELA'S LIQUOR STORE 

413 BRANCIFORTE STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

TINY SMOKE SHOP 

Welcomes All Mare Island Workers and Service Men 
30 GEORGIA STREET, Half Block from Ferry VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone 3-7384 



W. H. Armstrong 



PACIFIC ROOFING CO. 

Authorized Pabco Applicators 



2102- 04 SONOMA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



j. j. Mcdonald 



222 VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



Phone TUxedo 5460 John B. Lischetti, Mgr. 

SIROCCO'S 

Famous Italian Foods 
136 Taylor Street SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Ph;ne MArket 2772 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

Engineers and Machinists 
934-944 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PHONE 3-4850 

R. LENZI 

GROCERY AND MEAT MARKET 
Fruits and Vegetables Beer and Liquors 

201 MAINE STREET VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 94 Residence Phone 242 

BENICIA GARAGE 

BENICIA-VALLEJO STAGE LINE 

FIRST AND F STREET 

AUTO REPAIRS AND ACCESSORIES 

Milo Passalacque, Prop. Benicia, California 

Phone Vallejo 1417 

AL'S SPORT SHOP 

FORMERLY MAGISTRINI'S 

Al Lutenegger, Prop 22 I Georgia Street Vallejo, California 

Telephone Vallejo 3-9737 

SOLANO INN 

WHERE GOOD FELLOWS GET TOGETHER 
233 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO 

PHONE 3-9873 

PALM GRILL 

115 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Eugene Garibaldi Antonio Barone 

VICTORY CORNER 

BEER • WINE • LIQUORS 

GOOD EATS 

101 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

PHONE 3-9234 

SOUTH VALLEJO MARKET 

FULL LINE OF MEATS AND GROCERIES 
J. McGowan, Claude Grant 421 Lemon Street 



U. Marenzi 



Luigi Guidi 



ASTOR HOTEL 



HOME OF ITALIAN DINNERS 

Bat in Connection Phone 2-0715 

144 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Residence Phone 3-3447 Business Phone 3-3683 

GEORGE LIMBERS 

SANITARY PRODUCE CO. 109 Virginia Street Vallejo, Calif. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE • BAR 

TRAVELER'S CAFE 

WE SERVE ONLY THE BEST BRANDS 

100 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 2937 — J. Caselli, Prop. 



Phone 3-5506 



Sam Louie, Prop. 



125 GEORGIA STREET 



KIN FONG CAFE 

CHOP SUEY and NOODLES 
12 A. M. to 3 A. M. 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



STEAKS AND CHOPS 

VALLEJO GRILL 

WE SERVE ONLY THE VERY BEST OF FOODS 
Phone 3-9911 204 Georgia Street Vallejo, California 

GOOD BEER— WINES, and LIQUORS Phone 366 

ANDREW'S LIQUOR STORE 

QUIC KSERVICE — FREE DELIVERY 
401 GEORGIA VALLEJO, CALIF. 

DIAL 3-5349 

BERRY AND SINCLAIR STUDIO 

THE FINEST IN PHOTOGRAPHS 
DON W. BERRY 71S SONOMA STREET VALLEJO 



Page 3: 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



He has 400 members on the active list. 

Chief Dierking takes great pride in the School Traffic 
Patrols which he helped organize in 1927. Since that 
time there has not been a single accident at any point 
these junior patrol officers were handling the traffic. To- 
day he has more than 250 youngsters engaged in traffic 
control in fourteen public and private schools. 

Believing that the secret of crime prevention lies with 
the youth of the land, Chief Dierking last November 
organized a Police Department Troop of Boy Scouts. 
This Troop, No. 50, now has more than 25 members, 
and the police officers of Vallejo give generously of their 
time in Scout matters, providing outings, parades and 
rifle practice. Troop 50 is the only one in the Council 
that is uniformed 100 per cent. 

At the last municipal election Vallejo elected a new 
mayor, George Demmon, and the Mayor with Police 
Commissioners Andrew Sheveland and Frank Brew are 
seeing to it that the police department receives every en- 
couragement to continue the splendid work that has 
marked its record for the past three years. 

Vallejo is a well-policed city and though the war activi- 
ties have brought a lot of undesirables to the community 
it is a well-established fact that the police department has 
cramped the style of these itinerant would-be burglars, 
robbers, assaulters and ordinary hoodlums. 



FISH HAIR STYLES 



524 SACRAMENTO STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



HAMBURGER AND CHILI 

Best of Food - Reasonable Prices 
322 VIRGINIA AVENUE VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-8797 Fuller Paints. Oils and Varnishes 

H. E. WILDER HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware - Homewares - Plumbing Fixtures and Repairs 
627 MARIN STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

William Kamilas 



Phone Vallejo 3-8561 



CRYSTAL MARKET 

Best Quality Fruits and Vegetables - Reasonable Prices 

610 MARIN STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



HOHLT'S FOUNTAIN 

410 VIRGINIA ST. and 1215 SONOMA ST. VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-9621 John Couliams, Prop. 

JOHN'S FOUNTAIN CAFE 

Excellent Service 



406 VIRGINIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



MORAN'S COFFEE SHOP 

We Age and Cut Our Own Meat . . . Steer Beef Only Used 
GEORGIA STREET WHARF VALLEJO. CALIF. 



MARE ISLAND FERRY 

VALLEJO CALIFORNIA 



CURLY COFFEE SHOP 

BEST OF FOOD 



6 I Sonoma Street 



Vallejo, Calif. 



"JOE" "FRED" 

MATHER BROTHERS 

AUTO REPAIRING — WELDING 
6041 Mission Street DElaware 3426 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



PALACE BILLIARDS 

LEO H. RASMUSSEN 



423> 2 GEORGIA STREET 



Phone 3-9861 



Vallejo, Calif. 



PHONE 2981 WM. HOLDORF 

DEPOT CAFE 

CHICKEN BILL'S 
618 Sonoma Street VALLEJO 



HOTEL SOLAMO 

COMFORT FOR THE TRAVELER 



Marin Street 



VaUejo 



Compliments of 

HAPPYLAND AMUSEMENT SPOT 



433 Georgia Street 



Vallejo, California 



VANCE HARRIS 



HAROLD STEVENS 



Relay — Towne Club — 324 Club 

DINE AND DANCE 



42 1 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



HOME BAKERY 

337 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Telephone 1319 

VICTOR'S GARAGE 

BUICK AND CHEVROLET SPECIALISTS 

Genera] Auto Repairing — Personal Service Always 

SONOMA and PENNSYLVANIA STREETS Vallejo, Calif. 

BLONDE'S CAFE 

BLONDEE MEYER, Proprietor 
323 SANTA CLARA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Telephone 3-6414 Edna L. Colson 

SOLANO HOTEL 

COMFORT FOR TRAVELERS 
MARIN STREET VALLEJO CAL. 

Telephone 230 

BURKE'S TAVERN 

D. G. (JAMES) STATHAK1S. Manager 
411 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 

Phone 3-7898 

SOLANO PRODUCE CO. 

28 BRANCIFORTE STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone 2-0712 

DR. ROBERT H. JACKSON 

OPTOMETRIST 



402 GEORGIA STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



LIVING HEROES OF S. F. P. D. 

(Continued from Page 9) 

was in the hospital corridor and he demanded to see her. 
He did, and after a few seconds she brought back the 
message to the anxiously-awaiting parents that the mar- 
riage would take place on the appointed day. True 
enough, the marriage did take place in two weeks." 

Here Commentator Fenger asked Engler to take over: 

"'Martin Lee and I were in a radio car when we heard 
the radio flash "Holdup now going on at 409 Divisadero." 
We got there in less than a minute. We found the front 
door, locked. A brave woman who lived next door grab- 
bed me by the arm and said, "I can get you in. Come 
with me." She led us to a passageway connecting her 
house with the place of the holdup. We went through 
a window. In the first room we entered there was no one. 
We then came to a hallway, with a kitchen in the rear. 
As we were walking toward the kitchen, I saw two 
masked men having guns and holding up the people. 
They didn't see us and we had hoped that we could take 
them without shooting. I was in the lead and as I reached 
the kitchen door, I told them to throw up their hands. 
With that the bandit Shenk swung around and fired his 
4 5 -caliber automatic pistol. The bullet took effect. The 
hallway was narrow and my position, after being shot, 
prevented my partner from using his firearm. Shenk 
seized the proprietor's wife and made her a hostage in his 
attempt to escape. 

"We followed, and when we got to the top of the back 
stairs we saw Inspectors McMahon, McCann and John J. 
Cannon, who had already gone into action. Shenk was 
the only one to reach the back stairs. The other holdup- 
man, Avilano, was discovered hiding in a closet close to 
the back door. Though carrying a gun, he surrendered 
to Lee and myself without further resistance. I was weak- 
ened by the loss of blood and was taken to the hospital 
immediately. 

Inspector McMahon closed the broadcast as follows: 

Inspectors McCann, Jack Cannon and I heard the radio 
flash. We got there fast and as we did, a spectator shout- 
ed, "The stickup men are now leaving through the back 
door." We gained entrance to the rear. We did not yet 
know of the presence of Officers Engler and Lee. As we 
got to the rear I saw a women being used as a shield by 
Shenk, an ex-convict whom I had previously arrested. Mc- 
Cann said, "Let that woman go and come down by your- 
self with your hands up." Shenk shouted, No, you'll 
have to kill her to get me." At the same time he was 
holding his pistol and about to direct it toward us. 

"We couldn't delay, but we had to be careful so as 
not to injure the woman. As he raised his gun, I fired 
two shots, both of which took effect in the arm which held 
the gun. The woman fell and rolled down the stairs. 
The gun dropped from Shenk's wounded hand and he too 
fell and rolled down the stairs. 

Moments, of course, seemed hours because an inno- 
cent woman was involved and we could not tell whether 
our fire had escaped her. Fortunately it did, and she got 



out of the incident unhurt. We arrested Shenk, and 
Engler and Lee arrested Avilano. Both bandits were con- 
victed and are now confined in Folsom State Prison. They 
were and are desperate men with long criminal records 
and state prison is the place for them." 



BILL LOPES, Mgr. 



PHONE 389 



VALLEJO RECREATION ALLEYS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE — Ladies Invited 



PHONE VALLEJO 8 

TONEY'S NAVY MARKET 

MEATS-FISH-POULTRY-GREEN AND DRY STORES 

Special Attention Given To All Sea Store Orders 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL JOBBERS 

433 Georgia Street, Redmen Building Vallejo, Calif. 

DIAL 3-9145 

CITY CLEANERS & DYERS 

"Quality, Plus Service" 
315 Maine Street Vallejo, California 

PHONE VA. 3971 

VETERAN'S CAFE 

Best of Meals and Reasonable Prices 
218ft GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

SERVICE is what we give you — and PLENTY of it 

EAGLE CAFE 

Phone 1338 417 Santa Clara Street Vallejo 

Mrs. Minnie Thanos Phone 3-9231 

TOM'S PLACE 

MIXED DRINKS — BEER and WINE 
229 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phones WEst 6517-6518 — 

Mme. L. Loustau 8C Co. French Laundrey 

Office: 3650-64 Sacramento Street 

WE CALL AND DELIVER TO SAN MATEO, BURLINGAME, PALO 

ALTO and WOODSIDE TWICE A WEEK. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

CLYDE C. SIMMONS 

NASH MOTOR CARS 



Body, Fender and Painting 
Sonoma at York Street 



VALLEJO 



PHONE 3-4266 



VICTOR'S GARAGE 



BUICK AND CHEVROLET SPECIALISTS 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 

PERSONAL SERVICE ALWAYS 

Sonoma and Pennsylvania Streets Vallejo, California 



Phone Fillmore 2016-17 



A. PENINOU 



FRENCH LAUNDRY 
3415-3419 Sacramento Street San Francisco, Calif. 



BULLOCK'S GROCERY 



318 NAPA STREET 



Phom 3-9687 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Telephone 3-7473 



SPEROS GROCERY 



401 Pennsylvania Street 



Vallejo, California 



Office Phone DElaware 23 7 1 
We Carry Full Insurance 



Res. Phones RAndolph 6766 
DElaware 2601— Burl. 6733 



HANSON BROTHERS 



HOUSE MOVING and RAISING 

Houses Bought and Sold 
All Work First Class 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

5840 Mission Street 
San Francisco 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



CAPTAIN'S COMMENDATIONS 

The Meritorious Conduct Board recently heard the 
following applications and determined that while the 
matters involved did not call for a commendation or ci- 
tation by the Police Commission or by the Chief of Police, 
under the Rules and Regulations of the Police Depart- 
ment, they nevertheless involved close attention to police 
duty and were worthy of commendation by Company 
Commanders under whom the men perform police duty: 
POLICE OFFICER WILLIAM P. KAVANAUGH, 
and JAMES A. CARPENETI, Company A, in connec- 
tion with services performed by them on February 8, 
1943, in the arrest of Milton Effman and fames Stone, 
ex-convicts who had planned to holdup the Florsheim 
Shoe Store at 884 Market Street. 
POLICE OFFICER FRANK E. WOODS, Company K, 
in connection with services performed by him on March 
6. 1943, in the arrest of four ex-convicts. 
POLICE OFFICER JOHN D. SULLIVAN, Headquar- 
ters Company, and ROBERT A. LINDSKOG, Com- 
pany K, Accident Prevention Bureau, respectively, in 
connection with services performed by them on Thurs- 
day, December 3, 1942, in the arrest of one Dean 
Chadwic\ who had threatened with a cleaver several 
members of a "Red Stac\ tug" tied up at pier 23. 
POLICE OFFICER FRANK J. HUGHES, and EU- 
GENE J. BORZONE, Company B, in connection with 
services performed by them on Monday, April 12, 1943, 
when they arrested three men on "drun\ rolling" 
charges. 
POLICE OFFICER WILLIAM J. BRADLEY, and 
ROBERT C. CALDWELL, Company E, in connection 
with services performed by them on fuly 16, 1942, in 
the attempt made by them to apprehend three suspects 
in a holdup car. 
SERGEANT FRANK P. RHODES, Company G. in 
connection with services performed by him on May 31, 
1942, in the arrest of two men who burglarized a 
Safeway Store at 3520 Balboa Street. 
POLICE OFFICER KENNETH A. P. TILLES, Com- 
pany K, in connection with the services performed by 
him on August 3, 1942, in the arrest of one William J. 
Walter who was discovered driving a stolen auto- 
mobile and who later confessed to burglary charges. 
POLICE OFFICER JACK E. CHANEY, and 
MICHAEL J. DOHERTY, Company K, in connection 
with the services performed by them on August 6, 
1942, in the arrest of one Raymond ?\[eal, a criminal 
wanted by this department. 

Phone Piedmont 0174 

PAUL J. KOENIG 

Moss Cleaners 



L. RIZNIK & SON 

POLICE UNIFORMS and EQUIPMENT 

171 GROVE STREET at VAN NESS Opp. City Hall 

Telephone UNderhill 4824 San Francisco 



Telephone SUtter 9804 



HELVETIA HOTEL 



Jack Gschwend, Mgr. 
637-641 California Street 



San Francisco 



CLEVELAND TRACTOR CO. 

2660 HARRISON STREET — SAN FRANCISCO 

Office Phone Mission 4348 Residence Phone RAndolph 4655 

Builders Exchange SUtter 6700 

RELIABLE PAINTING CO. 

HOUSE, OFFICE PAINTING & WOOD FINISHING 

Tinting and Paper Hanging in All its Branches 

3247 19th Street, Corner Shotwell San Francisco 

Valencia 3779 SERVING ONLY THE BEST 

MUFF'S 

LIQUORS — WINES — BEER 
4007 - 24th Street San Francisco 

SUiter 5008 

CONTINENTAL TRUNK CO. 

Manufactuerers and Jobbers 

TRUNKS — SUITCASES — LEATHER GOODS 

AIRPLANE LUGGAGE— ATHLETIC TRUNKS 

199 Second Street San Francisco 



Phone MArket 6755 

JACK PINSLER 

CIGARS — WINE — LIQUOR 
1698 Market Street, Corner Gough 



San Francisco 



Valencia 3322 



We Give More 



STEWART CHEVROLET CO. 

M. A. STEWART 

3146 Mission Street — San Francisco 

GArfield 4458 

ELECTRIC NOVELTY WORKS 

METAL PARTS 
965 Howard Street — San Francisco, California 

Telephone SUtter 0514 

KINGWELL BROTHERS, LTD. 

KING BRONZE BUSHINGS * OILITE BUSHINGS 

444 NATOMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Los Angeles Seattle Portland Oakland Honolulu Manila 

METAL PRODUCTS • TOOLS • DIES • MACHINE WORK 

WEICHHART-FAIRMONT 

Manufacturing Company 

237 Natoma Street — San Francisco 

Telephone 424 

SANITARY PRODUCE CO. 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
109 VIRGINIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Telephone 993 -J 

VALLEJO FRENCH LAUNDRY 



LEON B. VIGNEAU 



3 14 MAINE STREET 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



PIEDMONT at MacARTHUR BLVD. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Walter B. Wells. Thomas L. Wells. Props. Telephone 181 

HOTEL BERNARD 

Since 1874 

Family Hotel-Steam Heat-Baths-Showers 

Attractive Weekly. Monthly Rates 

3 17-A CEORGIA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



MODERN SHEET METAL SHOP 

Nelson E- Butler, Owner 
1608 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 4-37 10 

The Art-California Cleaning Works 

Cleaners and Dyers 



1647 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone 3-9639 Tina Nordstrom Cox, Mgr. 

Rates Reasonable - Day, Week or Month 

California Hotel Georgia Court 

1816 SONOMA ST. VALLEJO, CALIF. 1218 GEORGIA ST. 

Phone 3-6879 

PARK-IN MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Fresh Meats 
SOLANO AVE. and EIGHTH STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-3843 



Towing Service Night and Day 



H 



enncksen 



Sonoma Service 8C Repair Station 

Automobile Repairing - Gas - Grease - Oils 



SONOMA at TENNESSEE STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



HUSSE Y'S 

Bar and Cafe 
1101 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

KRAINERT SHEET METAL 

1524 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

ALAMEDA BOWL 

MAJOR F. A. JACOBS - A. L. HANSEN 
2418 SANTA CLARA AVENUE ALAMEDA, CALIF. 

Phone ANdover 0686 

Atkinson Mill & Manuacturinc* Co. 

Mitlwork Cabinets, Doors, Sash, Cord Window Weights, Frames 
CHAPMAN STREET and DERBY AVENUE OAKLAND, I. CALIF. 

BUY WAR BONDS 



Phone HEmlock 6130 



Omer R. Proudfoot 



REYNOLDS METALS COMPANY 

Incorporated 
345 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 
A FRIEND 

Dial 3-9876 Meet us at the Herb Weyhe 

NEW CHATEAU 

Bar - Cafe - Cocktail Lounge 
409 NAPA ROAD (Napa at Tennessee) VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Courtesy of 
NELSON L. BUTLER 

MODERN SHEET METAL WORKS 

1608 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Wilson's Service Station and Auto Court 

1919 SONOMA STREET VALLEJO. CALIF. 



40 12th Street 



FRANK GALLO 

PAINTS— WALL PAPER 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HEmlock 8644 



Compliments of the 

Grand Lodge Independent Order of Odd Fellows 

26 7th Street — San Francisco 

Frank D. Macbeth Frank R. Biggs 

Grand Secretary Grand Master 

COMPLIMENTS 

GRIDLEY REALTY CO. 

4324 Geary Boulevard San Francisco 

WAInut 1737 WEst 9742 

POST ST. AUCTION STUDIO 

We Pay Cash for Furnished Houses, Homes, Odd Pieces, Radios 

and Etc — Auction Every Wednesday 

S. Kevich, Auctioneer 

1861-67 Post Street San Francisco 

NO AGE LIMIT 

SALESMEN WANTED 

Salary and Commissions — See 

M. F. BRANCH, State Manager 

PEOPLES LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

240 Sansome St. — Phone EX. 1716 

COMPLIMENTS 

UNITED LANGENDORF BAKERIES 

SAN FRANCISCO 
TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 1957 

WILKIE, HOLZHEISER & CO. 

698 Market Street 
LIQUOR — CIGARS and CIGARETTES 

UNderhill 39S0 

HARRY McCUNE SOUND SERVICE 

RENTAL - SERVICE 
10 BRADY STREET — SAN FRANCISCO 

RAndolph 8S35 

BORELLO'S CLEANING 8C DYEING CO. 

Henry Greenberg 
2695 San Bruno Avenue — — San Francisco, California 

K ^JULIUS S. ^ 

trodeau 

INC. 

FUNFRAL DIRECTORS 

41 Van Ness Avenue near Market 



GILBREATH CHEMICAL CO. 

383 BRANNAN STREET — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone SUtter 7537 



Contract Hauling Mission 7677 

COMMERCIAL TRUCK SERVICE 

2596 OAKDALE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

SAN FRANCISCO SPORTS CENTER 

BOWLING— BADMINTON— TABLE TENNIS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE— FOUNTAIN— LUNCH 

29th and Mission 

GArfield 6068 

FELIX LAURICELLA 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
700 MILLS BUILDING San Francisco 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 194: 



Phone TEmplebar 3430 

JOE CLAPP'S PERSONAL SERVICE 

Authorized Sales-Service for Auto-Lite, Delco-Remy Purolator 
Sterling Bendix Lamps, Carter Carburetor 



Phone KEllog 4-5010 



OSCAR WILSON, SERVICE 

MOTOR - BODY - FENDER WORK - PAINTING 



2530 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF 



Phone SWeetwood 1700 



1407 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



ELMHURST PACKERS, INC. 

Canned Fruits and Vegetables 



SAN PABLO CLUB 

Dancing - Prices Reasonable - the Very Best of Service 



801 NINETY-EIGHTH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAN PABLO 



CALIFORNIA 



BUY WAR BONDS 



MEYERS JEWELERS 

"The House of Perfect Diamonds" 
ISADORE MEYER. President 



BEER 

Distributed by 

ADAMS BROTHERS 



541 E. I2TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: Hlgate 4014-15 

CHARLES W. REAL 

Executive Secretary and Business Manager 
Brotherhood of Teamsters and Auto Truck Drivers, Local No. 70 



TEAMSTERS HALL, 826 WEST STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Atlas Imperial Diesel Engine Co. 



Executive Offices 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



HAGSTROM'S Friendly Food Stores 

Quality Foods at Lowest Prices is not only a slogan with Hagstrom's 
Stores but a FACT! Whether it is Nationally Famous brands of 
canned goods or meat, dairy products, etc., you'll find a wider selec- 
tion at Consistent Savings if you do ALL of your food buying at 
HAGSTROM'S. 



Phone Piedmont 1497 

Automotive Painting and Lettering Service 
to the DISCRIMINATE at 

WILLIAM H. STREHLE CO. 



608 MARIN STREET 
Phone 3-6438 
VALLEJO 



CALIFORNIA 



1123 FIRST STREET 

Phone 492 

NAPA 



Phones HIghgate 8463 - 8776 



CENTRAL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Cash and Carry Service - Delivery Service 



425 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone 3-9938 



Geo. Beck, Owner 



VALLEJO FOOD CENTER 



616 MAIN STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-4264 



Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 



HAROLD BEASLEY 

Plumbing Contractor - Sales, Service, Supplies 

Plumbing Fixtures - Water Heaters - Gas Floor Furnaces 

Circulating Heaters - Repair Work Our Specialty 



916 TENNESSE STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-9937, 2-1208 



Navone Garibotti 



M. Bowes 



CARQUINEZ TRAILER COURT 

Welcome! Trailer Camp - We know our camp will please you! 



271 U. S. HIGHWAY 40 



VALLEJO. CALIF. 



494 36TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. , 465 4TH STREET 



Columbia Wood 8C Metal Preservative Co. 

BERKELEY. CALIF. 



September, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



INSIDE SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 
ASSOCIATION INC. 

By George William Wood 

One of the most active and intensely progressive organ- 
izations in our city, is the Inside Special Police Officers 
Association, Inc. Since its organization less than one year 
ago, more than two-hundred'seventy-five members have 
been added to its roster. The confidence and prestige which 
has become so pronounced, comes from co-ordinating in- 
telligence and integrity, into the organization. 

Only men, who are duly qualified by high standing 
character, are contacted, to operate in its work. Being 
closely associated with the San Francisco regular Police 
Department, in its essential work, it becomes at once a 
valuable asset to our commonwealth. Under the able 
management of its officers, only men of quality are ever 
offered to protect properties entrusted to their care. When 
emergencies arise, wherein Special Police Guards are 
asked for, only men of highest integrity are contacted for 
that duty. 

Secretary Mervin Colen, states that, his busiest hours, 
are those around midnight. He has always been able to 
contact and have placed, capable, and dependable Officers, 
whenever called upon. Time, being the essence of one's 
need in the emergency. He invites those who might be 
in need of trustworthy protection, to call upon him at 
any hour, day or night. 

Through the vigilant alertness of these Special Police 
Officers, in their multifarious duties, it often happens 
that malefactors and miscreants are pointed out to bz 
regular Policeman and their apprehension made possible. 

It was only recently that the President, Thomas J. 
Lynch, apprehended a motorman masquerading as a 
Policeman, at the entrance of a Theatre, which was in 
his charge at the time; thus, one more of the "distorted" 
individuals was removed from circulation. 

While the duties of the Special Police Officers are at 
no time, meant to take the place of, usurp the power, or 
in any manner infringe the duties imposed upon the reg- 
ular force, yet, they are ever mindful of their oath given 
to maintain law and order and to protect society from 
the evils of crime, in all its forms. 

During these days of war, the Association has extended 
itself in the aid of War Bonds and Stamps. The care of 
the sick, and distressed, are a no small part of the re- 
sponsibilities of its valuable staff of officers. As a grow- 
ing and valuable adjunct in the betterment of our city's 
care during these trying days, the best evidence is that, 
at the last regular meeting, organizer, Harry Holtzman. 
inscribed the names of fifteen new members. 

Phone OLympic 8528 

Central Sheet Metal and Roofing Co. 

General Sheet Metal Work and Roofing - Complete Roof and Sheet 

Metal Job - Ventilating and Skylights 

Labeled Underwriters Firedoor, Kalamein Door, Jambs and Trim 



MANUEL FERNANDES TAVERN 

714 FIRST STREET 
BENECIA, CALIFORNIA 

LAkehurst 2-7761 • • • Piedmont 7744 

HOSPITAL AMBULANCE SERVICE 

A BETTER SERVICE 



571 Fairmount Avenue 



OAKLAND 



Piedmont 0185 

PEERLESS LAUNDRY CO. 

JOHN F. SNOW DYEING and CLEANING 
4701 Grove Street OAKLAND 

V/ood and Metal Patterns, Experimental Work Aluminum Castings 

Service Pattern 8C Aluminum Foundry Co. 

615 Twenty-Third Ave. Phone ANdover 3633 Oakland, Calii. 

Telephone KEIIog 2-6260 

VULCAN FOUNDRY COMPANY 

Specialists in High Test Irons and Special Service Castings 
Licensed Manufacturers of MEEHANITE 



4401 San Leandro Street 



Oakland 



—DRINK- 
REGAL PALE BEER 

KRAMM DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 
OAKLAND 



COMPLIMENTS 



THE OAKLAND ICE RINK 



14th & Grove Street 



OAKLAND 



Telephon3 SWeetwood 0356 

MASKELLOIL 

Alameda County Distributor of 

MOHAWK GASOLINE AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

100 Per Cent Pure Pennsylvania Oils 



14210 East Fourteenth Street 



San Leandro, Calif. 



3246 ETTIE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 9051 Tom Foley. Prop. 

TOM'S OLD CORNER 

Best Draught Beer in Town - Assorted Wines and Liquors 
A Good Place to Meet Your Friends 

<.1TH and ADELINE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, J 94 3 



NATIONAL SAFETY CONGRESS TO 
BE HELD IN CHICAGO, OCTOBER 5-7. 

Production won't win the war unless finished prod- 
ucts reach the battlefronts and other points where they 
can be used against the enemy. 

Rapid, efficient movement of war material and per- 
sonnel means transportation — safe, swift transportation. 

To find a way to fully help in these important activities, 
traffic officers of states and cities throughout the nation 
will meet at the National Safety Congress in Chicago, 
October 5 to 7. 

The Congress is the annual convention of members of 
the National Safety Council and attracts thousands of 
safety leaders from all parts of the country. 

In addition to discussion of traffic problems as they 
affect police administration, other aspects of keeping 
wartime traffic moving safely and swiftly will be taken 
up at the Congress by representatives of such groups as 
traffic court prosecutors and judges, traffic engineers, 
public educators and others from every field of traffic 
regulation. 

Post-war problems also will be discussed in detail, with 
an effort made to anticipate significant changes confront- 
ing police and others in comparision with pre-war prob- 
lems. 

Representatives of police departments and other agen- 
cies related to traffic law enforcement will bring back 
from the National Safety Congress a wealth of ideas 
and samples of the other fellow's experience that will pay 
dividends throughout the year in the solutions of local 
problems. 

Such representatives, the Council says, are asked to 
bring with them a list of "hardest-to-solve" local problems. 
The Congress program has been set up to provide ample 
participation by members of the audience who need help 
or suggestions on particular problems. 

As a matter of fact, the entire program is based upon 
answers to a questionnaire which was sent earlier this 
year to a large list of representative police officers through- 
out the country by the National Safety Council's Com- 
mittee of City and State Police. This procedure guaran- 
tees that time won't be wasted on things not of current 
importance. 



Phone HEmlock 0750 



SAGERDAHL 



INDUSTRIAL ENAMELING CO. 

of California 
Architectural and Industrial Baked Enamel and Lacquer Finishes 



Hough Patent Boiler Feed Checks — Lane Life Boat 

Walter Kidde Ac Co., Inc.; Rich Smoke Detecting System; Lux Fira 

Extinguishing System; Selex-Zonit Fire Detection System 

HOUGH & EGBERT CO. 

Sales Agents for Marine Equipment 

GArfield 7207 

31 1 California Street San Francisco, Calif 



UNderhill 8261 



H. S. WATSON CO. 

Watson Spicer Flexible Shafts 

Watson- Brown- Lipe Auxiliary Transmissions 

Brown-Lipe Transmissions fit Power Take Offs 

Spicer Universal Joints 



1145 HARRISON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



VALLEJO FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

LEON B. VIGNEAU, Prop. 

314 Maine Street, Dial 2-1217 Vallejo, California 

EDWARD H. CASE WILLIAM H. WIGGINS 

TELEPHONE 3-7S44 

CHISHOLM 8c DICKEY 

THE FUNERAL HOME 
524 CAPITOL STREET VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



We Feature Good Coffee 



Service With a Smile 



SHAMROCK CAFE 

134 GEORGIA STREET 

GOOD ALL AMERICAN FOODS 
STEAKS - CHOPS - LUNCHES TO GO 



WE NEVER CLOSE 



VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



SOLANO MARKET 

Reguera & Morilla 
GROCERIES— FRUITS— MEATS 
6S3 Benicia Road Vallejo, Calif. 



Phone 691 



DOPY NORMAN'S CAFE 

A FRIEND TO EVERYONE 
124 GEORGIA STREET VALLEJO, CALIFORIA 



Office and Factory: 12 39 I 7TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone KEllog 3-2 121 



The Standard Since 1888 



PACIFIC TANK & PIPE CO. 

Division of Gorman Lumber Sales Company 
Cooling* Towers - Crossarms - Wood Tanks - Wood Pipe 



46l-> TIDEWATER AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



VALLEJO GARBAGE SERVICE 



408 VIRGINIA STREET 
VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-3 769 



D. R. Logie 



LOGIE'S GARAGE 

Complete Auto Service 



236 ILLINOIS STREET 



VALLEJO, CALIF. 



September, 1943 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 39 



Phone KEllog 2- 9950 STAN KNAPP PHONE 2-1209 

FRUITVALE BOWL TENNESSEE MARKET 

House of Hospitality __.. _„_,... 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET and DELICATESSEN 
BEER and SANDWICHES 

731-735 Tennessee Street Vallejo 

3 125 E. MTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Cable Address 'Marcalco" MAC " na D0C 

MARCHANT CALCULATING SMOKE SHOP AND CLUB ROOMS 

JIA/^IJTMr /-i-v TOBACCOS — CANDY— SOFT DRINKS 

MACHINE CO. 

S2S SACRAMENTO STREET VALLEJO 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA - 



SAN PABLO, CALIFORNIA 



MAHERS SUNDRIES STORE 

COCHRAN AND CELLI DRUG SUNDRIES lunches fountain 

CIGARS CANDY 

California's Oldest Chevrolet Dealer 

FIFTH & BROADWAY - TWELFTH & HARRISON OAKLAND 

Phone GLencourt 8161 

CARNATION COMPANY 

Fresh Milk and Ice Cream Division 

1310 FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

L.A. STUCK, M.D. 

EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

508 I6TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



PHONE VALLEJO 3-0883 

INTERNATIONAL RECREATION 

BARBER SHOP— POOL CLUB ROOM 
110 Georsi. Street VALLEJO 

Phone HEmlock «7»» 



J. C FLETCHER 

Factory RepreaemtatiTa 



1415 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



Phone KEllog 2 6 720 



BEEBE'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
EUREKA MILL 8C LUMBER CO. BREAKFAST-LUNCHES REASONABLE PRICES 



Lumber and Mill Work - Composition Roofing 
3 73 7 SAN LEANDRO STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



SANDWICHES 

1152 TWENTY-THIRD STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 



phone TRinidad 76 76 HEAFEY-MOORE COMPANY 

( Incorporated ) 

McGUIRE AND HESTER general contractors 

PIPE LINE CONTRACTORS 



344 HIGH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



796 66TH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS . 

with 



QQjtwfot 




Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, J 943 



JOHN EDGAR HOOVER 

( Continued from Page 8) 
ion on law enforcement problems. But there still remains, 
to besmirch the good name of journalism, certain psycho- 
pathic Canard purveyors and others who, from motives 
best known to themselves, are constantly seeking to un- 
dermine public confidence in law enforcement agencies. 
These oracles of disaster, who by some rare gift are able 
to answer every question, at least in their own estimation, 
should have the opportunity sometime to face a practical 
problem and wrestle with reality. 

I think that every law enforcement administrator, when 
such situations arise, should take steps at once to insure 
that the facts are known to the public. This will, of course, 
require courage. But, the cause we serve is greater than 
any one_,of ,p,, , . 

Another 1 trend' which is again manifesting itself is the 
te'rfde'hcy' on the part of some motion picture producers 
to return to the formula which glorifies the criminal and 
ridicules the law enforcement officer. This, combined 
with the gross distortion of historical facts indulged in by 
certain segments of the motion picture industry, should 
receive the serious thought of the mothers and fathers of 
this Nation. You know how much damage such pictures 
can do in warping the impressionable minds of our Ameri- 
can youth. Whenever any force seeks to glorify gangster- 
ism and prostitute history, then it is time for those inter- 
ested in law and order and real freedom to let themselves 
be heard. 

Another problem which is rapidly reaching flood time 
proportions involves civil violence, race riots, and insidi- 
ous campaigns against minority groups. It is a national 
disgrace and a reflection upon all Americans that alter- 
cations between individuals can touch off community- 
wide conflagrations, which are often seized upon, by 
young teen-age hoodlums, of both sexes, to indulge in 
depredations of all kinds against property and persons. 

Law enforcement is not responsible for such outbreaks. 
But, once lawless bands of people begin to take matters 
into their own hands, law enforcement does become re- 
sponsible. When outbursts occur, pitting race against 
race, creed against creed, every officer must recognize his 
(Continued on Page 42) 

Phone TEmplebar 7823 

GARDINER MANUFACTURING CO. 

DROP - UPSET - HAMMER FORGINGS 



Compliments of 

SHEWAN-JONES, INC. 

LEJON BRANDY, WINES AND VERMOUTH 
HARTLEY BRANDY AND SHERRY 

Compliments of 

L. H. BUTCHER CO. 

15th and Vermont Sts. 
San Francisco, No. 1 



Compliments of 

HASLETT WAREHOUSE CO. 



240 Battery St. 



San Francisco 



TUxedo 2281 TUxedo 2282 TUxedo 2283 

TOM KYNE 

No. 1 OPAL PLACE — off Taylor St., Between Turk and Market Sts. 
EXbrook 6502 

OREGON NEVADA CALIFORNIA 
FAST FREIGHT CO. 

J. A. Critsch, President 
675 BRANNAN ETREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone EXbrook 7175, 7176 

THE PACIFIC MOLASSES CO., LTD. 

MATSON BUILDING 

Cable address "CANEMOLA" San Francisco 

215 Market St. San Francisco 

COMPLIMENTS 



PALACE HOTEL 



2707 UNION STREET 



OAKLAND, 7. CALIF. 



Phone. BErkeley 4226 



Frank Andronico, Prop. 



PARKER SHOP MARKET 

Fruit - Groceries - Meats - Wine - Beer 
at Reasonable Prices 



COR. SONOMA- FRESNO STREETS 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ASSOCIATED-BANNING COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



San 



General Offices 
112 Market St. 
Francisco, California 



Telephone EXbrook 0330 



Los Angeles Office 

Berth 145, P. O. Box 000 

Wilmington, California 



Telephone Wilmington 930 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



* * i 

* t 

* * 

J Compliments of * 



J************************.********.***^ 



MINT CLUB 



$237 Georgia Street Vallejo, Calif. * 



I * I 

&*•***•*••••***•**•••••••*•*•••**••***** 



Rollers, Loaders 
Dump Trucks 



Shovels, Tractors 
Compressors 



A. J. McCOSKER 

TRUCKING & GRADING 

Phone AShberry 4833 
East Shore Highway 8C Cedar St. Berkeley 



Phone GLencourt 6861 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

HOGAN LUMBER CO. 

Quality Service 

Insulating, Plywood, Roofing Material 
Lumber and Mill Products Since 1888 

Millwork - Sash and Doors 
Second and Alice Streets Oakland, Calif. 



Phone OLympic 1517 



GOLDEN WEST MEAT CO. 

6541 Bay Street 
Stockyards, Emeryville, Calif. 



* 
* 

4 
* 



ARREST that old Mattress 
get an AIRFLEX 

You'll get deep, luxurious sleep on this sensitive, 
long-wearing mattress . . . and save money too! We 
sell direct to you at the manufacturers' price when 
you buy at our manufacturing store. Save from #5.55 
to #25.50. Mattresses from #10.95 to #49.50. Budget 
terms. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



***++*++*+******+*+***++++*+++****+*++ 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks. 

Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants 
fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 



SCHUMER 

Stevedoring Company 



Joe Schumer 



Pier 29 



San Francisco 



g"a~6"o'o'o~a'o'o'o"a ae a a a a a a a'a'o'tt a o o~o~o'o'a a a - a~a 'aa a a a r 



I 



Invest Your Money in War Bonds ° 



I Pay Cash and Save at 

\ WEINSTEIN CO. 

> 

I 1041 Market 615 Market 119 Post 

I 100 Market 1620 Polk St. 

PPP P PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP0PP00PP0 Q OJ 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, 1943 



JOHN EDGAR HOOVER 

(Continued from Page 41) 

responsibility and realize that the only intelligent course 
of action is to adopt vigorous, prompt, and firm measures 
to restore peace. If force must be met by force, see to it 
that the protectors of law and order are marshalled in 
superior strength without delay and that they function 
for the good of all, with proper regard for the rights of 
all. 

The real trouble causing these public outbreaks lies 
underneath, and we of law enforcement have a right to 
expect that the situation be recognized and corrected by 
those civic forces directly charged with such responsibili- 
ties. We are fighting for freedom of speech, but I hope 
the day will come when it will be recognized that freedom 
of speech does not carry with it the license to destroy, 
incite, subvert, and misrepresent the truth. Persecution 
or discrimination that takes place far away is often much 
easier to recognize than that which occurs in our own 
community, yet sane tolerance and democracy, like charity, 
ought to begin at home. 

Our enemies in the war on crime include others than 
those who murder, rob, and steal. We have the harborers, 
the perjurers, and that countless class of criminal scum 
that subsist on the crumbs from the tables of the criminal 
overlords. And these include the crooked politican, the 
war racketeer, and the professional loose-mouthed, vac- 
uum-minded rabble-rousers who subsist on the sweat and 
toil of the decent law-abiding citizen. 

Among the enemies of society, we also must include 
those operators of dens of inquity, debauchery and crime, 
whose love of money eclipses their sense of decency. 

Another element that is just as dangerous, yet less 
apparent until brought into bold relief by the spotlight 
of public attention, is the subversive group — those termites 
of discontent and discord, always alert to seize upon racial 
differences, economic stresses and political difficulties to 
advance their selfish and venal purposes. These "ism" 
termites scoff at our democracy and belittle the cherished 
freedom, liberty and fair play that characterize America. 
The threat against the American people from within is 
not merely a Nazi threat. It is the insidious infection of 
other foreign "isms" creeping up the pillars of the Re- 
public under the false guise of Democracy. 

I am sure you will agree that delinquent and thought- 
less parents are another problem facing us today. Some 
are victims of circumstances, but others, by their dis- 
regard of parental responsibilities and their frenzied 
chase after the extra pleasures or dollars available in 
these extraordinary times, forget the most sacred duty 
of all — that of rearing their children as self-respecting, 
law-abiding citizens who truly are worthy of the name 
American. The facts are stark and revealing, and pos- 
sibly hold the key to this sad situation. Time and time 
again, children have admitted they did not consider their 
fathers as representative of honorable manhood, or that 
they were ashamed of them; and some have even said 
they were ashamed of their mothers. 

What is needed above all else is more enlightened par- 



Phone: DOuglas 0744. San Francisco HI gate 53 I 8, Oakland 

Daniel Gallagher Teaming, Mercantile 8C 
Realty Company 

Foundry and Ship Supplies - General Dravage 
172 BEALE ST., SAN FRANCISCO 2309 ADELINE ST.. OAKLAND 

Compliments of 

PACIFIC TOOL &, SUPPLY CO. 

Tools and Shop Supplies 



OAKLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GLencourt 6716, 6717 

M. P. PINNELLA 

Alameda County Distributor 
SEASIDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



2 151 WEST STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 2644 



BRYAN HAMMOND 

REAL ESTATE and FIRE INSURANCE 
Homes, Income Properties and Exchange 



3810 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

THE RITEX COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Automatic Screw Machine Products 



182 1 FIFTH STREET 



BERKELEY. 2, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

SIMSET MANUFACTURING CO. 



1 195 65TH STREET 



OAKLAND, ft, CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 442 I 



P. J. Lammers 



East Bay Refrigerator and Fixture Co. 

Commercial Refrigerators and Refrigerator Display Counters 
Detail Arrangements of Fixtures and Estimates Furnished 
Walk-in Coolers, Porcelain Enamel Store Interiors & Exteriors 



941 A1LEEN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 3 735 



LITTLE GIANT INC 



Little Giant Tray Washer 



4222 HOLLIS STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



September, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



Phone TWinoaks 5522 



HURLEY MARINE 
WORKS INC. 



Foot of Fifth Avenue 
Oakland, Calif. 



gTrrg~gTnrB'8 - a~irinrinnnnrB a 8"B'a - a'tt'6'o'o'tt'a"a~6~o~mnnnnp; 



■ 



GRIff'S... 

New Hours: 5 a.m. 'til 2 a.m. 

Serving a Special Breakfast for 

Defense Workers 

Your Choice of: Bacon and Eggs, Waffles, Cereals, 
Ham and Eggs, Hot Cakes, Etc. 

We Specialize in 

STEAKS & CHICKEN 

Our Chef Serves Only The Finest of Foods 

Inspect Our Kitchen. Our equipment is the finest 
and complete throughout 

Counter, Booths, Dining Room, Banquet Room 

GRIFF'S STEAK HOUSE 

At 919 San Pablo Avenue 

"Albany's Favorite Place to Eat" 



I 



I 



Buy War Bonds and Stamps 

?POO0OOO00P8BPPPPPPPPPPPPPaPB88 gJULft 



-8JULPJ2 



Phone HUmboldt 9300 



ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS 
CORPORATION 



ZEON ELECTRICAL 
ADVERTISING 



950 30th Street 



Oakland, Calif. 



HYDRAULIC DREDGING 
COMPANY, LTD. 

CENTRAL BANK BUILDING 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



■ ■ 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



September, J 943 



ents, to create better homes and take proper care of their 
children. Keep boys and girls from becoming criminals 
when they are young, and you can keep most of them 
from becoming criminals later in life. 

Last year, the number of persons under voting age 
who were arrested and fingerprinted reached alarming 
proportions. Today, the situation is worse. The tragedy 
revealed by our latest survey is found in the fact that 
the arrests of boys and girls 17 years of age increased 
17.7 per cent. In reviewing further the trends for the 
past six months, we find an 89 per cent increase in the 
arrests of girls for offenses against common decency. 
These girls are the future mothers of America. It is 
tragic that so many lives are ruined which could be 
useful, simply because right influences were not present 
at the right time. 

Here is a real problem that calls for the intelligence 
an active interest of every police agency in the land. But 
this is not law enforcement's problem alone. Our American 
homes, churches, schools, and youth-serving organizations 
all must redouble their efforts to help young people make 
their way successfully to maturity. Law enforcement, 
having direct contact with crime, is in a better position to 
curb the perpetration of the actual offense than any other 
group, but the ultimate solution must come from the 
home, the church, and the school, through intelligent 
cooperation. 

Yet law enforcement must be in the forefront of crime 
prevention. It is not alone the problem for sociologists, 
psychologists, and social reformers. It must be met with 
realism, understanding and discipline, untempered with 
coddling, and free from the cloudy mysticisms of new- 
fangled educational philosophies. 

We still have with us those easy-going people who are 
too busy to vote, too tired to attend community functions 
or to take a real interest in these matters of public im- 
portance. The sad truth is that most of them still deserve 
the privileges and the unmatched freedoms we enjoy in 
'his greatest of all lands. They have the fruits without 
contributing to the labor for its production. 

But therein lies a challenge to you. For every one of 
these indifferent persons and every one of the delinquent 
parents you can convert by education and effort into an 
active supporter of law and order, so much easier will 
your job become. Citizens must be made to feel that they 
are a real part of the war; they must know the worst as 
well as the best. 

In meeting your problems, please keep constantly in 
mind that the FBI is ready every hour of the day and 
night to assist you. Assuredly, the security of America is 
law enforcement's greatest responsibility. Our problems, 
it is true, are major ones. They will try the patience and 
test the perseverance of strong men. But our war is a holy 
crusade. It is to protect the dearest of all our institutions — 
the home and the hearthside, under the double blessing of 
liberty and freedom. America must do some straight 
thinking and plain speaking in this hour of crisis. We are 
fighting not only the greatest military war of our history, 
but also the skulking enemies within our own gates. 




CALIFORNIA 


POTTERY 


COMPANY 


* 


NILES, CALIFORNIA 



ROBERT WALL flCf *furs 

146 GEARY STREET 

Famous for Fine Furs and Fair Dealing in 
San Francisco for 50 Years. 



Telephone GArfield 7010 

Connecting All Departments 

GLASER BROS. 

WHOLESALE 

CIGARS and TOBACCOS 

WINES — LIQUORS — CANDIES 

Oakland Sacramento 

900 Harrison Street 916 12th Street 

475 FOURTH STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



In Havana It's Sloppy Joe's 
In New Yory It's Lindy's 

Do You Like Good Food? 



SPAGHETTI PETE'S 

401 SAN PABLO AVENUE 

(1 Block North of Richmond Sign) 

SPECIALIZING IN FRENCH FRIED, 

SHRIMP, SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN, 

HOME-COOKED SPAGHETTI and RAVIOLI 



In New Orleans it's Antoine's 
IN RICHMOND IT'S SPAGHETTI PETE'S 



Compliments 

of o 

Friend 



~*$jjjper 




Mainliner Schedules to Los An- 
geles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, 
New York, Washington, D. C, 
and other important cities. 

UNITED 
AIRLINES 

San Francisco DOuglas 1681 

400 Post Street 

Oakland TWinoaks 1681 

1940 Broadway 



Compliments of 

UNIVERSAL 
MUSIC CO. 

SAM TESSLER, Prop. 



1033 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 

Phone WAlnut 2131 



Wurlitzer Phonograph Music 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



Sac. 54?, P. L & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Permit 3172 



SHREVE 



ESTABLISHED 1852 




SHREVE PRICES ARE COMPETITIVE 

When you are ready to look for a diamond ring, a watch, 
or silverware, come to Shreve's. Our prices are always 
reasonable when actually compared with prices of like 
articles elsewhere. 

SHREVE & COMPANY 

Store: Post Street at Grant Avenue 

Factory: 539-551 Bryant Street 



M 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY COMPANY, Ltd, 

ana 

PACIFIC METALS COMPANY, Ltd. 

3100 Nineteenth Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 



» 



s 




AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 




October 



AN 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



September, 1941 



COMPLIMENTS 

JOHNSON, DRAKE 
& PIPER, INC. 

General Contractors 



* 



OAKLAND 



ALAMEDA 



Office: HUmboldt 1700 
Res.: GLencourt 3660 



A. T. BECKETT 

General Contractor 



C V> 



366 40TH STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 




Let's Get Things Done! 



ROGER 

LAPHAM 
for Mayor 



ELECTION NOVEMBER 2 

• 

We've Outgrown 
Politicians! 



October, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



• 




Featured in This Issue 




Page 


Annual Meeting of State Peace Officers' 
Association 


3 


The President's Message 


. 6 


By Chief Alexander McAllister 




Auxiliary Police Review 


8 


Guard Against '"The Meanest Thief" . 


. 9 


Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association . 


. 10 ' 


The Navy and The Police 

By Vice Admiral John W. Greenslade 


12 


The Soldier Under Civil Law 


. 14 


By Captain Herbert E. Wenig, U. S. Army 




No. Calif. Police Communication Officers' 




Association Meeting 


15 


Suicides, Auto Deaths Fall, Trolley 

Fatalities Soar 


16 


The Battle on The Home Front 


. 17 


By Director John Edgar Hoover, FBI 




S. F. Police Department Buys $25,000 

War Bonds 


19 

20 


Try Your Hand at This List 


Bay Area Men Serve Now in Military Force 


. 22 


• 





Directory 



the Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors. Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 

Traffic Bureau Lt. Edward Pootel 635 Washington St. 

Acting Captain 
Dept. Secy Cut. John A Engler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 
Bur. of Personnel Lieut. George Healy Hall of Justice 

Residence -4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byrom J. Cetcheli. 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Central Capt. M. E. Mitcheli 635 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence - 438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan Drumm k Comm'l Sts 

Residence -WIS 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 

Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 

Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence - 2533 18th Avenue 

Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 

Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



when in Trouble Call SUtter 20*20 

When In Doubt Aiw ays At Y OUr se^ce 



Page 2 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL October, 1943 



Phone VAlencia 9102 - 2864 E. D. Kay. Mgr. p hone SUUer |5f>6 

S.S N u„^S?.L * u ^r.-I U ^..™2^ WESTATES PETROLEUM CORPORATION 

and Elactrical Appliances 
2301 MISSION STREET, at 19th SAN FRANCISCO 391 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 8245 Day or Night Frank E. Lawson. Prop. 

THE LAWSON ROOFING CO. 

BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS Contractors: Asphalt-Gravel Roofing - Composition Shingles 

Responsible Roofers since 1907 - Fully Insured 
130 STEINER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 5740 Dies. Jigs, Fixtures and Special Machinery Phone UNderhill 7161 

LATHE TOOL WORKS R. J. LEAHY CO. 

Fine Model and Experimental Work - Gear Cutting, Tool Work, Etc. Brass, Copper, Bronze and Nickel Silver Products 

General Machine Work „ „ „ „ 

37 CLEMENTINA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 48b E'GHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of ^ ,. 

r Compliments of 

GRAND LODGE OF CALIFORNIA ^ rt „„ T ~^~„ nn « ^ _ ,„ 

Order Sons of Italy in America ROSENBERG BROS. GRADING CO. 

678 GREEN STREET SAN FRANCISCO l2 OAK GROVE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArkst 925 1 



FRANK SERVETTI of 

Sales MOTORCYCLES Service 
375 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments 

of 

A FRIEND 



Phones: UNderhill 7519 - HEmlock 9096 Steamed Clams Phone EXbrook 8143 

SOUTH OF MARKET HAVEN FRANK KARP 

Liquors - Ray H. Coffman. Prop. Appraiser - Diamonds and Precious Stones 

98 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO ' 33 KEARNY STREET ROOM 201 SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 2 103 Jack Waltmon Sam Eisman 

Compliments of 

PHOTO & SOUND INCORPORATED BARNYARD CAVERN 

153 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO I <"- 3RD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

IZZY GOMEZ 



Phone SUtter 9496 The Best of Everything Jack McVeigh. Prop. 

THE CENTER CAFE 

Beer - Wine - Liquors and Lunches 



848 PACIFIC STREET SAN FRANCISCO 30 EMBARCADERO SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ATwater 0423 Larry Brady Ed Dowling Cy Sullivan Phone SUtter 2916 Restaurants and Hotels Supplied a Specialty 

BRADY & DOWLING P- MICHELETTI CO. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE Golden Gate Meat Market - Wholesale and Retail Butchers 

2 73 7 MISSION STREET SAN FRA NCISCO 316-522 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ORdway 6846 Everything For the Beauty and Barber Shop Phone Fillmore 9865 The Fun Spot of Fillmore" Gracie Sc Curley 

BAUER MANUFACTURING CO. THEVILLABAR 

Designers and Equippers Beer - Wines - Liquors 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 1 2 <» 7 TURK STREET, Corner Webster SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: WEst 8686 - V'Alnut 5895 

, ^V-, 1 ? DE n L ^ NE , Y BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 

Licensed Keal Estate Broker - Insurance 

1715 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of Phone SUtter 7427 

NORTHWEST ENGINEERING CO. TLOH FOOD SHOP 

Shovels - Draglines - Cranes To Please You, an Ambition - Making Friends Our Religion 

255 TENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 240 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of ^* n- SUtter 5342 In Calif. — Formerly California Simplex Distr. Co. 

SANTA ROSA CLARK DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

Bill Hurll Exclusive Wurlitzer Distributors for the Pacific Coast 

5809 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 4 15 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Ph. MOntrose 4842 Guaranteed Rebuilding and Service - All Makes 

SAN BRUNO CUT RATE PACIFIC ELECTRIC APPLIANCE CO. 

-r , .... _ . Vacuums, Sewing Machines, Washers, Ironers - Electric Appliances 

Tobaccos, Wines, Liquors FREE l nspecUon and Adjusting in Your Home 

542 SAN MATEO AVENUE SAN BRUNO. CALIF. 2409 IRVINC STREET George F. Komor SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 7035 

Compliments of 

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SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 

330 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 20TH and CYPRESS STREETS OAKLAND. CALIF 



; San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




±5§ PEACE OFFICERS' 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



OCTOBER, 1943 



No. 4 



Annual Meeting of State Peace Officers Association 



Held 



San Francisco October 11-12'13 in the Fairmont Hotel 



The Second War Conference, which marked the 23rd 
annual convention of the State Peace Officers of Cali- 
fornia was held in the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, 
October 11, 12 and 13. It was one of the mo;t important 
and best attended in the history of the association. 

Despite the travel difficulties members came from 




Chief Charles W. Dullea 
Host of Second War Conference 

every county in the state with the exception of a very 
few of these whose officers of the law were unable to be 
present, but who sent in their regrets. 

Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea, who was elected 
first vice-president, was the host of the convention, and 
he prepared as fine weather as could be desired and saw 
that there was plenty of entertainment for the delegates 
as well as their womenfolk. He was assisted in the enter- 
tainment of visitors by Deputy Chief Michael Riordan, 
Inspector John Butler, Inspector Percy Keneally, In- 
spector John Shilling, Captain of Inspectors Bernard Mc- 



Donald, Captain John Engler, Department Secretary, In- 
spectors Fred Bohr and William Hansen, of the Hotel 
Detail, Joseph Lee, Officers A. G. Arnaud and Wesley 
Murray, Inspector Bartholomew Lally, Director George 
Healy. 

The Association's president, Chief Alexander K. Mc- 
Allister of Sacramento, got the opening meeting off 
promptly at 10 a.m. and proceeded as the first official 
business to appoint Chief H. C. Grove of Dixon and 
Otis Bohn of the California Packing Corporation, as an 
escort committee composed of Assistant Chief Michael 
Riordan, Chief Robert Tracy of Oakland, Chief E. Ray 
Cato of the California Highway Patrol, Sheriff Robert 
Ware of Imperial, Chief Special Agent Nat J. L. Pieper, 
F.B.I. , San Francisco, and Chief V. B. Browne of Glen- 
dale. 

The Nation's colors were then presented by a squad of 
the Drum Corps of the San Francisco Police Department, 
and Armand Girard, noted radio singing star, sang the 
National Anthem. This was followed by the Pledge of 
Allegiance, and the Right Reverend Harold C. Collins, 
secretary of Archbishop John J. Mitty, pronounced the 
invocation. 

The escort of honor then presented Mayor Angelo J. 
Rossi, who made the address of welcome. 

He said that while San Francisco's population has 
soared to some 800,000 people and the Police Department 
was busy in maintaining order, he had instructed Chief 
Dullea to see that the visitors had a good time as the 
requirement of war would permit. He said that we were 
interested above all things in winning the war first. On 
behalf of the people of the city he bade all welcome and 
stated he hoped there would be another convention of the 
Association in this city at a not too far distance. 

Chief Dullea followed the Mayor in extending welcome 
to the peace officers and he in turn presented Walter Mc- 
Govern, President of the Police Commission, who spoke 
briefly and said the Police Department of San Francisco 
was run by policemen and the commission placed its 
operation in the hands of Chief Dullea, who has done 
a first rate job. 

Commissioners William P. Wobber and Ward Walkup 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October. 1943 



were then introduced as well as Sheriff Dan Murphy, 
whom Chief Dullea said had given as much to law en- 
forcement as any citizen in the state. 

President McAllister then delivered his annual message 
to the assemblage, a copy of which appears on another 
page. 

Appointment of committees were made (the member- 
ship of these will be found on another page) and the 
convention took a recess for luncheon in the Fairmont 
Hotel, given by the special agents of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation in this state and headed by Chief Special 
Agent Pieper, Richard Hood of Los Angeles, and John 
Wilson, San Diego. 

The Monday afternoon meeting started off with a 
speech by Governor Earl Warren, who has not missed 
a half dozen meetings of the Association since it was 
formed. 

Governor Warren opened his remarks by saying that 
he felt this was one spot where he could talk without 
preparing a speech, because of long association with the 
members he felt that he could talk as one of the boys. 

He declared his association with the peace officers as 
District Attorney of Alameda County and as Attorney 
General of the state had been the happiest years of his life. 

He sketched how the law and legislative committees of 
the Association had successfully worked for the enactment 
of many good laws for the people of this state and had 
stopped a lot of adverse legislation. 

He touched on the losses of personnel in the various 
policing organizations of the state, and said it was amazing 
the way these short staffed departments had carried on 
their grand work. But he said the losing of able officers 
was reaching a point where the bottom of the barrel was 
being reached. He said the selective service authorities 
had made concessions that were the best that could be 
obtained at this time, but he assured his intention to do 
all he could to see that every essential enforcement officer 
was retained in the important work of protecting life and 
property. 

He told of the formation of the War Council and how 
that body, formed through his efforts, was here to help 
peace officers and local agencies in their war duties. 

Respecting juvenile delinquency he said a lot of youths 
had been thrown off balance. Mothers are leaving homes 
and children to work in war plants, and the children were 
roaming around the streets with no one to supervise their 
actions. He said it was the duty of the peace officers to 
have a plan to handle the situation and prevent them 
conducting themselves in a manner that would destroy 
their future. 

He said the influx of people into California is greater 
than at any time since the Gold Rush, and many of them 
are going to remain here after the war, and we must see 
that they have no cause to regret this idea. 

He stated that the postwar era will see the greatest 
business revival California has ever seen. In the western 
states he said there were some ten or eleven million people 
and we have room and resources for 150,000,000. 



We have our own steel mills, aluminum, plastics and 
magnesium plants. This state, like the rest of the country, 
is going into light metal economy, he declared, and au- 
tomobiles that now weigh 2500 pounds or more will be 
replaced by those weighing 700 pounds, made up of these 
light metals. 

We must plan for the post-war future. 

He said he was just as interested in social conditions, 
of which the police officer is a factor, as he was as district 
attorney and as attorney general, as he found the peace 
officers all working for the betterment of government. 

Willard Keith, deputy director of the War Powers Act, 
substituted for his superior officer, Homer Buckley, in 
giving the law enforcement officers a resume of the history 
and the duties of the War Powers Act. He told of how 
the state was divided into zones and each zone provided 
with a head who was organizing all agencies into a formid- 
able force to operate in emergencies. 

Lt. Col. Kenneth H. Leitch, State Director of Selective 
Service, said in his address that he was mindful of the 
feeling that many of the heads of police departments 
present might have toward his agency. But before he had 
completed his address he convinced his audience that he 
was doing all he could to minimize the loss of personnel 
in law enforcement agencies. 

Chief E. Raymond Cato of the California Highway 
Patrol gave an interesting paper on "Police Responsibility 
in Highway Transportation." He used experiences of the 
California Highway Patrol as an example of the many 
changes the war has brought about. His speech will be 
published in a later issue of this journal. 

District Attorney Ralph Hoyt of Alameda County, a 
prime favorite with the members of the Association and 
being one of its most active workers in Civilian Defense 
matters and legislation, selected as his topic, "Mutual Aid 
Between Law Enforcement Agencies." 

The second day of the convention was opened with an 
invocation by Rev. John A. Collins, rector St. Peter's 
Episcopal Church. 

The first address on the morning's calendar was made 
by Attorney General Robert W. Kenny, who has during 
the years made many friends among the peace officers of 
the state. His subject was "Crime Prevention and Juvenile 
Delinquency." The latter part of his subject brought out 
one of the most earnest and constructive discussions of 
the entire convention. 

In regards delinquency among juveniles, General 
Kenny said that the present rise in this feature of our 
public life could not be solved by any single agency. He 
said that the matter is one that calls for intelligent han- 
dling by various agencies — the home, education, church, 
schools, police, juvenile court, and child protective so- 
cieties, and only by these agencies working in close har- 
mony can the problem be reduced to a minimum. He 
stressed the fact that recreational activities would be a 
major one in any program adopted. 

A panel of the following was appointed by President 
McAllister, to elaborate on the speech of General 
Kenny: Chief Ray Wallace, Fresno; Chief Dullea; Deputy 



October, 194 i 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page J 



Chief Riordan; J. J. OTarrell, Chief of the State Nar- 
Cotic Bureau; Captain Anderson, Los Angeles; Chief 
Neil Anderson, Pasadena; Chief Roland R. Hodgkinson, 
Newport Beach. 

Chief Dullea said the police had been pushed aside in 
the juvenile problem, and now that public opinion was 
being aroused the police departments are expected to step 
in and solve it. He laid some responsibility to the fact that 
li to 17-year-old boys and girls were being urged to work 
in defense plants with no provision for their supervision. 

Chief Hodgkinson said Newport Beach presents plenty 
of work for his beach city during the summer vacation. 
He said mothers and fathers are satisfied to shunt the care 
of their young ones to various organizations so that the 
parents can enjoy themselves. 

Chief OTarrell said that the parents could get the 
book thrown at them when children become a problem. 
He cited instances of juveniles his bureau has handled in- 
volving the use of young people in the illegal selling of 
narcotics. 

Chief Wallace said in Fresno he and his department 
have had great success in taking would-be incorrigibles 
and placing them in responsible positions of recreational 
centers. He maintains placing responsibility on the youths 
of the land is a mighty sound idea. 

Chief Anderson declared that the selection of the proper 
personnel was an important factor in handling juvenile 
delinquency, and he favored the younger persons for this 
work. 

Deputy Chief Riordan said that the war has brought 
on, as former wars have done, a misguided idea among 
young girls that they are rendering a patriotic service in 
giving themselves to the members of the armed forces. He 
said that young people are leaving the smaller communities 
for the larger, with no directing hand. He said that some 
agency should be created to take charge of these traveling 
minors, ascertain where they are going, what arrangements 
they have made for their arrival and what they are going 
to do. He said many people are making a mistake in not 
implanting a spiritual and moral doctrine into the minds 
of the juveniles. 

Chief Cato reviewed the actions of minors that have 
come under his California Highway Patrol officers. 

Chief Horrall of Los Angeles said his department has 
trained thousands of young boys as auxiliary police and 
these lads have done much to lessen juvenile delinquency. 
They have been responsible, particularly in supressing 
street gangs, and he says it is pleasing to see how quickly 
these boys grasp the idea of upholding law and order, 
when once they are guided in the proper manner. 

"The Soldier Under Civil Law" was the topic of Cap- 
tain Herbert E. Wenig, assistant Staff Judge Adjutant, 
Western Defense Command, 4th Army. His address ap- 
pears on another page. 

One of the outstanding speakers of the three-day session 
was Hugh H. Clegg, assistant director of the FBI, who 
came representing Director John Edgar Hoover. 

He told of the close relationship between his chief and 
the peace officers of California, stating that Director 



Hoover calls a majority of them by their first names. 

He stated that the peace officers of this nation have 
assisted the FBI in building up a fingerprint file of 75,- 
000,000 names. 

Director Clegg told his listeners that any peace officer 
in this state could have the service of any agent of the 
bureau, with the bureau paying all expenses. 

He stated that the peace officers of this nation are serv- 
ing on the home front, with no bands or bugles to spur 
them on, but they were doing one swell job, and their 
cooperation with the FBI was splendid. 

The police officers of today have reached the highest 
standard of service in the history of the country, he said, 
and through training are progressing in a manner little 
understood by the general public. 

As to juvenile delinquency, he maintained the police- 
man on the beat is the best authority to meet this problem, 
because he has the facts and figures on this subject. 

He gave an interesting account of the capture of a mob 
of subversive agents who were chased across the country 
by the FBI agents who had planted a bunch of blue prints 
on the boys. This gang was apprehended in San Francisco. 

"Venereal Disease Control Through Repression of 
Prostitution" was the subject of Edwin J. Cooley, re- 
gional supervisor Federal Security Agency. 

He stated that Chief Dullea has supported the program 
of the war authorities during the past two years in a 
whole-hearted manner and that the head of the San 
Francisco Police Department had never backslided in any 
manner. 

The houses of prostitution have been closed down 
throughout the nation by the police officials, assisted by 
the war officials. 

He said, through the program being carried on at the 
present time, that syphilis will be a minor disease at the 
end of 20 years, and gonorrhea will disappear in eight or 
ten years. 

Chief Horrall of Los Angeles, speaking on "Operating 
a Police Department with Limited Personnel," cited some 
interesting figures. He said his department of 3000 men 
had been reduced 20 per cent, 600 men having left to 
enter the various branches of the service. When the 
present list of eligibles is exhausted, he said the civil service 
commission will hold no more examinations for police 
officers, taking such competent men as can be obtained to 
service for the duration. He said, overall crime had de- 
creased in Los Angeles for this year over 1942, though 
robberies had increased materially. 

He stated that by arrangements with the sheriffs office 
the State Highway Patrol and the Los Angeles police, a 
program has been perfected to handle any rioting that 
might start in the county of Los Angeles. 

Chief Horrall stated that Los Angeles city now has 
a population of 1,738,000 in its 450 square miles of area 
and his police force with a reduction of 20 per cent 
is doing a fine job in suppressing crime and the appre- 
hending of criminals. 

Chief Cato, in his talk, said that the California High- 
( Continued on Page 21 ) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



October, 1943 



The Presidents Message 

Report made by Chief Alexander K. McAllister 
On Opening Day of State Peace Officers Convention ni the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco 



Upon assuming the office of President of this great 
Association of law enforcement agencies, in Los Angeles 
last year, I recognized that it constituted a high honor, 
and I felt then, as I most definitely feel now, the weight 
of the responsibility of being your president. Especially 




Chief Alexander K. McAllister 
Junior Past President 

at the present time, when our Nation is staking its life, 
and the lives of all of us, on a successful conclusion to 
the war. 

Never before has there been a greater need for unity, 
for calm appraisal of the forces which work against us, 
for coordination of thought and effort in providing an 
adequate defense, against the known, and the unknown 
hazards of present day life. Possibly never before has 
law enforcement occupied such an important place on 
the American scene as it does today. And yet, even now, 
added work and responsibility is in sight for all of us. 
The immediate future will be crowded with increased 
obligations. This additional importance will necessitate an 
intelligent and dispassionate approach to our greater re- 
sponsibilities. We are law enforcement officers. 
Civilian Defense 

One of the most pressing problems ever to confront 
Law Enforcement in California, was the possibility, in 
fact, the probability, of death and destruction from Jap- 
anese bombing planes, immediately after Pearl Harbor. 
Prior to those dark days, the police were charged with 
the protection of the lives and property of the people. 
Laws had been enacted and adequate precautions had 
been taken against all the known hazards of peace-time 



existence. Suddenly we were to realize that the precautions 
usually taken against the known dangers of life, were no 
longer sufficient to ward off the unknown dangers of 
modern warfare. The technique of dealing with disaster 
had to be changed suddenly and radically. Civilians by 
the thousand were recruited, organized, trained and 
equipped to assist the authorities with civilian protection. 
By practice and experience we have produced a machinery 
for civilian defense, in which the people of California 
have complete confidence and which can now, we believe, 
deal effectively even with the unexpected. 

However, since the highest military authorities on the 
Pacific Coast have recently reached the decision that civ- 
ilian defense in areas removed from the immediate coast, 
now can be relaxed, considerable speculation has been 
voiced as to the necessity of maintaining this important 
war-time service. Steps have already been taken by many 
inland communities to reduce these activities to the mini- 
mum consistent with the desires and recommendations of 
the army. The Director of Civilian Defense for the City 
of Sacramento has already tendered his resignation effec- 
tive October the first, together with a series of recom- 
mendations, looking towards a curtailment of civilian 
defense activities. His successor, the new Director of Civ- 
ilian Defense for Sacramento is a full time city employee. 

This arrangement is part of the City Administration's 
plan to reduce the expense of the defense organization 
by having more city employees carry on its activities. It is 
possible that other communities have taken, or will take 
similar action. How will this new situation affect the law 
enforcement profession? Will we now be relieved of our 
civilian defense responsibilities? apparently not; exactly 
the opposite seems to be in prospect. It seems to be the 
general impression that while a minimum set of require- 
ments have been advocated for certain regions in Cali- 
fornia, conditions might well arise at any moment which 
would call for prompt and effective action, and in order 
to be prepared for any disaster, the auxiliary police, fire 
and medical services should be maintained in full. No one 
advocates reducing the defense set-up beyond the bounds 
of prudence, but it is the general opinion, that civilian 
defense expenditures and personnel should be trimmed to 
the lowest point consistent with security, and that so far 
as possible the activities should be performed by regular 
city and county employees. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

War has always been the spur which speeds existing 
trends. One of the trends which the nation watches with 
considerable interest at present, is the reported increase in 
juvenile delinquency. We are told that delinquency has 
always increased during every war period. The war has 
of course changed the whole pattern of our children's 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



lives and disrupted established routines. 

Many reasons may be advanced to explain the present 
trend, basically of course, the trend in delinquency is due 
to the disruption of normal home life. Millions of men 
and women have been dislocated due to the war. Disci- 
pline has been upset by shortening of school terms to allow 
children to work on farms. The present delinquency status 
may be due in part to lack of family supervision, due to 
mothers holding down jobs in war production, and by the 
drafting of older brothers into the service. Thousands of 
young boys and girls have severed the home ties for the 
first time, either as members of the armed forces or because 
of being employed in strange cities. Many of these young- 
sters are undoubtedly taking advantage of their freedom 
to have a fling, without thought of the cost which may 
be involved. 

I think sometimes we adults are prone to believe that 
the rising generation is different from our generation. To 
what extent the facts will justify such an assumption is 
certainly debatable. Qualified authorities definitely agree 
that there is an increase in juvenile delinquency, and 
they just as definitely disagree as to the extent of the 
increase. * * * 

Whether valid and dependable statistics are available 
or not. Whatever the actual conditions throughout the 
country may be, the solution of the juvenile delinquency 
puzzle admittedly is difficult and the situation is suffi- 
ciently serious to merit the attention of the government 
and appropriate social agencies. * * * 

More serious even than the immediate circumstances is 
the post-war problem which present conditions may incu- 
bate. So whatever the actual situation may be, no matter 
what happens, we must all join in seeing that the children 
of today are trained to become good citizens of tomorrow. 

Prostitution 

It is gratifying to note that there has been no unpleasant 
insinuation of a lack of cooperation and unity between 
the local law enforcement agencies and the National Gov- 
ernment during the past year. The policy of the War 
Department has been the policy of law enforcement, sup- 
pression of prostitution as a venereal disease control is 
the official wartime policy of the Federal Government. 

The War and Navy Departments, the United States 
Public Health Service and other agencies, have joined 
in a vigorous campaign for the repression and prevention 
of prostitution. We, as law enforcement officers, have 
joined in this campaign and are exerting every effort to- 
wards the attainment of that goal. 

We are in complete accord with the attitude of the 
Federal Government that those large groups of young 
Americans now assembled in the service of their country, 
should be surrounded by every possible safeguard against 
unwholesome associations. We are all keenly interested in 
protecting the personnel of the armed forces from those 
undesirable and demoralizing influences, so detrimental 
to the health and welfare of those in military service. * * * 

Public Disorders 
We have had no special enforcement problem during 



the past year because of domestic difficulties or civil dis- 
turbances. California has been exceptionally fortunate in 
this respect. However, Section 4452 of the political code 
provides, that every Municipal Corporation shall be re- 
sponsible for injury to real or personal property situated 
within its corporate limits, done or caused by mobs or riots. 

We agree, of course, that all men are created equal, 
but we are forced to admit that they don't all develop 
equal abilities or tendencies. Consequently there are al- 
ways great masses of people who need to be restrained 
and controlled. So we do have to recognize, and we do 
recognize that the preservation of the public peace is 
dependent upon a strong and capable executive branch of 
government. We are all thoroughly familiar with the 
working theory of a democracy, which is simply the 
proposition that insofar as it is possible to do so, all of 
the governmental functions which affect most directly the 
daily lives of the people, shall be left exclusively within 
the control of the local municipalities, annd hence, within 
the control of men who are close to the people, and 
within easy reach of the people. However, when local 
municipal government proves insufficient it is the func- 
tion of the state government to preserve order within 
the State and to protect life and property. 

Plans are being considered at the present time, de- 
signed as a permanent program, to permit any community 
experiencing any sort of disorder or disaster, to first 
utilize all available local facilities and when these are 
exhausted to call upon the State authorities for help. 

There is no excuse for violence or direct action in 
the United States. The hand of constituted authority 
must be upheld by every citizen. No matter what the 
excuse may be, there is but one authority that has any 
right to lay hands on person or property, and that is 
the government. Government of the people, by the peo- 
ple and for the people. 

Militant minorities who resort to force must be met by 
force. There is no other policy for government to pursue. 
To permit individuals and minorities to obstruct a ma- 
jority program, is simply to invite confusion. Uprisings 
of domestic violence can do more to undermine public 
morale than squadrons of enemy bombers. In such times 
a community must depend upon its law enforcement 
agencies to preserve order. Where law enforcement is 
weak it should be strengthened by every means possible. 
We must always be prepared to meet with adequate 
measures situations which menace the peace and security 
of the State. 

Manpower 
No matter where one may look these days, if is clearly 
evident that the manpower problem becomes increasingly 
complex. We find that the newspapers and magazines 
are devoting columns and pages to a discussion of this 
subject. The radio is continuously bringing us elaborate 
diagnosis by learned experts attempting to describe what 
is wrong with manpower allocation. No master plan has 
yet been developed, however, which has offered a solution 

(Continued on Page 25) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 1943 



AUXILIARY POLICE REVIEW 



The second annual review of the San Francisco Police 
was a most auspicious event, with something like 2500 
volunteer citizens who have spent many months in this 
necessary activity of civilian defense, and taken over much 
work from the regular policemen. 




Captain Michael Riordan 
Deputy Chief of Police 

This organization, which has been under the direction 
of Deputy Chief Michael Riordan, and perfected into one 
of the best trained units of San Francisco's Civilian De- 
fense, made a fine showing. 

Led hy their bugle and drum corps and regular police 
officers, the parade of the Auxiliary Police marched before 
a reviewing stand in front of the city hall, where Mayor 
Angelo J. Rossi, Police Commissioners Walter McGovern, 
William P. Wobber and Ward Walkup, General Walter 
J. Watson and many other civic officials were stationed to 
witness the spectacle. 

General Watson made a stirring address to the Auxili- 
ary Police, as did Mayor Rossi. 

Awards were made for the various individuals and 
units of the organization for exceptional service, the de- 
cision of the winners being made by Dan Danziger, Alfred 
H. Meyers and Ralph J. A. Stern. 

The San Francisco Chronicle trophy for the most ef- 
ficient company was awarded to Company I (Taraval) . 
1st Lieutenant Charles A. Forbes received the trophy on 
behalf of his company. 

The Mayor Angelo J. Rossi trophy for the most ef- 
ficient drill unit was awarded to Company H (Ingleside). 
1st Lieutenant Elmo Simmons received the trophy. 

The Leon L. Roos trophy for the runner-up in drill 
competition was awarded to Company I (Taraval). 2nd 



Lieutenant Emil Nelson was designated to receive the 
trophy. 

The Walter McGovern (President of the Police Com- 
mission) trophy for the most efficient lieutenant was 
awarded to 1st Lieutenant Richard R. Farrell of Com- 
pany J (Potrero). 

The Walter E. McGuire trophy for the most efficient 
sergeant was awarded Sergeat John Butler of Company 
H (Ingleside). 

The Judge William Traverso trophy for the most ef- 
ficient corporal or lance corporal was awarded to Corporal 
Kenneth Adams of Company I (Taraval) . 

The San Francisco Police Officers' Association prize — 

$50 war bond — was awarded to Auxiliary Patrolman 
Lawrence Posey of Company D (Mission) . 

TRAFFIC 
The Fashion Clothing Company trophy was awarded 
to 1st Lieutenant Fred C. Erbacher of Company K as 
being the most efficient lieutenant in traffic work. 

EFFICIENCY IN SPECIALIZED GROUPS 

The Hibernia Bank Trophy was awarded to 1st Lieu- 
tenant Patrick O'Donnell of the Zoo unit. 

The William M. Mulpeters trophy was awarded to 
Auxiliary Sergeant Merle Putnam of the Zoo unit. 

The George K. Whitney trophy was awarded to 
Auxiliary Corporal Louis Fitting, of the Zoo unit. 

The Oliver M. Rousseau trophy was awarded to 
Auxiliary Patrolman Lloyd Lawrence of the Motorcycle 
unit. 

ENROLLMENT RECRUITING 

The Judges have recommended that, insofar as recruit- 
ing is concerned, the zones be disregarded and that the 
three trophies authorized be given to the three men of the 
highest standing in the field of recruiting. 

The following awards were made : 

The William P. Baker (Regal Amber Company) 
trophy was awarded to Auxiliary Corporal Kenneth 
Adams of Company I (Taraval), who has the highest 
number of enrollments to his credit. 

The Alfred H. Meyer trophy was awarded to 
Auxiliary Corporal Francis Wysock of Company I (Tara- 
val) , who has the second highest number of enrollments. 

The Granat Bros, trophy was awarded to Staff Ser- 
geant Sidney Tiers of Company F (Park), who has the 
third highest number of enrollments. 

REVOLVER COMPETITON BY COMPANIES 

The team from Company H (Ingleside) won the first 
prize with an aggregate score of 724. This team was com- 
posed of the following named men: Patrolman Robert A. 
Fortini, Lance Corporal Page P. Corner, Lance Corporal 

(Continued on Page 28,) 



October, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Guard Against "The Meanest Thief" 

Because the number of Government checks being issued and due to the necessary investigation and routine of issu- 
to the members of the families of the men now in our ing a duplicate check, the United States Secret Service has 
Armed Forces, the problem of stealing, forging and requested that everyone join in a nation-wide campaign 
uttering these checks has increased. When an Allotment of education designed to protect payees and merchants 
or an Allowance check is stolen from the family of one against this meanest of all thieves. 

When cashing checks for others, the Secret Service 



suggests these four points: 

1. Know your endorsers. 

2. Before cashing a Government check for a stranger, 
ask yourself this question — "If the bank returns this 
check as a forgery, can I find the forger and recover 
my loss?" 

3. Have all checks initialled by the employee who cashes 
them. 

4. Insist upon having all checks endorsed in your 
presence. 

PROTECT THAT CHECK 

If an allotment or allowance check is received 
from the Government, the Secret Service urges 
that these simple suggestions be followed: 

1. Never endorse a check until you are actually 
in the presence of the person who will cash it. 

2. Be sure your mailbox is locked. 

3. Whenever possible, arrange with your mail 
carrier to deliver all checks in person rather 
than to the box. 

4. See that your name is printed plainly on your 
mailbox. 

5. If you change your address notify the postal 
authorities immediately. 

6. Cash your checks in the same place each 
month. 

7. Cash your checks yourself. Don't send small 
children to the store with it. Such a practice 
encourages juvenile delinquency and already 
one Federal Judge has sentenced a merchant 
for cashing a Government check for a child, 
obviously not the payee. 




Thomas B. Foster 
Chief U. S. Secret Service in San Francisco 

of the men who are in the Armed .Forces, in most cases 
it causes a great deal of distress because of the length of 
time before a duplicate can be issued. 

In connection with the increased number of forgeries 
of Government checks the United States Secret Service 
has inaugurated a campaign which is termed "KNOW 
YOUR ENDORSER — REQUIRE IDENTIFICA- 
TION" when cashing Government checks. The Agents 
of the United States Secret Service are making every 
effort to educate the persons who receive Government 
checks in the protection of same and also those who cash 
Government checks and other types of checks as to the 
necessity of requiring proper identification. 

The following article was forwarded to this Journal by 
Thomas B. Foster, supervising Agent for this district for 
the U. S. Secret Service, and it is well worth peace of- 
ficers of all localities to have it placed in a conspicuous 
place in police and law enforcement headquarters: 

Twelve million checks a month are being mailed by the 
United States Treasury Department. They are going prin- 
cipally to dependents of men in the armed forces — to the 
wives and mothers of men who are giving their all in the 
barren wastes of the Artie, in the far reaches of the Pa- 
cific, in the unbearable heat of the desert — that American 
ideals may not perish from the earth. 

"That anyone would stoop to the level of pilfering 
these checks from mailboxes is well nigh unbelievable, yet 
true," the Treasury says. 

Because of the hardships occasioned by such thievery, 



POLICE COLOR GUARD AT 
THE CONVENTION 

The members of the San Francisco Drum Corps who 
participated in the colorful ceremonies on the opening day 
of the war conference of the State Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation and who presented the colors on this occasion were : 

Inspector Percy Keneally, Officers James Mahoney, 
Arthur Barrett and Bert Nelson. 

Phone BErkeley 7300 Wallace H. Miller, Mana K in K Owner 

HOTEL SHATTUCK 

SHATTUCK AVENUE AT ALLSTON WAY BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



October, 194: 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief John A. Greening, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



One of the largest attended meetings of the Bay Coun- 
ties Peace Officers' Association was held September 30, 
on Treasure Island. The host of this meeting was Com- 
mander H. M. McKinley, District Shore Patrol Officer, 
and former San Francisco civil service commissioner, and 
who lately became a member of the Association. 




Sheriff Daniel Murphy 
Presided at Treasure Island Meeting 

With the accustomed Navy perfection, nothing was left 
undone that might contribute to the enjoyment of the 
visitors. 

Buses were provided to take the Association members 
and their guests over the island, and these saw that the 
Navy has preserved the lawns and flower gardens so beau- 
tiful during the two expositions held there when the 
island was completed and which commemorated the com- 
pletion of the two great bridges of this area. 

Following the bus ride, all were taken to the auditorium, 
where an impressive and revealing motion picture of the 
destruction of a fleet of Japanese war ships and supply 
vessels, totaling over 20, was shown. 

Then the visitors were in turn taken to the swimming 
pool where the Navy gave a demonstration of the training 
of its personnel in boarding and leaving ships and the use 
of life saving devices; then to the gymnasium, where an 
exhibition of judo was presented that showed how the 
recruits are taught how to play for keeps with any ad- 
versary. Then the visitors saw how the boys are given fur- 



ther training on the obstacle course, and believe me you 
when a gent can negotiate that course he has completed 
something that's going to come in mighty handy when the 
occasion in warfare presents. 

Then the 200 or more present were taken through the 
dining room, the kitchen and bake shop, where they saw 
how the food, so necessarily of the best, is prepared for 
the men who are destined to man the ships of our Navy. 
It was a pleasing sight and one that gave all present a 
feeling that our boys are being well taken care of, for 
there were many members who have sons in that branch of 
the armed forces. 

The visitors were then marched to the officers' mess 
hall and sat down to a luncheon, the piece de resistance 
being a T-bone steak, something a lot of them had not 
seen since the rationing of meat. 

After the luncheon, Vice President Sheriff Dan 
Murphy took over, because President John Greening, 
Chief of Police of Berkeley, was unable to attend owing 
to the illness of his wife. 

After calling the meeting to order, he presented Com- 
mander Howard McKinley, and recounted that this gen- 
tleman was a San Franciscan engaged in the important 
work of security officer, and had taken a lot of peace 
officers and put them to work on the Shore Patrol of the 
Navy. 

Commander McKinley, after presenting many of the 
navy officers present, including former Chief William J. 
Quinn, who was active in making the visit one of enjoy- 
ment and who was one of the organizers and the first presi- 
dent of the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association, he 
stated he was glad to have the members his guests. 

He presented Admiral Greenslade, commanding the 
naval activities in this area, the speaker of the day. 

Admiral Greenslade, after paying a tribute to former 
Chief Quinn for his work as a member of the Navy, pre- 
sented his address, which is to be found on another page. 

President Greening sent a communication to the meet- 
ing stating that the Association had been given assurance 
by the State Prison Directors that photographs of prisoners 
of the penal institutions would be continued and not 
abolished as had previously been stated. 

There will be no meeting of the Association in Novem- 
ber, and the next session will be on December 9, when 
Warden Clinton Duffy will be host at San Quentin 
prison. This will also be a banner meeting. 

Among those who signed cards at the Treasure Island 
Luncheon were: 

San Francisco — Captain of Inspector Bernard Mc- 



October, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Donald; Captain John Engler; Commander H. M. Mc- 
Kinley, Chief Morale Officer; Lieutenant J. Dwight 
O'Dell, Commanding Officer District Train Patrol; Major 
George R. Eckmann, military Intelligence U. S. Army; 
Captain William R. Morrison; Chief Joe O'Farrel, State 
Bureau of Narcotics; Paul Watson and Earl J. Smith, U. 
S. Customs service; Sheriff Dan Murphy; Undersheriff 
William V. Hollingbery; Rev. Norman Feeley; Douglas 




Commander H. M. McKinley 
Host at Treasure Island Bay Counties Association Meeting 

Hayden, Chief Special Agent Telephone Co.; J. D. Sul- 
livan, special agent FBI; Wm. E. Schoppe and Jimmie 
Britt, National Auto Theft Bureau; Lieutenant James 
English, Assistant Director Civilian Defense; Chief J. L. 
Creighton, Standard Oil Co.; John McKeon, Director 
Civilian Defense; Jess Hesson, Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral; Chief Special Agent J. H. McClelland, Attorney 
General office; Donald Galbraith, Special Agent, Stand- 
ard Oil Co.; Assistant District Attorney William P. 
Golden; Opie L. Warner; F. H. Gardner, Supervising 
Customs Agent; City Engineer Jack Casey; Inspector 
George H. Austin, Postal Service; Milton Pilhashy; Dr. 
Leo McMahon; Robert H. Morse; Fireman Fred Murphy; 
Frank H. Tharp, manager Burns Detective Agency; E. J. 
Ehmann, superintendent Pinkertons; John J. Burke, re- 
tired Postal Inspector; Major James G. Helmer and Lieu- 
tenant J. O. Heine, 749th M. P. Battalion; Major Harry 
E. Amey, Port Provost Marshall; Major Chester Gracie; 
Captain Lewis H. Keyes, M. P.; Lieutenant Arthur J. 
Maserman, U.S.N.R.; Lieutenant Wesley Compton, Coast 
Guard Intelligence office; Lieutenant Elmer F. Garrigan, 
U.S.C.G.R.; Captain Paul Cronk; Lieutenant Colonel 
Edward F. Penaar, Provost Marshall; Lieutenant C. J. 
Gallivon, U. S. Coast Guard; Lieutenant R. H. Hibbard; 
Lieutenant Commander William J. Quinn; Lieutenant 
Colonel Eric A. Lotz; Lieutenant Commander George H. 
Cabaniss, Jr.; Lieutenant Harley Carswell, U.S.N.R.; 
Lieutenant Marvin F. Pratt; Lieutenant Commander John 
J. McMahon; Lieutenant L. B. Johnson; Major A. L. 



Tucker; A. J. Kane, manager Kane Detective Agency; 
Albert S. Wirtner; Major Ed C. Wood, Chief Special 
Agent Pacific Gas fe? Electric Co.; Phil E. Geauque, U. 
S. Secret Service; Joseph A. Murphy, chairman advisory 
board Civilian Defense; A. Helgoe, American Hawaiian 
Steamship Co.; R. W. Armstrong, Narcotic Bureau; R. 
E. Meyer, special agent FBI; George Griffin, special agent 
Attorney General; J. E. Meinboess; Homer F. Potter; Fred 
Murphy, Fire Department; Arthur E. Duane, American 
Trust Co.; E. T. McClanahan, Vice-President Standard 
Oil Co.; Jack Helms, State Civilian Defense; Carl Wol- 
bach; Commander Martin E. Carlson; W. E. Purcell, 
boatswain; John Misterly, Narcotic Bureau; William A. 
Merrill, agent in charge U. S. Secret Service; M. E. 
Colim; Chief Don Marshall, State Board of Education. 

Oakland — Chief Robert P. Tracy and Former Chief 
James Drew; Sheriff N. P. Gleason; Leon N. Ader, un- 
dersheriff; Charles R. Schwanenberg city manager; Mayor 
Dr. John F. Slavich; Captain of Police F. R. Barbeau; 
Wm. F. Murray; Officer William H. Stanton; Ralph E. 
Hoyt, district attorney; Major S. Badger, assistant Port 
Provost; Fire Marshall Fred Carlson; Captain Gerald R. 
O'Melveny, C. M. P.; Lieutenant Andy M. Welliver, 
former chief of police, Reno; Lex Jensen, division chief. 
Sheriff's office; Deputy Sheriff Douglass Webb; Henry M. 
Joyner; W. A. Wallace; Inspector Andrew J. Ford, 
C. H. P. 

Albany — Chief S. C. Williams, Police Commissioner B. 
W. Mowday, Officer Frank Al Regello, William Hydie, 
R. L. Turley, and J. W. Newhauser. 

Burlingame — Police Commissions Peter Dahl and Allan 
Hunt, Councilman I. J. Rotti, Chief John J. Harper. 

Larkspur — Judge John R. Flor, Chief W. V. Nicholson, 
Deputy Chief Howard Clark. 

San Anselmo — Chief Donald T. Wood, Police Com- 
missioner Arthur W. Smith. 

San Rafael— Sheriff Walter B. Sellmer; Chief of Police 
Frank Kelly; Councilman W. C. Herup; City Clerk Eu- 
gene W. Smith; Harold W. Elliott, liquor control officer; 
Auditor W. B. Wraget. 

Vallejo — Chief Earl Dierking, Inspector Harry Olicer, 
and Police Commissioner Andrew Sheveland. 

Berkeley — Captain Walter Johnson, Inspector A. L. 
Coffey, Officer A. E. Riedel, Julian Thomas. 

Emeryville — Mayor A. J. Lacoste, Councilman Edward 
J. Carey, Chief L. H. Mann, Assistant Chief Frank 
Farina. 

San Mateo — Mayor Claude J. Hireschey, Supervisor 
Fred E. Beer, Chief F. Burke, City Treasurer C. A. Gin- 
never, J. P. Britt, Inspector Robt. O'Brien. 

Sausalito — Mayor Webb H. Mahaffy; Chief James F. 
Doyle; Captain of Police Cornelius J. McCann; Officer 
Fred Perry; Rudy Peterson; W. B. York, Marinship; W. 
A. Snare, plant protection, Marinship; Yates Hammett. 

Los Gatos — Acting Chief of Police Ralph Phillips, Con- 
stable E. O. Woods, Deputy Constable Robert Robinson, 
Councilman Bert Fresher, and Marc Vertin. 

South San Francisco — Judge L. G. Hardy, Chief Louis 
(Continued on Page 2i ) 



Page 12 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

The Navy and the Police 

Address by Vice Admiral John W. Greenslade, Commandant 15th T<[aval District, made to the 
Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association, Treasure Island 



October, 1943 



It is a pleasure for me to appear before you to speak of 
same of our mutual problems and to join with members of 
my staff as your hosts of the day. 

We are glad you have had an opportunity to see for 
youselves some of the work accomplished here on Treasure 




Vice Admiral John W. Greenslade 

Principal Speaker at Bay Counties Peace Officers' 

Meeting on Treasure Island 

Island, which I might say is only in its infancy as a perma- 
nent naval base, a goal long sought by many of you present 
here today. 

Nearly 1 5 years ago the Navy had concluded that 
Yerba Buena shoals, on which this naval base now stands, 
would make an ideal site for the necessary expansion of 
the naval establishment in San Francisco. I need not 
elaborate, however, on the public mind of those years. For 
the most part the public was satisfied to remain in an aura 
of isolationism. Few could visualize the dangers ahead in 
the Pacific. Yes ... it was difficult even for the Navy to 
secure funds for needed repairs and development of 
existing facilities, let alone an appropriation for anything 
so intangible as another naval base. Most of us know that 
only now are we approaching the cure of that disease 
known as "too little, too late." 

So it was that it took the immediacy of the Golden 



Gate International Exposition to create the site, subject to 
the approval of the War and Navy Departments. Our 
liaison officers assisted in the planning for and carrying 
out of the Exposition. Even as the Exposition reached its 
closing days the national emergency was growing. Within 
a few weeks, late in 1940, the Navy took over with the 
creation of the San Francisco Section Base. 

That was only a beginning. Private contractors were 
called in to carry out our plan. As you have seen today, 
every permanent and semi-permanent building of the Ex- 
position has been converted and modernized to reach full 
utility. In addition, more than 50 new structures have 
been completed and put to use. Still more have been con- 
templated. The grounds, as ycu can see, have been main- 
tained in beauty under the watchful eye of your fellow 
Californian, Rear Admiral Hugo Osterhaus. 

To sum it up, Treasure Island, in its present state, repre- 
sents the beginning of a mcdern, permanent naval activity; 
a unit of the principal fleet base of the Pacific Coast. Cer- 
tainly during this war, the San Francisco Bay area will 
remain the principal point of embarkation and logistic 
support to the west. 

I cannot visualize a minimization of naval power after 
this war such as occurred in the early 20's. The problems 
of the Pacific are ours on a vast scale. If San Francisco Bay 
was a great seaport in the past, the future has no known 
bounds, not only for our naval power, but for the vastly 
expanded merchant marine, our own and that of our allied 
neighbors as well. . . . 

Many of you have been working with us closely and are 
keenly aware of the needs of both the Navy and the Army 
and have extended your aid from time to time. 

In coming here today I have a rather kindred feeling 
toward you and your work. You are responsible for the 
good conduct of the million and a half civilians in your 
localities. You have trained and developed highly skilled 
forces of men to assist you in this task. 

I, in turn, am responsible for the discipline and good 
order of tens of thousands of Navy men, many away from 
home for the first time about to go west and others re- 
turning from the war areas, looking for a royal welcome 
and perhaps a bit of relaxation. The Navy, in close 
cooperation with the Army, has been compelled by neces- 
sity to expand its disciplinary forces. 

Actually, as Commandant of the Twelfth Naval Dis- 
trict, I have one of the four largest police organizations in 
the San Francisco Bay Area, a permanent force which now 
approaches 300 men and will, by January 1, 1944, reach 
the allowed compliment of 400 men, as established by the 
Bureau of Naval Personnel. These men are known as 
Specialists (S), denoting that they have been trained by 
you, the acknowledged leaders of the police organizations 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



of this area. An additional 400 to 500 men are supplied 
from stations and ships for temporary duty each day. 

Now I am well aware that some of the police depart- 
ments of the area have felt keenly the loss of vital man- 
power. I can understand your problems, with my personal 
knowledge of the vast influx of labor, military and naval 
personnel, with their families, into this area. You have 
faced constantly-increasing responsibility with each suc- 
ceeding month of the war. 

Thus it is with a full sense of your problems that I am 
able to say at this time that not a single peace officer who 
has entered the Navy from your organization has been lost 
to the over-all maintenance of law and order in the area 
of the bay counties. 

Our police specialists are stationed all around the Bay 
Area and Santa Cruz. We have also a highly skilled group 
working on all the principal trains arriving in and depart- 
ing from the Bay Area terminals. This service was ordered 
by the Bureau of Naval Personnel at the request of public 
carriers. 

In their duties, our shore patrolmen are working in 
close coordination with the Military Police with the dual 
purpose of improving and maintaining service personnel 
order and discipline and thereby relieving the pressure 
which would fall upon civilian police organizations. We 
are happy to know that this goal is being attained. 

I would like to cite certain additional features of our 
efforts in maintaining the peace of this area. 

Upon the recommendation of our District Shore Patrol 
Officer, the Twelfth Naval District has received approval 
for a $50,000 detention center adjoining the San Francisco 
Hall of Justice in Merchant Street. Work is now under 
way on this important addition to the naval establishment. 
Plans are in progress for a similar though smaller structure 
for the Oakland and East Bay area. These are not to be 
classed as jails in the ordinary sense, but are to serve as 
clearing centers for disciplinary cases ... to speed up the 
return of men to their ships and stations . . . and above all 
to provide places to keep such cases off the streets and out 
of civilian observation. . . . 

Another important program is that of the Army-Navy 
Joint Vice Control Board, which serves to coordinate the 
relationships between all branches of military service, fed- 
eral, state and local law enforcement agencies and the 
liquor licenses, as well as to maintain a constant check and 
balance against the spread of venereal disease. While not 
perfect, I feel that the work of this joint board has done 
much to protect the "square licensee" from the bad effects 
of the lawless, greedy and uncooperative operator. The 
officers serving on this board, most of whom are members 
of this association, have taken a common-sense approach 
to each individual case as well as to the general problem 
itself. 

While on this subject I might say that most of my ad- 
visors and staff members concerned with morale, welfare 
and shore patrol have been northern California men, who 
not only had the Navy's interests at heart, but were 
thinking along the lines of action best suited to local con- 
ditions. This I am informed was true also to a large extent 



with the Army, so that General DeWitt, General Wilson 
and myself had the advantage of contact at all times with 
men conversant with your problems. . . . 

It is the Navy's purpose to cooperate with the local 
courts in the proper disposition of cases which from time 
to time come before them. There have been some misun- 
derstandings over jurisdictions and furnishing of witnesses, 
but those have been few, and in all instances it has been 
my desire to avoid unnecessary publicity and special action 
or consideration simply because cases involved men in 
uniform. 

We of the Navy, and I think I can speak for the other 
branches of the armed forces, do not want to witness the 
growth of license and excess simply because a man wears a 
uniform. Instead, we want that uniform to be a badge of 
lawful conduct and good discipline. We want the men 
who wear it to deserve the rightful admiration of those on 
the heme front, so that, when this war is won, to have 
worn the uniform of our country may reflect the full 
degree of meaning we would attach to it. 



JUDGE TWAIN MICHELSEN 

Judge Michelsen's eight years on the Bench has estab- 
lished a record of which all San Franciscans are proud. 

This jurist has proven a fearless enemy of organized 
vice — particularly the illicit narcotic traffic. Delinquency, 
leading to crime, has been notably curbed in his court 
through his untiring study of crime causes and their pre- 
vention and cure. Rehabilitation of the weak, not perse- 
cution, is his practice. 

In addition to judicial activities, Judge Michelsen has 
become a powerful individual figure in the promotion of 
public safety, and has for several years been a leader of the 
California Safety Council. 

He is backed by an unsurpassed personal character and 
individual record. He has the outspoken advocacy of labor, 
religious groups and business organizations — an all- 
people's official. 



THANKS FROM THE ARCHBISHOP 

The following letter was received by Chief Charles W. 
Dullea: 

"I wish to express to you and through you, to all the 
members of the Department of the San Francisco Police, 
my sincere and heartfelt thanks for your police protection 
at Kezar Stadium, Sunday, September 12th, on the occa- 
sion of the Solemn Procession of the Blessed Sacrament. 
The efficiency and the courtesy of the men of your depart- 
ment made this religious celebration not only safe, but 
most respectful. I wish to thank particularly, through 
you, Captain Michael Mitchell and the other officers who 
acted as my personal escort. Praying every blessing upon 
you and all the members of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, I am 

Faithfully yours, 

JOHN J. MITTY, 
Archbishop of San Francisco." 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 1943 



The Soldier Under Civil Law 

By Captain Herbert E. Wenig, Assistant Staff Judge Advocate, Western Defense Command. 



Under our American system, officers and men of the 
Army, equally with all other citizens, are bound to obey 
the civil law. Violation of the State criminal law becomes 
a breach of the military code and subjects the soldier 
to trial, both in the State courts and by court-martial. In 
time of peace, the civil authorities have full power to try 
and punish soldiers whenever they so desire. However, in 
time of war, the necessities of carrying the war to a sue- 
cessful conclusion in the shortest possible time, make it 
necessary for the military authorities to have the para- 
mount right to the custody of soldiers who have offended 
State criminal law. 

The maintenance of our armed forces at their maximum 
strength, the need for continuing the training of the 
soldier, the efficient administration of the military estab- 
lishment, indicates that the military authorities should try, 
by their own courts, all military personnel who violate 
civil criminal law. This is the essence of the policy recently 
restated by the War Department. Trials by court-martial 
are prompt. The soldier is not whitewashed. In most cases 
the sentences are more severe than those which would be 
received in civil courts. The accused remains in military 
custody and under military control. The detention and 
trials by State Civil authorities of soldiers on active duty 
should be reduced to the minimum and resorted to only 
when the circumstances of the particular case make it 
imperative, or when such action is requested by the mili- 
tary authorities. The War Department, through the 
Commanding General, Ninth Service Command, is seek- 
ing to obtain statements of policy from the law enforce- 
ment authorities of the States within the Western Defense 
Command which will embody these principles. The basis 
for such a statewide policy is found in the agreements 
now in operation with the police of San Francisco and 
Los Angeles and with the California Highway Patrol. 

The War Department is making a determined and 
well-planned effort to salvage manpower for the continued 
use of the Army from among those soldiers who have 
been dishonorably discharged and are undergoing ex- 
tended periods of confinement. This work is being done 
at Rehabilitation Centers, established throughout the coun- 
try, where military prisoners are given military training 
while they are serving sentences. At these Centers, en- 
deavor is made to determine the reasons for the criminal 
acts of the individual soldier. A soldier, who by his con- 
duct, shows that he can be of service, may have his dis- 
honorable discharge removed, the remainder of his sentence 
suspended and returned to take his place in the ranks with 
his fellow soldiers to fight in the common cause. 

As the offensive against Japan gradually mounts in 
the months to come, the number of men located in Cali- 
fornia and going to or returning from the Pacific battle- 
fronts will increase, and so correspondingly will the prob- 
lem of civil crimes committed by our soldiers. The splen- 



did cooperation of the Peace Officers with the military 
authorities will continue to solve the problem. The work 
of California's Peace Officers has been and will continue 
to be a valuable contribution to the war effort. 



THE ANNUAL BANQUET OF THE 
STATE PEACE OFFICERS' ASSO. 

The main social event of the California Peace Officers' 
Association each year is the annual banquet. This event 
at the Second War Conference was held on the evening of 
October 12, in the spacious banquet hall of the Fairmont 
Hotel. As in past dinners, the women folks of the dele- 
gates attended, and there was a crowd present that taxed 
the capacity of the hall. 

Superior Judge Timothy I. Fitzpatrick was toastmaster 
and he did a mighty swell job. At the head table were the 
officers of the Association with their wives, Mayor Angelo 
J. Rossi and wife, Police Commissioners Walter Mc- 
Govern, William P. Wobber and Ward G. Walker, ac- 
companied by their respective wives, Administrator and 
Mrs. Thomas Brooks, Rt. Rev. Harold C. Collins, and 
Chief and Mrs. Charles Dullea. 

The Rev. Collins asked the blessing for the assemblage, 
and, after presenting prominent peace officials and notable 
guests following a splendid dinner, a high class floor show 
was presented, with the old reliable Mike Lawley acting as 
master of ceremonies. 

With this feature of the program completed, Judge 
Fitzpatrick presented President McGovern of the Police 
Commission the speaker of the evening. The speaker, 
noted for his oratorial ability, was in fine form. He selected 
for his theme the life and history of Christopher Colum- 
bus, the anniversary of whose landing in America was 
being celebrated on this day. 

In a well-worded and with characteristic delivery, Presi- 
dent McGovern recounted the difficulties Columbus had 
in getting his projected tour financed so that he could 
prove to his people that the world was round not flat as 
so many of the populace held in those dark ages. 

It was a masterpiece full of historical interest and held 
the attention of the some three hundred guests who lis- 
tened to it. 

It might be said here that the Fairmont Hotel manage- 
ment went all out to see that this convention was a success, 
and they did not stint on the menu of this annual banquet, 
something unusual in these uncertain times of the matter 
of food for the tables. 

Phone EXbrook 1 185 

McKUNE METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

Engineers and Fabricators 
266 TEHAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page IS 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman J. Schwandt, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at Leaming- 
ton Hotel, 19th and Franklin, Oakland, October 14th. 
Host Chas. B. McMurphy, Sheriff's office of Alameda, 
arranged for the luncheon, which was very good. The 
steaks were really good. The luncheon was served at 12:25 
P.M.; and the meeting was called to order by President 
Geo. Burton at 1:10 P.M. 

Members and visitors were introduced, after which the 
minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved. 

McMurphy spoke on monitoring our own control sta- 
tion, but it was decided that we make no changes for the 
present. 

Winters reported that Sloan of FCC, San Francisco, 
suggested that we take up the matter of monitoring our 
own station directly with FCC at Washington, D. O, as 
we would receive the best cooperation there. 

Lewis and McMurphy reported on relays. 

Request from Olin S. Johnson of Susanville, Lassen 
County, for 1722 Key for station transmitter and 35100 
Key for 5 mobile units. It was suggested that 38380 Key 
be allotted. Motion by McMurphy, seconded by McKee. 
Carried. 

Request from Chief of Police W. R. Davena of Benicia 
for a clearance of 2422 Key for 2 5 -watt transmitter for 
station and a change from 35220 Key to 30980 Key for 
mobile units. Motion by Lewis, seconded by LeBouef, that 
the clearance be granted. Carried. 

John L. Hinkel, CHP, Oakland, requested member- 
ship. The Board of Directors okehed the request, and he 
was accepted. 

At 2:00 P.M. we were honored by Lieutenant H. W. 
Heiwinkel and Sergeant Lawrence Paul with two reels of 
motion pictures furnished by the Army from San Fran- 
cisco. The pictures were very interesting and were enjoyed 
by all. 

At 3:00 P.M. the president opened the meeting for 
technical discussion. Discussion was mainly about the area 
covered by repeaters. 

President Burton asked for the next meeting at Mar- 
tinez. Accepted. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3 :26 P.M. 

Members present were: G. K. Burton, Henri Kirby, Jim 
M. Ruys, Herbert Becker, Jim M. Lewis, Frank E. Win- 
ters, Edward Bertola, Merrill LeBoeuf, Ray Gada, E. H. 
McKee, Chas. H. Cross, Homer Jones, Elvin Feice, Her- 
man J. Schwandt, Chas. B. McMurphy, Lloyd F. Mc- 
Kinney, Henry Bogardus Manuel Trinta, John J. Hartnett, 



William V. Stancil, E. S. Naschke, Ivan Hudson, Geo. V. 
Tudhope, A. J. Silva, H. Winzenried. 

Visitors present were: W. V. Pflaum, Chief of Police, 
Piedmont, Calif.; Lieutenant H. W. Heiwinkel, Signal 
Corps, San Francisco; Sergeant Lawrence Paul, Signal 
Corps, San Francisco; Ben C. Hill, Superintendent Elec- 
trial Department, Oakland; A. J. Morganthal, Inspector 
of Police, Oakland; L. K. Billingsly, U. S. Navy. 



COMMITTEES OF CONVENTION 

Following are the committees appointed by President 
McAllister at the State Peace Officers' Second War 
Conference : 

Credential Committee — Chief Hodgkinson, chairman, 
Newport Beach; Sherman W. McDonald, Red River 
Lumber Co.; Sheriff A. A. Ross, Humboldt; Chief J. C. 
Gregory, Fullertoh; Chief C. H. Anderson, Beverly 
Hills; Agent Robert McCullough, Pacific Electric Co., 
Los Angeles; John C. Meinbress, retired Pinkerton agent; 
Chief E. J. Wheeler, San Carlos; Chief Louis Belloni; 
Chief William Maher. 

Auditing — Sheriff John Steckter, chairman; Chief Ed- 
ward Arington, Modesto; Chief J. C. Cutting, South 
Gate; Chief L. Emmett Jones, Richmond; Retired Chief 
George M. Sears, San Diego; Sheriff Grattan Hogin, 
Stanislaus; Chief E. G Gaddy, Turlock; Sheriff Dan Cox, 
Sacramento; Joseph Peralta, San Leandro. 

Resolutions — Chief Howard Zink, Palo Alto, chairman; 
Chief J. N. Black, San Jose; Robert B. Powers, Bakersfield; 
Assistant Administrator Joseph F. Reed, Los Angeles; 
Jesse Hession, Attorney General's office; Lieutenant Com- 
mander George Bereton; Chief John Greening, Berkeley; 
Chief V. B. Brown, Glendale; Sheriff Robert Ware, Im- 
perial; Deputy Chief Michael Riordan. 

Memorial — Chief Donald Wood, San Anselmo; Chief 
W. P. Hendrey; Former Chief James Davis, Los Angeles; 
Harry M. Peterson, Redondo; Chief J. M. Graves, Wat- 
sonville; Chief Harry W. Perry, Tulare; John Creighton, 
Standard Oil Co.; C. Harriman. 

Nominations — Otis Bohn, Chief Special Agent Cali- 
fornia Packing Corp., chairman; Chief Neil F. Anderson, 
Pasadena; Chief Robert E. Peters, Petaluma; Fred H. 
Moore; Chief Louis Mann, Emeryville; Chief O. C. Smith, 
Whittier; Chief Wm. Pflaum, Piedmont; Robert C. John- 
ston, Agent Standard Oil Co., Los Angeles; Cort Smith; 
Sheriff Alex Borges, Monterey; Chief Carl Vonn, El 
Monte; Chief Guy C. Welch; R. H. Hilp, retired Los 
Angeles Police Department. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 1 943 




5=2 PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 3. Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
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ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 , 



SUICIDES, AUTO DEATHS FALL, 

TROLLEY FATALITIES SOAR 

San Franciscans bear up better under the emotional 
stresses and anxieties of wartime than under the worries 
and discouragements of peacetime. 

Fewer commit suicide while the nation is at war; fewer 
drink themselves to death. 

There is virtually no change in the murder rate. 

Auto accident deaths have dropped under wartime driv- 
ing conditions — but streetcar fatalities have increased at 
a startling rate. 

These conclusions are implied in statistics made public 
this month by Coroner Kingston in his annual report of 
deaths from all causes. 

In the fiscal year ending June 30, 1939, the last year 
before World War II broke out, 220 persons killed them- 
selves in San Francisco. 

In the year ending last June 30, San Francisco suicides 
dropped to 133. The proportionate decrease is greater 
than the actual drop, since the city's population has grown. 

The coroner ascribed 28 of last year's deaths to alco- 
holism. In 1939-40, 42 San Franciscans died from al- 
coholism. 

Murders and homicides not classified increased statis- 
tically in four years from 24 to 32 — a rise without sig- 
nificance in view of the war-swollen population. 



Auto accident deaths have varied little in the last four 
years, the annual toll being 111, 97, 114 and 109. While 
newcomers have increased the number of motorists, many 
other factors effect driving conditions. 

But almost as many San Franciscans were killed in 
street car mishaps in the last year as were killed in all 
the preceding four years. Last year 33 so died. — San Fran- 
cisco T^ews. 



FIRST NEGRO POLICEMAN 

SWORN IN FOR S. F. DUTY 

William Glenn, 45, became the first Negro police officer 
ever employed by San Francisco this month. 

Sworn in without ceremony, Glenn was assigned by 
Police Chief Charles W. Dullea to northern station, 
which embraces the Negro residential part of former 
Jap town. 

Glenn was the only Negro on the list of police appli- 
cants. A native of Houston, Tex., he has lived here since 
1930. His most recent job was as a Navy civilian guard. 
He has had two years of experience as a special police 
officer at Los Angeles. 

He holds limited police tenure that will expire six 
months after the war's end. 



From a Petit Theft Report : 

"Some unknown person took one Wheele Barrel Rub- 
ber wheele on same from the street that was chained to the 
tool box." 

(Baseball has been blamed for typographical and other 
bulls, but there is no baseball now, so we must blame the 
above general mixup on the Bay Meadows. Keeping track 
of the daily doings of the nags is a mighty mental strain, 
and the shortage of rubber, the "Beer Barrel Polka," and 
the song about that Dublin girl driving a wheel barrow 
with "Cockles and Mussels, Alive, Alive AH" in it, mean 
nothing to a young man with his mind down in San Mateo 
County. Probably some of his picks act like his street that 
is chained to the tool box — and imagine they are tied to 
the starting gate ; or probably he believes with the late 
Andrew Carnegie that spelling and punctuation were 
invented by crafty people who wanted to make out they 
had brains.) 

Old Gentleman: "Officer, how many police officers in 
San Francisco?" 

Officer: "Something more than one thousand at the 
present time." 

Old Gentleman: "Now, when I lived down on Sixth 
Street, I saw plenty of police officers walking around, and 
I always liked to say hello to them. Now, I never see 
them." 

Officer: "Where do you live now?" 
Old Gentleman: "Out by McLaren Park." 
Officer: "Well, out there the officers are mounted." 
Old Gentleman : "Oh, I thought those uniformed fel- 
lows on horseback were U. S. cavalry men. I must say 
hello to them and talk about old times south of Market 
Street." 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



The Battle on the Home Front 

Address of ]. Edgar Hoover, Director, FBI, before Convention of the International Association of 

Chiefs of Police Detroit, August 9. 



(Continued from last month) 
In days such as these, there must, of course, be a tight- 
ening up on the release of information that would aid the 
enemy. Too much care cannot be exercised in discussing 
matters bearing upon the war effort. Rumors and idle 
gossip can serve no good. Loose talk can bring tragic 
consequences. 

It has always been the policy of the FBI to release to 




John Edgar Hoover 

the public such facts as are possible once an investigation 
has progressed to the point of arrests or convictions. But 
it never has been our policy to announce in advance what 
we are going to do. That would be harmful to the public 
interest. I commend that policy to all law enforcement. 

As the war effort intensifies, law enforcement must 
increasingly look to the loyal public for assistance. The 
splendid cooperation which the press has afforded every 
field of law enforcement has been most gratifying, and I 
cannot commend too highly the splendid performance of 
the hard-working members of the journalistic profession. 
No finer job has ever been done in the history of the 
American press than that which now is being performed. 
Our press representatives are making heroic efforts to 
separate facts from propaganda, the true from the false. 
Hard-working reporters and editors, and their associates 
of screen and radio, have given their best efforts and 
thoughts that the country might be informed without 
hysteria. Daily, they demonstrate their willingness and 
ability to help. But at the same time, headlines, broad- 
casts and movies will not win the war ; neither will they 
in themselves protect America from spies, saboteurs and 
enemy agents. They can help. But, first, law enforcement 
must do its job. 

Increasingly, "catching spies" has become the desire 
of many untrained and unequipped individuals. By being 



cautious and absolutely accurate in making public an- 
nouncements, law enforcement officials can offset those 
who would spout forth wild accusations which, when 
examined, would be found wanting in substance. 

The gauging of accomplishments in our work today 
by screaming headlines and dragnet arrests is impossible. 
Best results cannot be gauged by blatant statements, and 
the maintenance of our internal security is too sacred a 
trust to permit it to be used by psychopathic political 
hopefuls as a catapult to bold headlines. Countering the 
activities of the domestic enemies is effective only when 
they are under constant surveillance, their sources of 
information controlled and their communications super- 
vised. 

It should not be forgotten that our Nation has been 
formed of many races and nationalities. Professional 
law enforcement must not permit itself to be misled by 
emotion-guided or gossip-minded individuals to acts of 
nuisance and oppression against persons merely because 
of a foreign background. Let us be guided by facts and 
facts alone. The Nation need have no fear that profes- 
sional law enforcement will be moved by surges of per- 
sonal prejudice and selfish motives. 

In protecting America today, it will be well to con- 
tinue the preventive procedures we have followed since 
the emergency. When persons come under suspicion, we 
must consider every factor and bear in mind that no 
honest, law-abiding citizen will object to being ques- 
tioned. The imposter and those seeking to conceal iden- 
tities will, of course, loudly protest. 

The story behind the success of law enforcement thus 
far is one of farsighted preparedness and determined 
cooperative effort. For years the men of law enforcement 
and the FBI have worked hand in hand for the purpose 
of bettering the profession and of safeguarding our fellow 
men. Through our Identification Division, which now 
has over 50,000,000 sets of fingerprints on file, our 
Technical Laboratory, crime reporting facilities, National 
Police Academy and police training programs, we have 
blended our efforts to achieve our common goal. With the 
President's Directive of 1939, the FBI Law Enforcement 
Officers Mobilization Plan for National'Defense was in- 
augurated and 155,000 officers of the Nation were mobil- 
ized into a smoothly functioning unit. Almost overnight, 
men who had concentrated on criminal investigations and 
regular police duties turned full efforts to the investiga- 
tions of activities menacing our national security. While 
the dictators met in conferences to divide the spoils of 
war and decide on new aggressions, conferences of peace 
officers were held and continue to be held throughout 
the United States to maintain our internal security and 
to make the American Citizen safe in his home. 

Law enforcement always has been the first line of de- 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, 1943 



fense on the home front in emergencies. With this in 
mind in the fall of 1940, the FBI dispatched a mission 
to England to study police procedure under actual war- 
time conditions. Their observations proved conclusively 
that civilian defense work was another tremendous respon- 
sibility that organized law enforcement must shoulder in 
anticipation of that day when America may be the target 
of enemy bombers. I am happy to announce today that 
another mission has just returned from England after 
studying the more recent wartime experiences of the 
Police. Again, the results of the FBI studies will be made 
available to the Police of this country. 

The FBI Civilian Defense Courses for Police were 
instituted in October of 1941 throughout the country, 
designed to train American officers in the problems of 
home defense. In February of this year, a series of War 
Traffic Schools was inaugurated by the FBI. This covered 
all phases of traffic conditions that confront a nation at 
war in order that America would not suffer the tragic 
experiences of some European countries when disorganized 
traffic and panic-stricken pedestrians interfered with the 
movement of the armed forces and actually contributed 
to the downfall of some nations. A total of 438 Civilian 
Defense and Traffic Schools were held, attended by 
36,722 officers, representing over 7,000 law enforcement 
agencies in the land. 

I could not begin to thoroughly review, however, all 
that the profession has done during the emergency and 
particularly since war has been declared. Day after day, 
despite increased difficulties, we have struggled to keep 
abreast of our responsibilities. The majority of your de- 
partments have added auxiliary policemen to assist you 
in your manifold duties. A recent survey conducted by 
the FBI revealed that there are approximately 175 auxil- 
iary officers for every 100 regular police officers in the 
larger cities. New personnel necessitates additional and 
intensive training. The IACP and the FBI have worked 
together constantly to provide that training. 

In handling our wartime duties, we must never lose 
sight of our vast domestic problems. Crime is definitely 
on the increase. Enforcement alone is not the answer. 
Juvenile delinquency is mounting rapidly and, unless we 
all do our jobs better, we can expect another era of law- 
lessness such as swept the country after the last war. By 
constantly enlisting the intelligent aid of the citizens, 
we can build up a barrier against the lawless. But the 
greatest single thing we can do is to constantly emphasize 
prevention and in so doing the place of emphasis is in 
the home. 

The fundamental fact remains that the principal re- 
sponsibility of a law enforcement agency is to vigorously, 
fearlessly and courageously enforce the laws, to apprehend 
violators and turn them over to the prosecuting officials. 
Kidnapers and bank robbers were stopped when they 
could no longer act with impunity. The same methods will 
work in other fields as well. 

The wartime spirit of abandon should not cause people 
to assume a paternal, tolerant attitude toward criminals. 
The greatest crime of our age is tolerance of and com- 



Phone KEIlog 3-2434 

H. CHRISTENSEN'S GARAGE 

General Auto Repairing - Front End Aligning - Frame Work 
Brake Work - Brake Drums Turned 



3658 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



We're Waitin' T' Serve You 

PARIS LIQUOR STORE 

Fine Wines - Beer and Liquors 
708 I4TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Ph. TEmplebar I 880. I 86 I Automotive • Industrial • House Paints 

AIR EQUIPMENT &. SUPPLY CO. 

DeVilbiss Air Compressors 



3329 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 1 161 



E. M. Alexander, Proprietor 



HAWS PLATING WORKS 

Plating - Oxidizing - Electro Tin 
1808 HARMON STREET BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 0133 

BROWER PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

MULLEN BROS. 



40TH «c BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 4993 



Also Repairs and Alterations 



THE HIDE-AWAY 

Leather Coats - Gloves — Coats, Gloves Made from Your Deer Skins 
460 II TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



GALL FUNITURE MANUFACTURING CO. 



4001 SAN LEANDRO STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 0981 



Sales Department - C. D. Mooney 



California Syrup 8C Extract Co. 

(Incorporated) 



1299 5 5TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 3963 



E. Labarthe. Mgr. 



HOTEL ST. PAUL 

120 Modern Rooms - Comfort With Economy 
534 I2TH STREET at Clay OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 5330 



H. C. Sullivan 



PIONEER FABRICS CO. 

Automotive & Furniture Fabrics - Upholstering Supplies 
2428 WEBSTER STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 9116 



Mfrs. of Silver Thread Brand Sauerkraut 



KRUGER 8C SONS 

Pickles - Syrup - Tomato Products 
4053 EMERY STREET EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 4976 



Quality Supreme Chili Products 



GOLDEN WEST 

Special Italian Dinners - Service for Banquets and Parties 
3869 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF 

Phone KEUog 2- 7404 

GLENN-ROBERTS COMPANY 

Manufacturers Transformer Type Welders 
1009 FRUITVALE AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF 

Phone TRinidad 3000 Ladies' and Children's Quality Apparel 

THE FRANCES SHOP 

Specializing in Silk and Wash Frocks - Infants' Wear 
5770 FOOTHILL BLVD. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



October, 1941 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



promise with indecency. 

In surveying the advances of our profession, we can 
take great pride in the fact that America today has all the 
advantages of a national police with none of its objection- 
able features. Inspired by the sacredness of a common 
task, law enforcement presents a solid front of courage 
and integrity ready to continue at any sacrifice to carry 
out its assignment of protecting America. I am certain 
that in this time of war the country can feel safe in the 
knowledge that its internal defenses are manned by thee 
gallant, skilled, self-sacrificing, patriotic law enforcement 
officers, trained in modern methods and vitalized by the 
spirit that has made America great — the spirit that will 
continue to make America endure and conquer every 
foe from within or without. May we continue to dedi- 
cate ourselves to this task! 

(To be continued) 



S. F. POLICE DEPARTMENT BUYS 
$25,000 WAR BONDS 

The members of the San Francisco Police Department 
bought $25,000 worth of war bonds during the Third 
War Bond Drive. 

This is a splendid record when it is considered that 




Paying Over $25,000 for War Bonds For S. F. Police Department. 
Back, row, left to right: Traffic Officer Michael Reilly and Arthur 
Garratt, Officers Henry Smith. Herbert King and }. ). McGovern. 
Front row: Leo Tait. Officer George Langley, and Controller 
Harold Boyd. 

nearly 200 members of the Department are now in the 
various branches of the armed force of the country. 

At the conclusion of the drive this month, a committee 
of Police Officers headed by President George Langley of 
the Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association, and Officers 
Michael Reilly, Arthur Garratt, Henry Smith, Herbert 
King and J. J. McGovern, all members of the Association's 
board of trustees presented the Department's check for the 
purchase of $25,000 worth of bonds to Leo Tait, who 
headed the drive made by the City employees' organization, 
and City Controller Harold Boyd. 

In presenting the Association's check, Officer Langley 



"About 200 members of our Department are in the 
armed forces and the best way we can insure their quick 
return is to buy more war bonds." 

The Widows' and Orphans' sAsociation's funds are kept 
in trust for the exclusive benefits of the widows and orphans 
of deceased police officers. 



Phone HEmlock 69 10 



Sheet Iron and Heavy Plate Work 



MONTAGUE PIPE & STEEL CO. 

Riveted, and Welded Steel Pipe, Oil and Water Tanks, Stacks, 
Well Casing, Asphalt Dipping, Pipe Wrapping 



1999 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Office THornwall 3822; Res. THornwall 2267 

GEORGE H. SISSON 

Real Estate - Licensed Broker - Notary Public - General Insurance 

2907 TELEGRAPH AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 6618 

PHILIP E. HAULTAIN 

Chains - Beltings - Sprockets - Bearings - V Belts - Pulleys 

245 I2TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone OLympic I 944- I 945 

MIRAMONTE COMPANY 



3426 TELEGRAPH AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 29 12 



Chas. Datridge 



MERRITT HAMMAM BATHS 

Expert Masseurs - Turkish and Russian - Tub or Shower Baths 35c 
S W. CORNER 9TH and FRANKLIN STS. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Hlgatc 4010 

J. H. MACPHERSON 

OPTOMETRIST 



487 FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

MILLER & WARNECKE 

FINANCIAL CENTER BLDC. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

WHITAKER 

Complete Wiring Assemblies - Automotive and Aircraft Cables 
Battery Cables - Terminals 

2449 VALDEZ STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Louis Brignoli and Frank M. Banks 

LE BANK CAFE 

2235 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

DUNN PAPER COMPANY 

Fine Papers and Office Supplies 
613 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 6522 

W. C. TAIT CO. 

General Contractors 

461 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 6327 

G. H. McCALLUM CO. 

Printers - Specializing in Daily Menus 

129 SACRAMENTO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



E. CLEMENS HORST CO 

Hops, Barley, Malt 
235 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Try Your Hand At This List 



October, 1943 



True and False Questions Taken From Cap 

99. Records of the number of persons arrested and 
records of the number of crimes disposed of by arrest 
are generally accurate indices of the efficiency of the 
police department as an enforcement agency. 

100. Following are the offenses classified under Part I — 
"Offenses known to the police" in the Uniform 
Crime Reports: Rape, Criminal Homicide, Em- 
bezzlement, Auto Theft, Aggravated Assault, 
Burglary and Robbery. 

101. The defendant charged with a felony must in all 
cases be taken before the magistrate who issued the 
warrant. 

102. If an arrest is made* under the authority of a war- 
rant, the officer must show the warrant if requested. 

103. Weapons taken from an arrested person must be 
delivered to the magistrate before whom he is taken. 

104. A criminal action against an accessory to the com- 
mission of a felony may not be prosecuted until after 
the principal has been brought to trial. 

105. When an information is filed the defendant must in 
all cases be arraigned thereon before the court in 
which it is filed. 

106. It is a misdemeanor for a public officer acting with- 
out lawful authority to arrest a person. 

107. Unless the party dies within a year and a day after 
the stroke received or the cause of death administered 
a charge of murder will not hold. 

108. The only pleas to an indictment are Guilty and 
Not Guilty. 

109. The process by which the attendance of a witness 
before a court or magistrate is required is a sub- 
poena. 

110. According to the penal code, "assault" and "bat- 
tery" are synonymous terms. 

111. An officer is justified in killing a person in all cases 
where he attempts to escape arrest. 

112. Robbery which is perpetrated by a person armed 
with a deadly weapon is robbery in the first degree. 

113. Willful inhumanity by an officer towards any 
prisoner in his custody is punishable by fine and by 
removal from office. 

114. Misdemeanors and felonies are divisions of crime ac- 
cording to seriousness of offense. 

115. In all criminal actions it is necessary that the de- 
fendant be present when the verdict is rendered. 

116. A general verdict is that by which the jury finds the 
facts only, leaving the judgment to the court. 

117. The jurisdiction lies in either county when a public 
offense is committed partly in one county and partly 
in another. 

118. Whenever no specific punishment is prescribed for a 
felony such felony is punishable in a state prison 
not exceeding five years. 

119. In every crime or public offense there must exist a 
union or joint operation of act and intent or crimi- 



tains and Lieutenants Examination of 1942 

nal negligence. 

120. In order to prove a person is not of sound mind, it 
is required that he be proved an idiot or a lunatic. 

121. A person is incapable of committing a crime if he 
committed the act charged without being conscious 
thereof. 



KEY CAFE 



523 1 COLLEGE at Broadway 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phon? Piedmont I 146 



Walter N. Boysen. President 



WALTER N. BOYSEN CO. 

Manufacturers Paints - Varnishes - Enamels 
42ND and LINDEN STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone HUmbolt 05 12 

CLYDE O. SWEET 

REALTOR 

COLLECE AT BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 1411 



Linotype - Ludlow - Display Type 



BLADE & ZIEGLER 

TYPOGRAPHERS 

324 THIRTEENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phones: Office — HUmboldt 5400 Res. — OLympic 5 760 

PALACE VAN 8C STORAGE CO. 



LLOYD C. ALT 



3630 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 8400 

Western Door 8C Sash Company 



5TH and CYPRESS STREETS 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 9299- 



Harry Duncan - Ona Oldaker 



DICK'S INN 

Wines - Liquor - Cigarettes 



MM STANFORD AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Olympic 5 000 



Oscar Nelson 



THE PIEDMONT 

Black & White Liquors 
4096-4098 PIEDMONT AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

W.-.P. FULLER & CO. 

FULLER PAINTS (They last) . GLASS 
259 TENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone OLympic 9934 



Free Delivery 



GEORGE'S QUALITY MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 



42 13 PIEDMONT AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 8836 Always a fine entertainment for less money 

New Shanghai Cafe-Terrace Bowl 

Largest in East Bav - Three Floor Shows: 7, 9:30, and Midnight 
$2 Minimum Per Person, may be consumed in food or drinks. 

4 15 to 429 10TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 1700 



Johnny Lukanish 



MOTOR RADIO SUPPLY CO. 

2819 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF 



October, 194 3 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



122. Any person who advises and encourages a crime is 
an accessory to such crime. 

123. The punishment is in all cases the same for an acces- 
sory to a crime as it is for the principal. 

124. A police officer cannot be penalized for corruptly 
attempting to influence a juror if he does so in the 
interests of justice. 

125. A person who give an affirmation instead of an oath 
cannot be convicted of perjury even though he will- 
fully gives false testimony. 

126. An unqualified statement of that which one does not 
know to be true is equivalent to a statement of that 
which one knows to be false. 

127. Subornation of perjury means that a person gives 
false testimony unwittingly. 

128. A police officer who beats a person without lawful 
necessity is subject to criminal action. 

129. In order to constitute murder, malice must be ex- 
pressed. 

130. Murder perpetrated by means of poison constitutes 
murder in the first degree. 

131. Voluntary manslaughter is the unlawful killing of 
a human being without malice upon a sudden quar- 
rel or heat of passion. 

Phone HEmlock 1480 

W. S. WETENHALL CO. 

Reinforcing Steel Bars - Blaw-Knox Steel Floor Grating 
I7TH and WISCONSIN STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

ELITE MACHINE WORKS 

22 7 7TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



31 




MISSION ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Market 7670 



COLONIAL CAFETERIA 



A Good Place to Eat 

1504 FRANKLIN ST, near Fifteenth St. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEUog 3-5565 



Open Evenings 



Factory To You 



KAY CHESTERFIELD MFG. CO. 

Complete Home Furnishers - Living Room Furniture - Upholstering 
5434 EAST I4TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 5588 



Leon Hommel 



LEON HOMMEL MACHINE WORKS 



2340 ADELINE STREET at 24th Street 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 4700 

CHECKER VAN & STORAGE CO. 



622 I7TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlnate 8807 



WEST COAST JEWELRY CO. 

Manufacturers of Gold and Platinum Jewelry 



112 1 WASHINGTON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 63 70 Tim Hershal 

THE BERKELEY INN 

All Outside Rooms 
HASTE at TELEGRAPH BERKELEY, CALIF. 











After the War. . .what? 

Are you planning today for the home you'd like to build 
when this Emergency is over? SAVE NOWfor the down 
payment, so that you will be in a position to obtain an 
F. H. A. loan when materials are once more available. 

Call any office of The San Francisco Bank for details on 
how you may own your home when this War is over. 

-»» For 75 years an expert in Home Finance -««- 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 1868 TRUST 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
SEVEN OFFICES . . . EACH A COMPLETE BANK 







Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



October, 1943 



BAY AREA MEN SERVE 

NOW IN MILITARY FORCE 

An opportunity exists for San Francisco Area Men not 
already serving their country in the armed forces to per- 
form an exciting, vital job. It is to help guard the San Fran- 
cisco Waterfront. 

Men work as members of the San Francisco regiment of 
the Volunteer Port Security Force, United States Coast 
Guard. The regiment, organized by Commander Roy C. 
Ward, United States Coast Reserve, is recruiting appli- 
cants for its ranks among all draft-exempt men in the Bay 
Area between the ages of 25 and 65. 

When properly trained, the men will take over the 
work of guarding the docks, ships in port, and other wa- 
terfront facilities. This duty is now a function of the 
regular Coast Guard, and as volunteers become available, 
regular Coast Guardsmen will be released for combat duty 
overseas. Duty consists of two six-hour watches per week. 
Men in normal health, between the ages of 25 and 65, 
are eligible. 

In addition 200 to 300 women can serve as stenogra- 
phers and clerical assistants at the Regimental head- 
quarters. 

A recruiting drive to build the Volunteer Port Security 
Force to its full authorized strength was launched today 
by Commander Ward, United States Coast Guard Re- 
serve, who heads the San Francisco Regiment. 

The attractive uniform of the United States Coast 
Guard Port Security Forces will be supplied free of 
charge to the men who qualify for this volunteer duty. 
These distinctive uniforms consist of blue single-breasted 
coat, straight cut trousers and white visor cap. The insignia 
of the Coast guard appears on the cap and the coat 
lapels. In addition, each volunteer is supplied with white 
shirts, black ties, rain coat, pea jacket, black shoes and 
other essential clothing, without cost. 

Women joining the Volunteer Port Security Force will 
wear a blue two-piece single-breasted suit with a blue 
overseas cap. This uniform is also furnished at no cost 
to the volunteer. 

While the members of this new wartime service serve 
on a part-time basis and without pay, they are, while 
on duty, as much a part of the Coast Guard as any other 
member of the service. While in uniform and on duty 
they are entitled to all the privileges and authority of 
the Armed Forces of the United States. Likewise, they 
are subject to all of the regulations and discipline. They 
divest themselves of these responsibilities and this author- 
ity when off duty and out of uniform. 

Commander Ward, in urging volunteers to apply to 
244 California Street, second floor, stated that similar 
Volunteer Port Security Service Forces are being organ- 
ized throughout the country in all seaports. The first 
regiment, he said, was established in Philadelphia under 
an act of Congress entitled, "The Coast Guard Aux- 
iliary and Reserve Act of 1941." 



Compliments of 

SCOTTISH TAVERN 

555 TURK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

The Pacific Molasses Co., Ltd. 

2 15 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 971 I 



Dinners and Luncheons 



VENETO RESTAURANT 

Banquet Rooms for Special Parties - Venetian Bar 

SAN FRANCISCO 



389 BAY STREET 



Compliments of 

WILLIAM F. DWYER, M. D. 

350 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



Phone CArfield 9932 



Bath Privileges Free to Guests 



HOTEL RITCH 

Shower and Tub Baths - A High Class, Clean and Orderly Home 

73 1 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 

Phone Mission 4030 

FRASER & JOHNSTON CO. 

Sheet Metal Fabricators 



725 POTRERO AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Watson Spicer Flexible Shafts - Watson-Brown-Lipe Auxiliary 
Transmissions - Brown-Lipe Transmissions & Power Take Offs 

H. S. WATSON CO. 

Spicer Universal Joints 
1145 HARRISON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 9965 



H. E. RUSSELL 

Auto and Truck Repairing - Towing 
730-32 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone CRaystone 9783 



PADRE BAR 

COCKTAILS 



235 JONES STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 9873 

HARRY'S CUSHION SHOP 

Truck Cushions - Tops and Curtains - Tarpaulins Made and Repaired 
I 144 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: Office CArfield 9300; Home Fillmore 015 1 

WM. LYONS 

Bail Bonds 

65 7 MERCHANT STREET, bet. Montg. 8. Kearny SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 6478 



Auto and Truck Repairing 



FRANK and RAY 

LOGAN DIAZ 



55 IITH STREET, bet. Mission 6c Market 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 5 13 1 



GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO. 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 



NINTH and HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



BAY COUNTIES PEACE OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 1 1 ) 
Belloni. 

San Bruno — Chief William L. Maher, Lieutenant John 
N. Sayer, City Clerk Ralph E. Woodman. 

San Jose — Chief J. N. Black, Major Harry Diffenbaugh, 
City Clerk J. J. Lynch, Sergeant John R. Blackmore, Rev. 
John J. Laherty, Tim Sullivan. 

Palo Alto — H. A. Zink, Lieutenant Elmer E. Dakin, 
Sergeant Roht. D. Fletcher. 

Daly City — Mayor A. J. Gaggers, Chief James G. 
Reardon, Councilman J. J. Fahey. 

Redwood City — Chief C. L. Collins, Councilman G. 
W. McNulty, City Recorder T. C. Rice. 

San Carlos — Chief E. J. Wheeler, Mayor A. H. Sage- 
horn. 

Piedmont — Chief William V. Pflaum, Captain Dan 
W. James and Inspector George W. Hanson. 

Santa Rosa — Deputy Sheriff William E. Cook, Jr., 
Assistant District Attorney Charles J. McGoldrick, 
Deputy District Attorney Joseph Maddux. 

Richmond — Inspector F. A. Leber, C. N. P. 

Sebastopol — Chief E. J. Foster and Captain James E. 
Morris. 

San Leandro — Chief L. F. Peralta and Captain A. J. 
LaMowreau. 

Crockett — Deputy Sheriff J. M. Joseph. 

Atherton — Commander Grover A. Miller, U.S.N. 

Norfolk, Va. — Read Admiral Hugo Osterhaus. 

From Treasure Island — Vice Admiral J. W. Green- 
slade; Commander H. S. Covington; Commander H. M. 
McKinley; Commander G. A. Miller; Commander B. V. 
D. Scott; Commander M. L. Smith; Lieutenant Com- 
mander P. H. Devine; Lieutenant Commander W. J. 
Quinn; Lieutenant Commander H. D. Pischel; Major C. 
A. Milham; Lieutenant Colonel Charles Steele, Northern 
California, W.D.C.; Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Bard, 7-49, 
Military Police Battalion; Lieutenant Colonel Francis Latz, 
7-71, Military Police Anti-Sabotage Battalion.; Lieutenant 
Commander A. E. Covey; Lieutenant H. D. Elliott; Lieu- 
tenant P. L. Haggard; L. W. Lane, Jr.; William T. 
Byrnes; E. A. Skinner, Jr.; Louis Porter, Jr.; and Ensign 
Robert L. Hunt. 



S. F. WARNED ON LACE PEDDLER 

Beware of the winsome lace peddler who appears at 
your door with an offer of some rare Irish laces, the Better 
Business Bureau warns San Francisco housewives. 

The Bureau said several persons have been duped when 
they made cash payments for what they supposed was im- 
ported Irish linens. Instead of buying, notify the Better 
Business Bureau or the Police Department, officials said. 

Phone SUtter 5695 

WESTERN SHIP SERVICE CO. 





560 K S F O 560 




SIDNEY ROGER, NEWS COMMENTATOR 




8:15 AM 2:00 PM 
1 1:00 AM 6:30 PM 


Phones: 


GArfield 7 119 - YUkon 2343 



SYSTEM FREIGHT SERVICE 

System - Speed - Service - The Mark of Responsibility" 
235 SPEAR STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

COLISEUM BOWL 



45 ELEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 683 1 Chipping. Scaling and Painting 

GENERAL SHIPS SERVICE CO. 

Chemical Steam Cleaning - Tank Cleaning and Gas Freeing 

Sand Blasting - Boiler Cleaning 

88-96 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 8369 

TURNER RESILIENT FLOORS, INC. 

*'A Nation-Wide Organization" 



141 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

NEW HAMPSHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

200 BUSH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

HAMPTON COURT APARTMENTS 

3 78 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 9430 



Free Barbecue Saturday Nights 



KRELING'S CAFE 

FLUKIE ESTHER 



3071 I6TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone OLympic 7239 

ART TOOL AND DIE WORKS 

Builders of Tools, Dies, Jigs, Fixtures and Experimental Work 
1014 SIXTIETH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone FRuitvale 1531-1532 San Francisco Yards: 1435 Market St. 

SYMON BROS. 

Wholesale Jobbers in Building Materials, Lumber, Plumbing Goods, 
Electrical Supplies, Wall boards, Hardware, Glass, Windows, Etc. 



22ND AVENUE AND EAST I4TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

GEO. E. HONN CO. 

420 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill I 160 

THE VIAVI COMPANY 

Pharmaceutical Preparations 
50 FELL STREET, bet. Market and Van Ness SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 065 7 

HORSFORD BROS. CO. 

Power Transmission Equipment - Mill Supplies 

944 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ZACK RADIO SUPPLY CO. 

Direct Factory Distributors 

1426 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 

"Good Books of All Publishers" 



178 FREMONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 85 McALLISTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, J 943 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Philco Radio & Television Corporation 
A division of 

PHILCO CORPORATION 



Phone SUtter 3943 

PACIFIC MACHINERY CO. 



647 Russ Building 



San Francisco 156 Montgomery Street 



San Francisco 



PALACE GRILL 

R. D. DIEZ. Proprietor 
604 14th Street — Bet. Jefferson and Grove 
Phone Hlgate 93 76 OAKLAND. CALIF. 

HARRY KAHAN 

Mfg. Jeweler 
Platinum Work • Diamond Salting 

Room 357 Blake Block Hlgate 1344 

112 1 Washington St. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

OLympic 2490 — Connecting All Departments 

STAR GROCERY 

Highest QuaLty Groceries, Meats, Fruits, 

Vegetables, Wines and L'quors 
3068 Claremont Ave. BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Multigraphing, Mimeographing, Mailing Lists 
Compl .te Direct Mail Service 

THOMSON'S LET1ER SHCP 

Harold Thomson 

1755 Broadway OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TEmpl bar 5 181 

Telephones GLencourt 6640-664 1 

E. H. HUEBBE 

Bookbinder and Manufacturing Stationer 

Graphic Arts Building 

1537 Webster Street OAKLAND 

Phone KEl'ogg 3-5525 

PAUL M. HUSTON 

Motor Tuneup, Lubrication, Car Washing 

Wheel Alignment, Brake Service 

1201 • 31st Ave. Oakland, Calif. 

Phone: TEmplebar 5355 Res. ANdover 9744 

DR. W. FRANKLIN MORRIS 

Suite 308. Fox Oakland Theatre Bldg. 
519 Nineteenth St. Oakland 12. Calif. 

Phone OLympic 9068 

CALIFORNIA TOY CO. 

Chas. Fritz, Mgr. 

DOLL HOSPITAL 

1611 Harmon St. South Berkeley, Calif. 

Phone DOuglas 0770 

ELECTRIC SMELTING CO. 

Smelters, Refiners, Dealers 
91 Federal St. San Francisco 

LEEPER & REINHARD 

MASTER PAINTERS 

1465 Stevenson St. MArket 3931 

Bet. Valencia and Mission Sts. — Near 14th 

San Francisco 

ARDELL'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Specializing in Oil Permanent Waves 

Experts in All Lines of Beauty Culture 

819 Divisadero St. Fillmore 1195 

Phone DOuglas 8648 Charles P. Low, Mgr. 

Forbidden City Supper Club 

Dinner Dancing - All-Star Chinese Show 
363 Sutter Street San Francisco 

Phone MArket 2910 

BETTER VALUE MARKET 

Groceries. Fruits and Vegetables 
Cor. 18th and Connecticut San Francisco 



Phone UNderhill 4828 Delindo Bartolacelli 

GRAND CENTRAL GARAGE 

General Auto Repairs 
66 Page Street, near Market San Francisco 



Phon? WEst 1 100 



"Gets Results" 



TESLUCK CO. 

Real Estate - Insurance Brokers 
2076 Sutter Street San Francisco 

Alta Sheet Metal Works 

Ga r - Furnaces - Automatic Water Heaters 

Patent Chimneys - Tops - Skylights 

1072 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 7667 Work Clothes, Etc. 

MOELLERICH 8C CO. 

Wholesale Distributors Men's Furnishings 
5 50 Mission Street San Francisco 



M. G. WEST COMPANY 

Office Furniture and Filing Equipment 
115-117 Front Street San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 2636 V. Scarpulla 

TORTOLA TAMALE CAFE 

123 7 Po!k Street, near Bush San Francisco 
Phone EXbrook 7050 Donald A. Yee 

CHINESE KITCHEN 

Spic *N Span Chinese Food Delivery Service 
Mason at Pacific San Francisco 

ARTVOGUE 

Sportswear Made in California 
16 Minna Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 1809 

ATKINSON-STUTZ CO. 

Wholesale Lumber and its Products 
112 Market Street San Francisco 

Phone Piedmont 6600 Insurance Counselors 

HARVEY BLAIR 8C CO. 

Real Estate Brokers 
3817 San Pablo Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Piedmont 443 3 Traffic Counters 

Dozier Manufacturing Co. 

Meteorological Instruments - Specialties 
422 3 Grove Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 8000 

GEORGE WALLING 

BEE LINE TRUCK DISPATCH 
2713 San Pablo Avenue Oakland. Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 3913 

COTELLA BROS. 

Wholesale Fruits and Produce 
43 1-433 Second Street Oakland, Calif. 

Cmopliments of 

DIAMOND 5c 8C 10c STORE 



Ph. ELkridge 3544 A. Pantaleoni J. Picchi 

COLOMBO BOX COMPANY 

Orange Boxas. Celery Crates, Apple Boxes 
Box 138 Colma, Calif. 



Phone Mission 3897 



Call and Delivered 



Apex Venetian Blind Service Co. 

Free Estimates 
1367 Valencia Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

JOE NEALON'S PLACE 



222 Embarcadero 



San Francisco 



Compliments of 

LYNCH 'S 



16th and Valencia Street 



San Francisco 



Phone GArfield 8798 Al Bigon, Asst. Mgr. 

Aeroil Burner Company, Inc. 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment 
435 Bryant Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

FINLEY 8C MILLER BUFFET 

1298 Market Street • 137 Bush Street 

San Francisco 

Phone EXbrook 3200 

BRIZARD & YOUNG 

Sheet Metal Products 
72 Tehama Street San Francisco 

Phone RAndolph 9 766 

VIC AND CHARLIE'S PLACE 

Fin:: Wines and Liquors 
4 798 Mission Street San Francisco 

Ph. UNderhill 5535 G. Biggio C. Manincor 

IL MONTE CAFE 

All Kinds of Wine, Liquors and Beer 
597 Hayes Street San Francisco 

Phone TUxedo 2552 Bowling Alleys, etc. 

CHAS. PASSOW 8c SONS 

Billiard and Pocket Billard Tables, etc. 
43 7 Eddy Street San Francisco 

Phone DOuglas 9915 Booths For Ladies 

DICK VALERGA'S CORNER 

Breakfast and Lunch Served - Sandwiches 
401 6th St., cor. Harrison St. San Francisco 

Phone PRospect 5626 We Call and Deliver 

LILY FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Quality Work at Reasonable Prices 
45 5 Eddy Street San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 9449 Ernest Kopp 

Eat. Drink and Be Merry at 

THE HAPPY OLD CORNER 

San Francisco 



1 7th and Capp Streets 



2 124 Hopkins Street 



Oakland, Calif. 



Phone EXbrook 7727 

GEO. ZWILLINGER 

Wholesale Dealer in: Diamonds - Watches 
704 Market Street Room 610 San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 66 12 H. G. 0"Hanlon 

General Pacific Scale Co. 

Manufacturers - Heavy Duty Scale Repairing 
464 Seventh Street San Francisco 



Phone HEmlock 0982 



Free Estimates Phone KEllog 2-1042 

W. E. LIVELY & SON 

Frame Straightening and Wheel Alignment 
160 HAYES STREET 



Manufacturer — Packer — Distributer 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GANN PRODUCTS COMPANY 

Cellophane Package Merchandise - Helen's Corn Bread 
Pie Crust and Biscuit Mix 

1240-42 E. 14TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF 



Phone BAyview 582 1 

SUNSHINE MATTRESS & QUILT SHOP 

Mattresses and Quilts Made to Order 
240 CLEMENT STREET near 4th Ave 



School Trade is Our Specialty 



Renovating and Sterilizing a Specialty Phone TEmplebar 6505 

O'MALLEY'S MUSIC SHOP 

"Everything in the Musical Line*' 
SAN FRANCISCO 1108 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

(Continued from Page 7 ) 
for taking care of the shortage which exists as a whole 
throughout the country. All of the plans and suggestions 
proposed in the past to provide manpower for essential 
industry, has been weighed in the balance and found 
wanting. In this period of national emergency, the strength 
of law enforcement is almost as important as the strength 
of our armed forces. Yet local Police Departments are 
sorely under-manned and ill-equipped. Last January a 
special committee of twenty-five members was appointed 
by the president of this Association to gather data from 
all over the United States, analyze and co-relate this 
information, and to later meet with Governor Warren 
and Colonel Leitch, State Director of Selective Service, 
to review and discuss the entire police manpower situa- 
tion in California. The two meetings of this committee 
have been held — one in Sacramento and the second in 
the City of Los Angeles. A sub-committee of this group 
met with the Governor and Colonel Leitch in the Capitol 
Building in Sacramento. The manpower situation as it 
relates to law enforcement was reviewed, discussed and 
analyzed; certain changes and improvements were rec- 
ommended and agreed upon, and I say with assurance 
that every member of that committee felt satisfied with 
the results of the conference. We must consider not only 
our own position in this matter, we must also consider 
the position of those charged with the fair and impartial 
functioning of the selective service system. 

The list of essential activities was prepared by the 
United States Employment Service at the direction of 
the war-manpower commission. Essential governmental 
services are defined as those necessary for the maintenance 
of health, safety, and morale, and the prosecution of the 
war. There are those who believe that regular law enforce- 
ment officers should be considered essential to public 
health and security and therefore not available for military 
duty. However, if policemen must be called to carry out 
the victory program, then nothing must stand in the way 
of their going. The American high command must know 
what it must have. * * * Industry as well as the 
armed forces must be kept supplied with vitally important 
manpower. Production must be kept ahead of the growth 
of the armed forces. As more men are inducted the 
war equipment for them must be ready. Too large an 
army without enough guns, too big a navy without enough 



Phone OLympic 2620 



DIAMOND DAIRY 



Products of Quality 



4706 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone CArfield 8700 Mill: Niles, Calif. Phone Niles 33 11 

PACIFIC STATES STEEL CORP. 

Electric Furnace Steel 
3 18 R1ALTO BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SKyline 3391 



FARMERS' MARKET 



83 1 CLEMENT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phon: OLympic 4631 

BURROWS, "The Meat Man" 

Complete Food Market 

4345 SAN PABLO AVENUE EMERYVILLE, CALIF. 



Phon; DEiaware 4981 

COLMA BOX COMPANY 

Boxes and Crates 
40 RAINIER STREET, P. O. Box 1712 COLMA. CALIF. 



EL NIDO MARKET 

Imported and Domestic Groceries - Fruits and Vegetables 

Richmond Annex „ .,, . . ,_ 

SAN PABLO «t SACRAMENTO AVE., opp. Stockton St. OAKLAND 



Phone KEllog 3-3883 

ROY'S TIRE & BATTERY SERVICE 

New Tires, Tubes and Recapping - National Batteries 
1248 HIGH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone SWeetwood 5800 



A. L. JENSEN 

Realtor - Insurance 



6106 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 0169 Distributor Vogue Custom Built Tyres 

CHAS. F. SUTHERLAND 

Goodyear Tires - Retreading - Recapping- Regrooving 

3326 PIEDMONT AVENUE at Broadway OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

WELDING ENGINEERING CO. 



1009 CYPRESS STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments from 
A WELL WISHER 



WATCH A GOOD ENVELOPE 

. . . come to the top of the pile as Miss Secretary opens the morning mail. 

Consult Our Planning Department 

FIELD-ERNST ENVELOPE CO. 



245 FIFTH STREET 



Designers and Manufacturers 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



October, 1942 



ships, or too big an air force without enough planes, 
would be fully as disastrous as too small an army to meet 
the enemy. 

Law enforcement is but one of a large number of ac- 
tivities which has been declared essential to the war 
effort. Congress has not seen fit to exempt from the 
operation of the selective service law, any group of peo- 
ple, because of their occupation. From the beginning of 
hostilities to the present time, dependency status has been 
the deciding factor in most cases and consequently law 
enforcement has lost large numbers of trained men, and 
the loss of these men has been a serious blow to all of us. 
I believe, however, that future enlistment or induction of 
police officers into the armed forces will be practically 
eliminated, if enforcement officials avail themselves of 
the opportunities now at their disposal to prevent it. 

Law and Legislation 

I want to take this opportunity to express the appre- 
ciation of the Peace Officers' Association of California 
to Ralph E. Hoyt, District Attorney of Alameda County, 
and to J. F. Coakley, Chief Assistant District Attorney 
of Alameda County, for their tireless efforts in behalf of 
this Association, during the meetings of the Law and 
Legislative Committees, and during the sessions of the 
Legislature in Sacramento. 

I also want to express my personal appreciation and 
that of the Association to Nat J. L. Pieper, Chief Special 
Agent in charge, F.B.I., San Francisco, Harold Nathan, 
Special Agent in charge, F.B.I. , San Diego, Richard B. 
Hood, Special Agent in charge, F.B.I., Los Angeles, and 
their associates, for the very material contribution of the 
Federal Bureau to the cause of law enforcement in Cali- 
fornia, during the past year. We appreciate very much, 
the friendship, cooperation and assistance of the F.B.I. 

In the few moments that has been allotted to me this 
morning, I could not begin to review all that the profes- 
sion has accomplished during the past year. Day after 
day, despite increasing difficulties, we have struggled to 
keep abreast of our responsibilities. Let us continue to 
dedicate ourselves to this task. 

Phone Piedmont 4220 



Phone DOuglas 0B30 

ADOLPH BLAICH INC. 

CUTLERY & SPORTING GOODS 
Exclusively Wholesale 



543 HOWARD 3TREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 7580 



New Construction: Mariposa Street Plant 



MARTINOLICH SHIPBUILDING CO. 

Designers - Builders - Repairers 
Five Marine Railways - Pier 52, Plant 



SAN FRANCISCO 



J. J. KRIEG CO. 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 



FRUITVALE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phones: BErkeley 7322-7323-7324 Beef - Calves - Lambs - Hogs 



LEWIS 8C McDERMOTT 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 



SECOND STREET, near GILMAN 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 4-0513 

ART RATTAN WORKS 

Incorporated 
DISTINCTIVE RATTAN FURNITURE 

Factories: Oakland. Calif.: Mansfield. Ohio; Topton. Pa. 



12 18 MILLER AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF 



Phone LAkehurst 2995') 



THE ISLAND CLUB 



2320 i 2 SANTA CLARA 



ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 4016 



For Reservations 



BOS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

Riggers - Steel Erectors 



CALIFORNIA RECREATION CO. 

BOWLING AND BILLIARDS - FOR HEALTH - FOR FUN 



FOOT OF PARK AVENUE 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



15 15 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



PACIFIC COAST ENGINEERING CO. 



MISS SA YLOR'S 

CHOCOLATES AND COFFEE-ETS, TOO, HAVE GONE TO WAR, „., __„. „, „ 

Snip Builders - Plate Steel Fabricators 

BUT WILL BE BACK AGAIN Hydraulic Dredge Equipment 

P. O. DRAWER E ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Phone YUkon 2343 

v UNITED PACIFIC INSURANCE CO. 

Kellogg ExpreSS and Draying Company Home Office: Tacoma. Washington 

235 SPEAR STREET SAN FRANCISCO 206 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



October, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



STATE CONVENTION 

(Continued from Page 6) 

way Patrol has lost 70 per cent of its personnel. 

Chief Dullea said the San Francisco Department has 
lost about 20 per cent to selective service and enlistments. 

Chief Greenings said the Berkeley department has suf- 
fered as much as any police department in the state and 
that they tried taking 4F's as recruits but it had proven 
adverse. He told of the work of the committee he headed 
in getting some relief from the selective service heads, and 
that there would probably not be so many police officers 
taken in the future as has been the case since the war 
started. 

Lieutenant Commander George Bereton, who did so 
much in the years before the war to establish training 
programs for law enforcement agencies, was introduced 
and made a short address, paying high respects for the 
peace officers of this state for the support and cooperation 
exercised toward the shore patrol. 

Commander H. M. McKinley, morale officer for the 
Navy, was introduced on the final day of the meet and 
he said he had taken every experienced police officer in 
this area who joined the Navy and put them in shore 
patrol work, and these men have proven the wisdom of 
his course. 

On the final day of the convention Rabbi Irving F. 
Reichert, Congregational Emanu-El, started the day by 
pronouncing the invocation. 

The only speaker scheduled for this day was Allen 
Moore, state parole officer, who selected as his topic, 
"Cooperation Between the State Bureau of Parole and 
Peace Officers of California." 

Mr. Moore, who is a forceful speaker, set forth the plans 
of the prison authorities and said that his department 
working with these prison leaders were trying to send 
men out of state prison so they could take their place as 
respected citizens. He said they were meeting with success 
and the number of repeaters is being lessened each year. 

He asked the peace officers to help them determine 
action of prisoners applying for parole to fill out and mail 
promptly questionnaires from the parole board. 

Chief Assistant District Attorney Frank Coakley of 
Alameda, in reporting for the Law and Legislative Com- 
mittee of the Association, said that the peace officers, in- 
cluding the California Highway Patrol, fare well with the 
1943 session of the legislature, and that some good bills 
went through and some bad ones were stopped. 

W. C. Schoppe of the National Auto Theft Bureau 
reported on the Motor Vehicle legislation and we will 
publish his report. 

Other committees reporting on the closing day was the 
resolutions committee headed by Chief Howard Zink of 
Palo Alto. 

One of its resolutions was one thanking Mayor Angelo 
J. Rossi, Chief Dullea, and Administrator Thomas Brooks 
for the splendid time furnished the visitors and for the 
care that was given all who attended the convention. 

Chief Donald Wood, of San Anselmo, chairman of the 
memorial committee, presented a resolution memorializing 



Vince Monzo 



Lena Pagni 



NEW PORT COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Specializing in 
ITALIAN DINNERS 



Telephone HIgate 9413 



131 Broadway 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 



OLympic 7710 



BELFAST BEVERAGE CO. 



3521 CHESTNUT STREET 



OAKLAND 



Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, Los Angeles, San Diego, Las Vegas 



MILLS SALES COMPANY LTD. 

AUTOMATIC MERCHANDISING MACHINES 



WARREN H. TAYLOR 

Sales Manager 

Res. Phone KEllogg 2-S303 



1640 18th Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone HIgate 0230 



Phone UNderhill 5667-5568 

Metal Products Fabricating Co. 

PIPE BENDING - WELDING - MACHINE WORK 



119-125 Kansas Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

General Contractors of 

STREETS, SIDEWALKS AND BASEMENT FLOORS 

ASPHALTUM AND BITUMEN A SPECIALTY 

Office and Yard 

1540 SIXTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone MArket 6046-6047 



BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 



Phone SUtter 3 114 



U. S. PIPE 8C MANUFACTURING CO. 

Pipe - Vales - Fittings - Fabricating 



249 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 
MANNINGS, INC. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



October, J 943 



the departed members of the Association during the past 
year and which included Captain Duncan Matheson, 
Chief Ole Lund, Oroville, District Attorney John Dock- 
weiler, Sheriff Robert Taylor of Butte County, and 
Deputy Sheriff W. J. Bright, Los Angeles. 

Chief Schoppe, in reporting on the membership com- 
mittee, said that 54 new members were obtained at this 
session. 

Secretary James Drew reported on the office of secre- 
tary-treasurer and stated the Association was in good 
financial condition and it now has upward of 650 members. 

The nomination committee submitted the following 
names, who were elected as officers for the ensuing term I 

President — Sheriff Carl F. Rayburn, Riverside. 

First Vice President — Chief Charles W. Dullea, San 
Francisco. 

Second Vice President — Sheriff George J. Overholt, 
Fresno. 

Third Vice President — Chief Harold A. Vogelsang, 
Stockton. 

Fourth Vice President — Sheriff Howard P. Gleason, 
Alameda. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Chief C. B. Horrall, Los Angeles. 

The officers were installed by Chief Clifford A. Peterson 
of San Diego. 

Sheriff John Steckter of Napa presented the past presi- 
dent's jewel, and a life membership to Retiring President 
Chief McAllister. 

Chief Wallace of Fresno invited the Association to hold 
its meeting in 1944 in his city. This invitation was 
accepted. 

Captain E. L. Adcock of the Salinas Police Department 
presented an invitation to the Association to meet in that 
thriving city in 194^. This likewise was accepted. 

With the retirement of the colors, the meeting ad- 
journed, after the newly-elected officers had thanked the 
members for the honor of being selected to run the affairs 
of the Association the coming year. 



When in Oakland 



VISIT 



Olympic Hotel 8C Cocktail Lounge 

MR. & MRS. PAT BUCKMAN, Proprietors 



EAST I2TH at 2ND AVE. 
2 Blocks from Lake Merritt 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 192 7 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

(Continued from Page 8 ) 
James F. Low, Patrolman William D. McVey. 

The second prize was won by Company G (Richmond) 
with an aggregate score of 719. This team was composed 
of the following named men: Patrolmen Paul Warmser, 
George J. Sylvestri, Alfred Wiel, Eugene A. Wharton. 



REVOLVER COMPETITION AMONG 
INDIVIDUALS 

Senior Master and Expert Class: Corporal Edward E. 
Rosin, Company J. Score 18^. 

Sharpshooter Class: Corporal Charles A. King, Jr., 
Company D. Score 154, 

Marksmen Class: 1st Lieutenant Warren J. Telfer, 
Mounted Unit. Score 136. 

TRIBUNE SMOKE SHOP 

CHARLES WIENER 
1209 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



DUCHESS SANDWICH COMPANY 



2403. 5 CROVE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 4 12 1 



BEAR PHOTO SERVICE 



At Leading Druggists 



3620 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phonj Piedmont 8400 

CABINETS by 

PARAMOUNT Built-in Fixture Co. 



5 107 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TWinoaks 2400 



Lee R. Marpl?, owner 



CALIFORNIA BONDING AGENCY 

Member Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 39 



5 36 15TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



"THE FOOD YOU LIKE" 



All Stores Open Day and Night. 



GENE COMPTONS 

SAN FRANCISCO: 333 GEARY STREET - 144 ELLIS STREET 

8-10 KEARNY STREET - 45 POWELL STREET 

OAKLAND: I2TH & BROADWAY 



Phone Piedmont 1300 



E. H. Santos 



DuFrane Machine and Engine Works, Inc. 

ENGINEERS - MACHINISTS METALLIZERS 



3409 PIEDMONT AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phon- OLympic 885 1 



APEX MANUFACTURING CO. 



POWELL «t LANDREGAN STS. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



QQQy.Qty23Lq.QQQ 



In All Our Public Life 

The Police Officer's 

Best Friend 




Things To Remember 
About Mayor Rossi 

1. Has kept the Police Department out of 
politics. 

2. Has allowed the Police Department to 
be run by policemen instead of civilians. 

3. Opposed appointment of a retired Army 
officer as chief of police. Favored ap- 
pointment of Chief Dullea. 

4. Encouraged organization of San Fran- 
cisco Police Officers' Association. 

5. Favored increased pay for policemen. 

6. Favors better pension conditions for 
policemen. 

7. Favored modernization of department 
(two-way radio, new pistol range, etc.) 

Re-Elect 

Mayor ROSSI 



TV-fr-fr-fr-fr^-fr-fr-fr-fr-fr 



7/ Requires Skill 
to Repair Appliances 



Your Gas and Electric appliance 
repair dealer is an important man to 
know these days. He tries to keep as 
many replacement parts on hand as 
priorities, allotments, etc., will allow 
him. He has studied appliance repair, 
equipped his shop with the parts and 
repair tools needed to keep your 
home appliances operating efficiently 
for the duration. 

Just think now! What would you 
do if your washing machine, refriger- 
ator, vacuum cleaner or house-heating 
system got out of order? Fortunately, 
there are two things you can do 
about it: 

First, you can help avoid such an- 
noyances by proper care and use of 
your appliances. Do not abuse them. 
Keep them cleaned and oiled accord- 
ing to instructions. 

Second, when appliances get out 
of order call a skilled appliance 
repair man. He is your authorized 
repair dealer. Each office of this com- 
pany has a list of these men. Call 
your local P. G. and E. office when 
one of your home appliances breaks 
down and you do not know where 
to have it repaired. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned - Operated - Managed 

trf Calif orniam- 

P J GE 10-1043 



Stohl, Nels S 

270 Claremont Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



Sec. 567, P. L a R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit 3172 



JUDGE 
TWAIN MICHELSEN 

Should Be 

RE-ELECTED 

He has demonstrated his fearlessness as a 
Municipal Judge. He has made it his business 
to see that the narcotic dealer is properly 
punished when convicted. He has let it be 
known by judicial acts that the hardened 
crook, the stickup man, the burglar and other 
criminals find no sympathy in his court. He 
is a sincere student in traffic laws and he 
metes out proper penalties to the violators 
of these laws brought before him. 

Judge Michelsen has been endorsed by all 
leading political, civic and social organiza- 
tions, which have given their endorsement 
on his record as a member of the municipal 
bench. 

Election November 2 



T -»-o- u - u Tru'yTo'oTr8~o~u~8TruT^ 



Elect 
Peter R. MALONEY 

SHERIFF 




Years as a member of the San 
Francisco Police Department. 
He is eminently fitted to carry 
out the duties of Sheriff of the 
City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Election November 2 



i 



Re-Elect 

JUDGE MATTHEW 

BRADY 



1 




DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



° Election November 2 

a 
ZSLJLSLSLSiSLSLSLSLSiJLaJLSLSUIJL^ 



JUUL2 



****¥*¥¥*************♦*♦***♦*****+*♦♦* 



* 

* 
4- 



ARREST that old Mattress 

get an AIRFLEX 

You'll get deep, luxurious sleep on this sensitive, 
long-wearing mattress . . . and save money too! We 
sell direct to you at the manufacturers' price when 
you buy at our manufacturing store. Save from $5.55 
to #25.50. Mattresses from #10.95 to #49.50. Budget 
terms. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



**••••••••*+•*•••••••••**••**•*•**•••* 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks. 

Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants 
fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 




■ ■ ■■ 




SAN FRANCISCO 

ponce 

AND 



PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



OF THE STATE OF 



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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J. A. FRANKLIN, International President 

J. N. DAVIS, Asst. International President 

WM. E. WALTER, International Secretary-Treasurer 

L. A. FREEMAN, Editor-Manager of 

"The Boilermakers Journal" 



International Brotherhood 

of Boiler Makers, Iron Ship 

Builders and Helpers 

OF AMERICA 

Organized 1880 

Affiliated with the A.F.of L. 
LOCAL 39 



Compliments 



ALBERT'S 



The Friendly Store 




9th and McDonald 
Richmond 



Phones: Office — Hayward 1814 - Hayward 800 
Residence: 314 Soto Street - Phone Hayward 522 



L. K. PETERSON 
Drayman 



• • 



A and HATHAWAY STREETS 
HAYWARD - - CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 



CLAAR 



CHEVROLET CO. 

Repairs - Parts - U. S. Tires - Batteries 
Radios - Auto Insurance 



* 



Phone Richmond 385 
480 Twenty-third Street Richmond 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



Page 

The Journal Is 2 1 Years Old 3 

Living Heroes 5 

By Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Meeting ... 6 

Federal Criminal Statutes 8 

State-wide Revival of Safety "Urges" .... 8 

Police Responsibility in Highway Transportation 10 

Delinquency 12 

By Judge Theresa Mie\le 

NCPCO Association Meeting 13 

Picture Story of State Peace Officers' 

Convention •. 14 

Peninsula Police Officers' Association Meets . 15 

Editorial Page 16 

Swell Cooperation 17 

Adolph Juel In Alaska . . ' 18 

Southern Pacific's New Radio Program ... 19 

Try Your Hand at This List 20 

Our Police Department Allies 23 

The Candid Friend Says 25 

By the Editor 

Lieutenant Joseph P. Curtin 26 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Angelo J. Rossi 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 7.30 p.m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Ward G. Walkup, President 240 Second Street 

Hon. Walter McGovern 625 Market Street 

Hon. Wm. P. Wobber, Sr 412 Jessie Street 

Captain John A. Engler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors. Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 

Traffic Bureau Lt. Edward Pootel 635 Washington St. 

Acting Captain 
Dept. Sec'y Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 
Bur. of Personnel Lieut. George Healy Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence- 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau ofCriminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Central Capt. M. E. Mitchell....635 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence - 438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan. Drumm & Comm'l Sts. 

Residence -4075 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 
Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 
Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence - 2533 18th Avenue 

Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 
Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub-Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



wKeninTroMWe Call SUtter 20*20 

Wlien In DOUbt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL December, 1943 



Phone Richmond 1346 Phone OLympic 6547 

Compliments of 

LIBERTY MARKET 

Imported and Domestic Groceries RELIANCE RUBBER CO. 

105 PARK PLACE POINT RICHMOND, CALIF. m5 POWELL STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 9284 R. H. OW1NCS 

Bowl Your Cares Away 



SHOPRYTE GROCERY 

PHILLIP THOMPSON SAN PABLO BOWL 

(Under New Management) 
1919 PACIFIC AVENUE ALAMEDA, CALIF. | 63 | SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2462 LOCKED GARAGES 

SUNSET AUTO COURT 

DELUXE COTTAGES - REASONABLE RATES 



ZOMBIE VILLAGE 

Famous for 
RUM DRINKS . . . CHINESE and AMERICAN FOOD 



ON HIGHWAY 40 - SAN PABLO AVE.. 4'. MILES N. BERKELEY 

1 MILE SOUTH OF TOWN OF SAN PABLO 6485 SAN PAB LO AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



General Air Conditioning and Heating Co. 



Phone Richmond 569 GEO. P. NEWCOMB 



California Distributors: ART'S MOVING SERVICE 

GENERAL ELECTRIC - AIR CONDITIONING - HEATING 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION FURNITURE and PIANO MOVING 



1126 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

3959 PIEDMONT AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Phone Richmond 36 

GOLDEN STATE COMPANY, LTD. 



Large Closed Vans - State-wide Service 

4724 BISSELL AVENUE RICHMOND, CAL. 

Phone HIghgate 8768 J. D. NOBLE 

NOBLE COMPANY 

CONCRETE PLANTS 

1860 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

Continental Machine Works, Ltd. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 

ENDS THE QUEST FOR THE BEST 
SAN PABLO AND MACDONALD AVENUES RICHMOND, CALIF. 729 EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



DAY AND NIGHT 9:00 A.M. UNTIL 8:30 P.M. CHICO SAN FRANCISCO 

EACH THURSDAY AND FRIDAY JOHNSON TRUCK LINES 

Main Office RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

First National Bank of Richmond 

From: 

SAN FRANCISCO and EAST BAY POINTS, call ENterprise 1062 3 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA From OTHER POINTS, call Richmond 3011 



. ^ w - w,. ^t i ^ . THE CHEMICAL 8c PIGMENT CO. 

The California Wire Cloth Corporation 

Division of the Glidden Company 
vy-rr AVERS OF METAL Factories: Baltimore, Md.; Collinsville, 111.; Oakland, Calif. 

Warehouses in Principal Cities Throughout the U.S.A. 

Oakland San Francisco Los Angeles Seattle 766 FIFTIETH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



! San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXI 



DECEMBER, 1943 



No. 5 



Police Journal Twenty-One Years Old 



Last month the Police and Peace Officers' Journal 
was 21 years of age. It was in November, 1922, that this 
magazine was launched at the suggestion of the late Chief 
of Police Daniel J. O'Brien, under the name of 
"Douglas 2-0." 

Since that time the San Francisco Police Department 
has had two chiefs of police: William J. Quinn, who re- 
tired a little less than four years ago, and Charles W. 
Dullea, the present chief. Chief Quinn was appointed the 
successor of Chief Daniel J. O'Brien when illness forced 
his retirement. 

During the 2 1 years of the existence of the Police and 
Peace Officers' Journal, the editor has followed the 
policy set down in the initial issue of the Journal, to 
devote it to the interests of law enforcement, telling of the 
good things these men and women who make up this part 
of our civil life do in the performance of their duties, mix 
up a little humor and outside stories in its columns, present 
views of experts on police matters, and act as a clearing 
organ whereby members of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment as well as neighboring law-enforcement agencies 
might be kept in closer touch with each other, and by the 
exchange of ideas build up a better spirit of understanding 
and cooperation. 

When the first issue of this magazine saw the light of 
day James Rolph was mayor. He has since gone to his 
final rest revered and remembered for the splendid admin- 
istration he gave this city as well as governor of the 
State for over three years. 

The police commissioners were Theodore J. Roche, who 
served for a quarter of a century and rendered a service 
that left its imprint on the history of the Department; 
Dr. Thomas E. Shumate, who served over 20 years, and 
was one of the most sympathetic commissioners the board 
ever had; Jesse B. Cook, who was chief of police in 1908 
to 1910; and Andrew Mahony, shipping magnate, who 
was as enthusiastic over the welfare and success of the 
Department as you would want to see. The latter two 
former commissioners have passed on. 

Duncan Matheson was Captain of Detectives. He served 
with as high honors as any man could achieve during his 
membership in the Police Department. He was pressed 
into service as County Treasurer by the late Mayor Rolph, 



and served with distinction until his death last year. 

The Captains in bureau posts and station commands 
were: John J. Mooney, Richmond station; Henry Gleeson, 
Traffic; Eugene Wall, Ingleside; Henry O'Day, Potrero; 
John J. O'Meara, Mission; Marcus Anderson, Park; Ar- 
thur D. Layne, Central; Patrick Herlihy, Harbor; Charles 
Goff, Southern; Herbert J. Wright, Bush; Bernard Judge, 
Property Clerk; William J. Quinn, Chief Clerk to the 
Chief of Police. 

All these have answered the last roll call except Captain 
O'Day and Former Chief Quinn. 

Chief of Police Dullea was a corporal teamed up with 
Inspector Phil Lindecker and assigned to the Auto Detail 
under Inspector Arthur McQuaide, who long since has 
departed this earth. Captain of Inspectors Bernard Mc- 
Donald was a sergeant. 

Deputy Chief Michael Riordan was a corporal and was 
in charge of the License Bureau. He, like Chief Dullea, 
has gone a long way in the Department. 

Captain Bernard Judge was Property Clerk, a position 
now held by Captain John Wade. 

The Pawnshop Detail, now in charge of Lieutenant Sam 
Miller, was under Detective Sergeant Henry Powell, who 
passed away some years ago. 

The Robbery Detail was in charge of the late Sergeant 
George McLoughlin, it now being headed by Lieutenant 
James Malloy. 

The Burglary Detail had as its head Sergeant Richmond 
Tatham, retired, who now lives up near Santa Rosa. In- 
spector Richard O. Hughes now handles that job. 

Corporal Thomas Hoertkorn was heading the Pick- 
pocket Detail now in command of Lieutenant Charles 
Maher. 

There was no general works detail, and the Missing 
Persons Bureau, now in charge of Inspector Marvin 
Dowell, was just a hit and miss affair. 

Of the three policewomen then in the department, 
Kathlyn Sullivan, Katheryn Eisenhart and Katherine 
O'Connor, only Mrs. Sullivan remains and is in charge 
of the Big Sister Bureau. Kate O'Connor died a few 
months ago, and Mrs. Eisenhart took a pension some ten 
years ago. 

Lieutenant James Boland was in charge of the City 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



Prison, now under Lieutenant J. J. Casey. Lieutenant 
Boland has been dead several years. 

Captain Charles F. Skelly was secretary for the Board 
of Police Commissioners, a job that is now in the hands of 
Captain John Engler. Captain Skelly is at the present time 
executive secretary for Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, under a 
leave of absence from the Police Department. 

Radio was unknown to police 21 years ago, and the 
present two-way radio in this city has been one of the 
most forward steps taken by the Police Department. 

There are now about 1,300 police officers on the rolls. 
Twenty-one years ago there was some 200 less. 

Among the advancements made during this period is 
the development of the police academy, which in another 
year will be one of the leading in the United States and 
which during the past four years has turned out a large 
number of the finest trained youths that any police de- 
partment would want. 

The new shooting range nearing completion on the 
shores of Lake Merced, on the Skyline Boulevard, will 
be the finest in the United States, not excepting the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Identification, used for training its school 
recruits. 

The police have been granted two salary increases. 

The bureaus in the Inspectors Bureau, which 21 years 
ago was known as the Detective Bureau, have been in- 
creased and men trained for specialized work put in each. 

The number of automobiles and motorcycles have been 
increased manifold during the past two decades. 

There are three less police districts now than 21 years 
ago; the Bush was consolidated with Northern, Bayview 
and Western Addition divided up and abandoned as 
separate districts. 

Every section of San Francisco is patrolled by radio- 
equipped cars from the ten police stations in addition to 
details from the bureaus of the Bureau of Inspectors. 

The administrative end of the Police Department has 
been revamped by the voters, and we now have an As- 
sistant Chief, Michael Riordan, a Department Secretary, 
Captain John Engler; a Director of Communications, 
Lieutenant Frank Winters, who 21 years ago was on the 
day watch of the Detective Bureau; Supervising Captain 
of Districts, Captain Arthur L. Christiansen; Director of 
Personnel, Lieutenant George Healy; Director of Bureau 
of Special Service, Lieutenant Emmett Moore. 

The record of the San Francisco Police Department 
during the more than two decades is one that the city can 
well be proud of. There has been no gangsterism or 
rackets, no crime wave, and the bank robberies have been 
negligible. Those who committed offenses in this area have 
with but very few exceptions been apprehended and put 
where they belong. 

The growth of the metropolis has steadily increased, and 
the war has given an impetus to our population most 
astounding, but the numerical strength of the Police De- 
partment has not been kept pace with this increase. 

There are other details of improvement that has in- 
creased the efficiency of the Police Department, but space 
causes their ommission. 



We shall continue as long as the Journal remains under 
the present editorship to carry out the policies set forth 
in its initial edition, and strive as have always, to pro- 
mote the friendlinest feeling among our neighboring 
police and other law-enforcement officials. We've reached 
21 years, man's estate, and hope our readers have en- 
joyed our efforts during those years. 



HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM 
MAYOR ROSSI 

Members of the San Francisco Police Department : 
Greetings : 

The end of the second year of this World War II finds 
this nation more strongly united against its relentless foes, 




as never before, and we have witnessed great strides 
toward the victory that is assuredly ours. 

During the past year, many more members of our 
Police Department have joined the various fighting forces. 
You who remain in the ranks have given unstintedly of 
your talents and experience to assure for San Francisco 
safety and peace from the enemies from within. With this 
in mind it is but natural you will ever remain alert for 
any emergency that may arise, no matter how difficult it 
might be. Our Police Department has won the confidence 
of the people they serve, and they know you will face any 
dangers just as courageously as the members of our armed 
forces. 

I join with those who live in San Francisco in wishing 
for each one of you and your families all the blessings of 
the Holiday Season. 

Thanks for your excellent service to a grateful people. 
May God bless and preserve our City, State and Nation. 

Faithfully and sincerely yours, 

Angelo J. Rossi 

Mayor 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page y 



// 



LIVING HEROES 



// 



The following is a radio broadcast given over Station 
KSFO, under the direction of Austin Fenger, noted com- 
mentator, and by Deputy Chief Michael Riordan, and 
other members of the San Francisco Police Department: 

Austin Fenger: Deputy Chief Riordan, you have men- 
tioned that you would like to present to our radio audi- 




Deputy Chief Michael Riordan 

ence some of the living heroes in the San Francisco Police 
Department and as I understand it, you have two men 
here today who have performed meritorious acts in line 
of duty: 

Deputy Chief Michael Riordan: Yes, I have. To my 
mind, our police department has men of the finest fiber 
from the standpoint of faithfulness, loyalty, integrity and 
devotion to duty. From time immemorial poets have sung 
the praises of national and racial heroes; their accomplish- 
ments have come down to us in song and in story, and it is 
well that they do, because we gain inspiration, as well as 
courage and fortitude, from their accomplishments. For 
instance, who is it that is not inspired by the stories of the 
men who held the pass at Thermopylae, by Horatius at 
the bridge, and by the Charge of the Light Brigade. 

And right here in our midst we have men who without 
any flare of trumpets, patrol our highways and byways. 
They act silently, and they are generally alone. Yet they 
are always ready and willing to step in and guard the 
decent law-abiding citizen against the assault of the ban- 
dit, the thug and the maniac. They accept the challenge 
of duty with full knowledge of the risk assumed; that we 
have not had more fatal casualties is no doubt due to the 
training and experience which enable our men to guard 
themselves in tight places. Sometimes, of course, life must 
be sacrificed on the altar of duty, and our police depart- 
ment has its share of fatal casualties. Today I present to 



you two members of our Bureau of Inspectors, John R. 
Hunt and David W. Brady. 

On the afternoon of Thursday, Ferbuary 11, 1943, a 
telephone call was received at the Mission Police Station 
to the effect that some family trouble was taking place at 
a given address on 23 rd Street. Officer Ryan was on 
patrol in the police radio car and he responded. When he 
arrived at the address, he was met at the door by a woman 
who directed him to a given apartment. The woman in- 
formed the officer that the occupant, one Glen N. War- 
ner, was troublesome, but the officer nevertheless pro- 
ceeded to make his investigation, and upon entering the 
room, Warner, without challenge or notice, fired a rifle 
shot which took effect in the body of the officer. The offi- 
cer fell to the floor and Warner, who was no doubt insane, 
rushed over to the fatally wounded officer and fired a 
second shot through his head. The shots fired by Warner 
attracted attention and in a few second the police radio 
was broadcasting its message and assigning certain radio 
cars to investigate. However, there is a certain tradition 
in our department that all police officers on or off duty 
who learn of such happenings must respond to the scene 
immediately. While Inspectors Hunt and Brady were not 
specifically assigned to respond, they did hear the radio 
call and in compliance with our unwritten rule, they pro- 
ceeded immediately to the scene. I believe it would be 
well for you to have the Inspectors tell you the story in 
their own way. 

Austin Fenger: Supposing you, Inspector Hunt, take up 
from here on and tell us how you happened to go to the 
apartment where Warner, the man with the deadly rifle, 
was, what you saw, and what you did. 

Inspector John R. Hunt: Well, it was this way. Dave 
Brady and myself are attached to the burglary detail in 
the Bureau of Inspectors. We are assigned to a certain 
district in San Francisco and our work is to investigate 
reported burglaries for the purpose of apprehending the 
burglars and returning the stolen property to the owner. 
We were at Cortland avenue and Bayshore boulevard 
when we heard the radio flash: "Shooting at 3336 23rd 
street!" 

Nothing was stated about the killing of Officer Ryan, 
but we knew that wherever there is shooting there is 
trouble and the quicker we get there the better. Without 
asking any questions, we proceeded to the address given, 
and just as we got there Motorcycle Officer John M. 
Riewerts of the Traffic Bureau arrived on his motorcycle. 

As we were about the enter, a man pointed to a rear 
apartment and said: "Look out! A man with a rifle is in 
there and has done some shooting!" So far, we had not 
known of any killing, but Brady and Riewerts and myself 
decided we would quickly find out what it was all about. 
Brady opened the door, and as he did we were met with a 
volley of fire from Warner's rifle. 

One bullet went through my coat. We went into action 
(Continued on Page $5) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



BAY COUNTIES 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief John A. Greening, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



Clinton T. Duffy, warden of San Quentin, was host 
to the members of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation held at San Quentin Prison December 9. It was as 
fine a meeting, from the standpoint of entertainment, con- 
structiveness and goodwill, as any held in the history of 




Clinton T. Duffy 
Warden of San Quentin 

the association, and some two hundred sat down to a 
splendid luncheon prepared and served by the inmates of 
the largest penal institution in this country. 

Chief John Greening, President of the association, pre- 
sided and, before the luncheon was served, presented War- 
den Duffy, who formally welcomed the visitors and an- 
nounced a fine program for the occasion. The prison or- 
chestra, which has a high rating among radio listeners, the 
choir of inmates, and the ace soloists and a monologist 
who would make a lot of outside professionals look sick, 
then proceeded to put forth and they received applause 
that indicated they had made a hit with the audience, 
among whom there were officers who had put some of 
these boys where they were. 

But from the sincere effort of the musicians, the singers 
and the others who participated in the program there was 
not the slightest expression of resentment, and the master 
of ceremonies stressed the remarks of Warden Duffy that 
the boys were highly pleased to perform for the peace 
officers. 

At the conclusion of the luncheon, Warden Duffy 
described the program of San Quentin. He said among 
other things that there was no coddling of prisoners. Each 



man who came there under a court sentence was told he 
was expected to do a day's work, and that he would be 
given a chance to study to improve himself for the life that 
would follow his release from prison. From the remarks 
of the Warden it was evident that most of those sent there 
catch on very quickly and soon see the advantage of the 
splendid program of revamping their lives and giving 
them a chance to earn an honest living when they take 
their place in the land a free man. 

The warden said it was his and the prison administra- 
tion justice to bring about a reformation among the in- 
mates so that when they are released they would cause no 
more trouble to the peace officers of this state. 

He told of how the educational system had been ad- 
vanced from a few prison inmate instructors to a force of 
educators hired by the state. He said that 25 of these in- 
structors in the Junior College of Marin County are 
teaching the prisoners how to work and how to fit them- 
selves in many lines of endeavor. 

In the past 1 3 months the prisoners have made $ 1 ,600,- 
000 worth of war materials, including submarine nets, 
loading devices, serving trays and reclaiming many tons of 
wire and rubber from the ships wrecked in Pearl Harbor, 
when the Japs copped a sneak two years ago. The wire 
from one of these battleships, he stated, would furnish 
enough to wire a city of 4,500 people. His boys 
have donated 1,300 pints of blood plasma and have, from 
their own funds, purchased during the third war bond 
drive, $100,200 war bonds and stamps. 

He informed the audience that 900 inmates are taking 
courses in the night schools, after they have finished their 
daily toil, and this keeps the boys engaged from 5:30 to 
10:30 each week-day night. 

He asked the peace officers present that when one of 
these inmates comes out, gets a job, to help that man and 
not to kick him. 

At the conclusion of the Warden's remarks, President 
Greening read messages from the Mayor and City Man- 
ager of Berkeley, who were kept home by the storm, and 
from Chief Charles Dullea and Captain of Inspector Ber- 
nard McDonald, who were unable to come because of a 
meeting with the Police Commission, and he stated In- 
spector John Shillings would act as secretary, being as- 
sisted by four past presidents of the association: Chief L. 
E. Jones, Thomas P. Burke, John J. Harper and Donald 
Wood. He also appointed this quartet as a nominating 
committee, of which he would be an ex-officio member, 
to present a list of names for the election of officers next 
month, when a president, vice president and secretary- 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



treasurer will be selected. 

Chief Greening told the officers present of the use of 
police two-radio stations in the nine bay counties by the 
war officials and that he has instructions with codes for 
the use of all licensed stations. Berkeley will be the point 
of reception and distribution of emergency broadcasts 
affecting war conditions. 

Warden Duffy was asked to introduce the speaker of 
the day, Julian Alco, of the Board of Prison Directors, 
and who is recognized throughout the land as one of the 
most far-seeing prison officials ever to taken up prison 
work. 

Director Alco, he stated, took a recess from extra duties 
imposed by the Folsom Prison investigation to make this 
appearance. 

The speaker paid high tribute to Warden Duffy, and to 
James Adam, acting warden at Folsom, whom he said was 
doing a mighty fine job, working from 15 to 18 hours a 
day to get the Folsom mess straightened out. 

Then he briefly reviewed the history of California 
prisons. In the early days under Mexican rule each land 
grant had its own calaboose. Then, as the state grew, two 
boats were used as prisons, sailing about San Francisco 
Bay to as far as Vallejo. The prisoners were farmed out 
to the ranchers, and if they were treated right they stayed. 
If they got poor food and treatment, they just left and, 
with no method of communication or automobile, very 
few were ever recaptured. 

So when California was voted into the Union it was 
seen that a site should be selected for a penitentiary and 
two were submitted — San Quentin and Goat Island. The 
former got the decision. 

Then the speaker went into the subject of his lecture, 
"Prisons of the World." Material for the address was 
gathered on a world tour made in 1939, and trips taken to 
Mexico and South America to make surveys. 

With the largest murder rate in the world, Mexico 
maintains a federal-operated prison, housing 1,100 prison- 
ers, men and women. The two sexes work together. 
Women prisoners keep their children until they are two 
years old, and birth of children in the prison is frequent 
because a man prisoner may be visited by his wife every 
week for two hours if he has a good record, and the same 
applies to a female prisoner who may be visited by her 
husband. The Mexican government thinks this is the best 
method to combat degeneracy. 

He told of another prison in Mexico that had but 12 
guards, six for day service and six for night. He was 
amazed, he said, and asked how they kept the men in the 
place. He was shown a moat that went around the prison 
and concreted rising set up at intervals in the moat which 
had vicious dogs waiting for a would-be escape. 

He said the finest prison he ever visited was in Brazil, 
and the most medievial at Santiago, Chili. 

Then he took his listeners to Europe, where he had 
more trouble in getting into one or two than the inmates 
had in getting out. 

In Valencia, Spain, he found a most interesting prison 
fashioned on the Joliet, 111., plan. Most of the prisoners 



are political, and they are well treated, because the outs 
realize that a change of government might put them where 
the prisoners they were caring for are. He said here the 
women's prison elaborated on the family phase of Mexico, 
as when a woman is committed she takes her entire off- 
sping up to 7 years. This presents a problem that calls for 
child care and education, which is met in a way. 

The only person he met in Spain whom he had formerly 
known, he said, was a prisoner in a Spanish penitentiary 
who was formerly an inmate of San Quentin, and Mr. 
Alco set his sentence, as the Spanish prisoner recounted. 

Director Alco visited San Gimignano and Voltarra 
prisons in Italy. The former was built in the 12th cen- 
tury, and the prisoners get a bath and shave once a week 
and each has his own cell. 

In the latter the men do all their time to which they are 
sentenced, no paroles or time off for good behavior. The 
inmates get but one meal a day. 

France, the speaker said, maintains the silent system a 
Moulin. 

Norway, Sweden and Finland, according to the speaker, 
are far ahead of other European prisons for the care of the 
prisoners and for required education after committment. 

In Estonia, after much difficulty, and with the assistance 
of his 17-year-old daughter, he finally got into the prison 
built by Catherine the Great of Russia. This was the 
grimest prison he saw on his entire trip. 

England has some grim features in its penitentiaries, 
Director Alco said. Scotland, he said, stressed religion in 
their prisons, having chapels of the three leading denomi- 
nations erected in each. 

In Ireland he found the best prisons in the British 
Islands, they stacking up favorably with San Quentin. In 
Ireland they have two sets of guards. Those in the inside 
are so designated, while the Army furnished the protec- 
tionary measures on the outside. 

After he got back from his trip, Director Alco seems to 
be convinced that this state has made more advance in the 
treatment and rehabilitation of men sentenced to penal 
servitude than any place he visited. He was given a rous- 
ing cheer at the conclusion and all present felt they had 
indeed spent a profitable time in hearing this masterly 
address. 

The following signed cards for the meeting : 

San Quentin — Warden Clinton Duffy; Secretary 
Thomas Cheetham; Dr. E. David Akers; Chris A. R. 
Todd, Assistant Warden; Executive Secretary Charles B. 
White; Captain of Yards J. H. Fletcher; Dr. D. G. 
Schmidt, prison psychiatrist; Louis Carillo; E. D. Zulrich; 
Dr. Alex Miller, prison physician; Rabbi Irving Coffee, 
prison chaplain; and Assistant Warden of Folsom Prison 
James Adam. 

San Rafael— Sheriff Walter B. Sellmer; Chief Frank 
Kelly; Sergeant C. J. Chiesa; Officer Amos Foster; Au- 
ditor W. B. Wright; Assessor G. W. Hall; Harold W. 
Elliott, State Board of Equalization. 

Sausalito — Mayor Webb H. Mahaffy; Chief James 
Doyle; Captain Cornelius J. McCann; Special Officer K. 
(Continued on Page 3 1 ) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



Federal Criminal Statutes 



Because the Federal Bureau of Investigation has re- 
ceived many requests for a list of the type of criminal 
cases over which it has jurisdiction, Director John Edgar 
Hoover has prepared a resume of such cases, and Chief 
Special Agent 7\[. J. L. Pieper has furnished the same to 
Police and Peace Officers' Journal, which is pre- 
sented below: 

Bank Robbery 

1 . The bank must be a national bank, a member of the 
Federal Reserve system, an insured bank of the Federal 




J. Edgar Hoover 

Deposit Insurance Corporation, or one organized or 
operating under laws of the United States. 

2. The property, money or anything of value must be 
feloniously taken from a person or the presence of a 
person, and the taking, or attempt, must be accom- 
panied by force and violence, or putting in fear. 

3. The property, money, etc., must belong to, or be in the 
care, custody, control or management of the bank. 

Bank Burglary and Larceny 

1. Same requirements as to membership in Federal Re- 
serve system, etc. 

2. Entrance into a bank or building used in whole or in 
part as a bank with the intent to commit therein any 
felony or larceny, or to taking or carrying away any 
property or other thing of value. 

3. The property, money, etc., must be in the care, custody, 
control of the bank. 

Extortion — Essential Elements 
1 . The intent to extort from any person (or corporation) 
any money or other thing of value coupled with de- 
positing in the United States mail any written or printed 
matter containing any threat: 

(a) Containing any demand or request for ransom 
or reward for the release of a kidnapped person. 

(b) To kidnap any person. 



(c) To injure the person or property of the addresses 
or of another. 

Jurisdiction 
To avoid duplication with the Post Office Department, 
the F.B.I, has jurisdiction over the following types of 
cases : 

1. Mailing of threats to injure the person or property of 
any person. 

2. Mailing of threats to kidnap any person. 

3. Mailing of any demand or request for ransom or reward 
for the release of any kidnapped person. 

Unlawful Flight to Avoid Prosecution 

1 . Movement between states with intent either 

(a) To avoid prosecution for murder, kidnapping, bur- 
glary, robbery, mayhem, rape, assault with a dan- 
gerous weapon, or extortion coupled with threats 
of violence or attempt to commit any of the above 
under the laws of the place from which the person 
flees, or 

(b) To avoid giving testimony in any criminal pro- 
ceedings in such place in which the commission 
of a felony is charged. 

The following facts must be shown before the F.B.I. 
can assume jurisdiction: 

1 . Facts must show it is reasonably certain the subject has 
traveled in interstate commerce. 

2. It must be shown a process has been issued instituting 
state prosecution for one of the crimes mentioned in the 
act in the case of flight to avoid prosecution, or that a 
state criminal proceeding charging commission of a 
felony has been instituted in the case of flight to avoid 
testifying, and the witness was under subpoena prior 
to fleeing. 

3. The United States Attorney must authorize prosecu- 
tion; this must be done prior to the issuance of a war- 
rant for the subject's arrest by the F.B.I. 

Deserters 
Citation Section 1578, Title 10, United States Code, 
gives power to any civil officer having authority under the 
laws of the United States or any state, to arrest summarily 
a deserter from the military, the Navy or Marine Corps 
services of the United States. 

Theft of Government Property 

1 . Must be shown the property belong to the United 
States or to a corporation in which the United States is 
a stockholder, or that it is being manufactured under 
contract for the War or Navy Department. 

2. That it was taken and carried away by the subject. 

3. That the subject took and carried away the property 
with the intention of converting it to his own use or 
the use of another. 

Receiving and Illegal Possession 

1. In that the property belongs to the United States. 

2. That it had been embezzled or stolen by someone other 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



than the subject. 

3. That the subject without lawful right received, con- 
cealed or possessed such property, knowing it to have 
been stolen or embezzled. 

4. That the subject received, concealed, etc., such property 
with intention of converting it to his own use. 
Section 86 covering purchase or receipt in pledge of 

property furnished by the United States to anyone subject 
to military or Naval law or to veterans maintained at 
Veterans' Administration Facilities: 

1. That the property was furnished by the United States. 

2. That the subject purchased or received such property 
pledge. 

3. That the subject had knowledge or reason to believe 
that the property had been furnished by the United 
States under a clothing allowance to a soldier or other 
person, or that the property had been taken from the 
possession of the United States. 

Illegal Wearing of Uniform 

1. Wearing a duly prescribed uniform or any distinctive 
part thereof, or similar thereto, of the United States 
Army, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. 

2. An intent to deceive or mislead. 

3. Wearing any Naval, military or other official uniform 
of a foreign government with which the United States 
is at peace. 

4. Wearing, manufacturing or selling any medal of honor 
or other decoration prescribed by the Secretary of War. 

5. Without authority. 

Impersonation 

1. With intent to defraud. 

2. The impersonation of United States Government em- 
ployee or an officer or employee of a United States 
Government owned or controlled corporation. 

3. Taking upon oneself to act in the roll of an impersona- 
tor; demanding a thing of value; obtaining a thing of 
value. 

Theft from Interstate Shipment 
Possible Violations — Those dealing with the breaking 
of the seal, the entry and larceny from a railroad car, 
truck, depot, etc., containing an interstate or foreign 
shipment, with intent to commit larceny: 

1. The unlawful breaking of the seal of any railroad car 
containing interstate or foreign shipments. 

2. The entering of such car. 

3. The stealing or obtaining by fraud of goods being 
shipped in interstate or foreign commerce, including 
baggage. 

4. The buying, receiving or possessing of such goods know- 
ing it to have been stolen. 

5. The subsequent interstate transportation of such goods 
knowing it to have been stolen. 

Kidnapping 

1 . A person must have been unlawfully seized, decoyed, 
kidnapped or abducted and 

2. The person kidnapped must be transported in interstate 
or foreign commerce and 

3. The person must be held for ransom or reward. 



National Motor Vehicle Theft Act 

1 . That the motor vehicle had been stolen. 

2. That the motor vehicle was transported in interstate 
or foreign commerce. 

3. (a) That the person transporting the motor vehicle 

knew it to have been stolen, or 
(b) That the person receiving, concealing, selling, etc., 
of the motor vehicle knew it to have been stolen. 
White Slave Traffic Act 

1. That a woman or girl was transported in interstate or 
foreign commerce. 

2. That the purpose of the transportation of such woman 
or girl was prostitution, debauchery or other immoral 
purposes. 

STATEWIDE REVIVAL OF "SAFETY 
FIRST" URGED 

Revival of the old-time slogan, "Safety First," and 
overhauling of safety measures taught in the '20s to meet 
present wartime traffic conditions and the alarming in- 
crease of accidents, were urged yesterday by the California 
State Automobile Association in an appeal to the public 
to exercise self-protection against traffic perils. 

The appeal followed President Roosevelt's call on the 
nation last week to pay greater heed to "the ground rules 
for safety." Recent reports to the Automobile Association 
on comparative statistics of war dead and traffic dead, 
through the month of June, 1943, follow: 

U. S. war dead since Pearl Harbor, 15,123 
Li. S. traffic dead in same period, 40,000 

The report indicated that the 1943 traffic death toll will 
approximate 24,000; a 40 per cent reduction over 1941, 
hut only 1 f per cent less than the 1942 total of 28,000. 
This despite a 2') per cent reduction in travel from 1942 
to 1943. 

Accordingly, the Automobile Association suggested that 
the old principals of "Safety First" campaigns, waged in 
the early days of motoring and which greatly reduced 
traffic accidents at that time, should be dusted off, stream- 
lined to meet present wartime needs, and applied to re- 
education on traffic hazards and safety measures. 

Traffic accident increases, the Association contends, are 
attributable to the American public being forced to act, 
more and more, as its own traffic officer as police depart- 
ments are reduced by wartime demands of the armed 
forces. 

It is also pointed out that the pedestrian — fast becom- 
ing the No. 1 wartime traffic victim — "has been lulled 
into a false sense of security of traffic's potential dangers 
and today, more than ever, needs a thorough re-education 
in self-protection." 




Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



Police Responsibility in Highway 

Transportation 

Address by E. Raymond Cato, Chief California Highway Patrol — California Peace Officers Second War Time 
Conference, Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, October 11-13, 1943. 



Conditions developing in California since 1941 have 
gradually brought about a complete change and new field 
of activity in traffic control and the functioning of the 
traffic officer. 

In discussing this subject matter I shall spenk directly 
from our experience in the California Highway Patrol, 




Chief E. Raymond Cato 

which we believe are not unlike, to any great extent if 
any, the ordinary functioning of the traffic officer in any 
municipality in this state. Therefore, any remarks on the 
subject matter must be considered reflecting generally ex- 
periences by the city police of California. 

On December 7, 1941, we had just about reached our 
peak in traffic density, and the concentration of this traffic 
was particularly noticeable in the area adjacent to the 
Pacific Ocean, spreading over approximately 1,000 miles 
of coastline in what is termed the theater of military oper- 
ation and a potential combat zone. 

In California it is estimated that there are now approxi- 
mately 3,000 war industries and several hundred military 
and naval establishments, which have increased our popu- 
lation materially. In fact, a 21 per cent increase was expe- 
rienced in the ten-year period 1930-1940, bringing the 
population to 6,970,387, a numerical increase of 1,230,- 
136. This increase has been passed in the last three years. 
According to all reliable estimates of population, we have 
now passed the seven and half million number. There is 
maintained a steady flow of traffic distributed over the 



24 hours of the day, comparable to the peak traffic of 
1939, although approximately 35 per cent below the 
1941 maximum. 

It is observed that there has been a decided decrease 
in the Sunday, holiday and recreational traffic. This dis- 
tribution of traffic flow over the 24 hours of the day has 
caused a decentralization of assignment and a redistribu- 
tion of manpower previously unexperienced but now 
made necessary to meet the continued tendencies of migra- 
tion of population and war activities. 

Much has been said and done in our effort to conserve 
rubber, this most vital item in highway transportation. It 
is realized now more than ever before that highway trans- 
portation is the most important extension of the produc- 
tion line in our all-out effort to win this war, and without 
rubber transportation would fail. 

In California's 5,5 33 populace communities there are 
1,868 that have no means of transportation to serve them 
other than the automobile. This is in excess of one-third 
of the communities in the state and represents approxi- 
mately 5 per cent of the population as computed in 1940. 

In the all-out effort to win this war, which we are all 
sincerely exerting our utmost to accomplish, it is found 
increasingly necessary to more restrict and control the 
movement of the automobile for economic reasons. It is 
estimated by those who have made it a study, that in 
excess of 70 per cent of the defense workers in California 
ride to and from their places of employment in an auto- 
mobile, and these cars must continue to roll. 

The speed of these vehicles, and of every vehicle on the 
highway, has been set by National edict not to exceed 35 
miles per hour in an effort of conservation, all of which 
adds to the wartime problems of the traffic officer. Restric- 
tion of load also has been placed on the commercial vehicle 
in the major instances in harmony with California law. 

Recently statements by apparently high officials, al- 
though unconfirmed, relative to the early plentiful supply 
of rubber, followed with announcements of the discon- 
tinuance of the Aircraft Service warning and a modifica- 
tion of the diminution regulations on the Pacific Coast, 
have caused a decided increase in the speed of the vehicle 
and also an increase numerically in traffic, all of which 
have brought about more serious crashes and resultant 
casualties on the highway. 

While there are yet no statutes in this state that support 
the speed edict, cooperative plans are in operation, mutu- 
ally effected, whereby the motorist wantonly disregarding 
the 3 5 -mile per hour maximum speed is warned of his con- 
duct an a written report submitted to the Office of Price 
Administration for their consideration in disciplining the 
motorist, either on request for renewal of gasoline ration 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



or suspension or revocation of his gasoline privileges. We 
find this a formidable weapon in encouraging a compliance 
with the regulations which otherwise would not be accom- 
plished. 

There is a general cooperative effort on the part of all 
peace officers to enforce reduced speed by educational 
means which is evidenced by the great reduction in, and 
the severity of, accidents in California since the reduced 
speed of vehicles has been in effect. Some would attribute 
this reduction to the decrease in highway traffic. Past ex- 
perience has shown that light traffic is more deadly than 
is heavy and congested traffic. This refutes the idea and 
we are confident that the reduction in highway casualties 
is principally the result of reduced speed. 

It is true that because of our rubber shortage, tires are 
becoming gradually worse and do cause some accidents. 
While it is the duty of the traffic officer to inspect vehicles 
for safety reasons, and he should call to the attention of 
the motorist faulty and defective tires, the necessity of 
transportation coupled with the inability to secure good 
rubber has practically nullified this activity on the part 
of the officers. 

Another wartime problem of the traffic officer experi- 
enced during this period of population growth in Califor- 
nia is an influx of motorists with vehicles of all descrip- 
tions. Many are barely capable of their own locomotion 
yet are required to drag heavy trailers with the entire 
personal effects, plus family, from job to job over the 
highways of this state, causing traffic congestion, unneces- 
sary delays in the movement of strategic and vital wartime 
materials, and in many instances serious traffic crashes. 

The traffic officer today, while mindful of his duties as 
such, and experienced in selective enforcement — an inno- 
vation in traffic control — has learned to do many duties 
which may be termed extraneous to his regular and rou- 
tine responsibilities. 

In recalling some of these items with which we are 
most familiar, anti-sabotage activities by every peace offi- 
cer is the most important in our all-out war effort. While 
we have not experienced to this date any great sabotage 
of properties or materiel in California, nevertheless the 
possibilities of such are ever-present. 

The vital war factories, our water systems, our power, 
fuel, gasoline and gas, the long pipelines, our deep and 
high-pressure oil wells, the refineries, our great grain fields, 
and our lumber resources all must be protected from dam- 
age and destruction at all times. 

Our principal arteries of transportation, particularly 
our bridges, are under the ever-alert eye of a traffic officer. 
Our traffic officers today are expediting, not only the 
movement of military personnel, the motor marches with 
mechanized equipment, but also the shipment of strategic 
and vital war materials which must be moved in safety and 
with expedition from point to point. 

Control rooms with the vital information currently 
kept on every highway, bridge and road in this state, are 
of inestimable value to our national defense. These are 
maintained and used by our traffic officer in aid to our 
military and is an indispensable service, both to our armed 



forces and in our administration of traffic control. 

Communications systems, heretofore felt adequate for 
local use and traffic control, necessarily have been aug- 
mented to the point where they are a most valuable asset 
in the protection of the Pacific Coast and as an indispen- 
sable item of police service. The two-way radio systems 
afford ready communications in emergency and its con- 
tinued operation is safeguards against loss of power by the 
installation of auxiliary gas motors which would be used 
should the power fail. 

The traffic officer today finds himself in a new field — 
that of aiding in investigation of vital matters, a safeguard 
to our national existence — in aid to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. Although it may be a small matter and only 
a link in the great chain of evidence necessary to com- 
plete a case of moment in our national defense, yet he is 
vitally concerned in this cooperative effort. 

The juvenile delinquency problem is one ever-present 
in police activities, but one which has been greatly in- 
creased in recent months where small bands of juveniles — 
2, 3, 5, and as many as 7 — are found by members of the 
Patrol operating in stolen automobiles which they have 
succeeded in alluding the police in, in some instances for 
months, and continue to run on fuel which they steal 
from the service stations and in many instances from the 
farmers' supplies pilfered through the late hours of night 
on the ranches throughout the state. This activity may 
be the beginning of a criminal career which gradually de- 
velops into more serious crime. 

A recent case of interest brought to my attention, 
where highway patrolmen picked up a stolen care with 
seven youths, ranging from 14 to 17 years old, the juvenile 
authorities would only hold the driver of the vehicle and 
the one who admitted being present when the theft of the 
vehicle was made. Yet the other five all had guilty knowl- 
edge, knowing that they were riding in a stolen automo- 
bile and had participated in gasoline thefts. One of these 
youths had been in for rape previously, yet they were 
not considered delinquent by the authorities and were 
released. 

Previously to 1942 the traffic officer was continuously 
extolling the motorist to build up his lighting for safety 
in commensuration with permissible speed. In our national 
emergency it has been found necessary to curtail this 
lighting. The diminution, pursuant to Public Proclama- 
tions No. 10 and No. 12 issued by the Western Defense 
Command, applicable along the coastal area has brought 
another problem and other job to the traffic officer which 
he is handling very well. Although we must admit that 
while the diminution is affording a protection to our ship- 
ping at sea and a handicap to our enemy, it has been the 
cause of increased highway accidents. Motorists fail to 
realize the hazard they create when driving above a speed 
commensurate with the lighting of the vehicle. In other 
words, driving "over their headlights" has brought many 
to grief on the highways in the coastal dimout area. Re- 
cently Proclamation No. 19, issued by the Western De- 
fense Command, has greatly modified diminution to 
(Continued on Page 39) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



DELINQUENCY 

By Judge Theresa Meikle, San Francisco Superior Court 



As extensions of the work of justice and charity in the 
City and County of San Francisco, our social agencies 
have been vigilant, dexterous and persevering. Our police 
department has been unique in its spotting of young new- 
comers on the city's streets, detecting from whence they 
come and whither they are going. But the overwhelming 









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Judge Theresa Meikle 

change in conditions and the unparalleled influx of the 
teen-age girls — I might say, the over-patriotic teen-age 
girls — into our midst has brought on problems that are 
sharing the news headlines with nothing less important 
than the war gains and losses these days. 

Our Big Sister Bureau and its staff of special women 
officers have been doing remarkable work in heading off 
many of these young women from becoming roamers, 
wanderlusts and bar habitues. But the task has gotten 
beyond them also. 

Some observers and commentators, in a position to 
know, feel that unless delinquency among our youth is 
stemmed, Americanism will be no more. It is well known 
through history that when a nation's womanhood falls, the 
nation falls. These may seem to be harsh reflexions, but in 
the last few days no less than five mothers have telephoned 
to me that they would like assistance in finding their 
daughters, each of them under eighteen years of age. 

The situation is serious. The causes are well known to 
us. The solutions? As one well-known woman columnist 
said recently, that will require more than presence at a 
meeting and writing out of a check. Each and every 
woman in our community must do something about this, 
and do it quickly, keeping right after the subject until the 
battle is won. If our men who are sacrificing everything 
for our safety can't come home to a womanhood that is 



their ideal, it is the fault of us who have the guidance 
and guardianship of our youth entrusted to us. 

As I have indicated, so much has already been said and 
written on this distasteful and terrible subject of delin- 
quency, I will ask you to bear with me only to contem- 
plate what we must do toward its prevention. Now, you 
well know I am coming right down to the root of the 
trouble: The delinquent parents! In some states they are 
being arrested and jailed. That will not immediately be 
our solution, but that will come, too, if more gentle, or 
less drastic, measures are not adopted and lived up to. 

Let me reiterate, before I state these measures, that San 
Francisco is not a leader in the statistics of child crime; 
in fact, in a national survey of cities of its size, it ranked 
second lowest in number of youthful delinquents, although 
taking the country as a whole there was an increase of 
64 per cent in the crimes committed by girls under 21 
years of age. This is generally attributed to the break- 
down of family ties; the home broken by any number of 
causes; parents working irregular hours; increased pros- 
perity among these youthful workers, who have not fin- 
ished their schooling in many instances; and, even where 
parents are supposedly at the head of their homes, their 
laxity or indifference as to what their teen-age children 
are doing. 

So, for the corrective measures : 

1. The curfew, definitely; and the appointment of spe- 
cial officers to escort the rebellious to their homes. Re- 
peated offense, then deal sharply with the parents or 
guardians. 

2. All social agencies working together with the police 
department, as a united front, so that there will be greater 
co-ordination and cooperation, regardless of overlapping 
of interest and service. There is no time for argument 
and discussion; there must be action by all the agencies, 
and more tolerance among them. 

3. Courteous and patient listening by every public offi- 
cial, every officer, social worker, or representative of any 
agency, when a parent approaches for advice, or a com- 
plaint is registered regarding any youth, so that his or her 
case may be taken in hand promptly. 

4. Continuation of the splendid work of the Children's 
Court, and a spreading interest in foster homes; coopera- 
tion with foster parents and rendering of every possible 
assistance to them. 

J. Enlargement of the idea of the School for Parents; 
that it comprehend all parents desirous of direction, and 
not only those "sentenced" to it because of infractions 
and violations. 

6. Upon placement of a child in a foster home, a social 

worker should immediately contact the child's former 

home to ascertain the cause of the break-up of the family 

unit, and to start in motion the consummate aids for 

( Continued on Page 40 ) 



December, J943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

George K. Burton, President 
Herman J. Schwandt, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at Sprigg's 
Inn at Martinez, November 11, 1943. Our host, Geo. K. 
Burton, had arranged for a lovely chicken dinner. Pictures 
of the group were taken at 12:45 P.M., and luncheon was 




Geo. K. Burton 

served at 12:55 P.M. Pres. Burton called the meeting to 
order at 1:40 P.M., and introduction of members and 
visitors followed. Minutes of the preceding meeting were 
read and approved. 

A letter from APCO was read regarding the change of 
our title to Northern California Chapter. After much 
discussion it was decided that we retain our present title 
and make no changes for the time being inasmuch as we 
have no members on the administrative board of APCO. 
Motion by McMurphy, seconded by Hossack. Carried. 

Discussion by Lewis, Stancil, and Hartnett on transmit- 
ters in privately-owned cars. The radio must be discon- 
nected so that it cannot be used when the car is being 
used other than for police work. 

Sheriff Hogin of Modesto, Stanislaus County, requests 
a clearance for a construction permit on 39380 Key A.M. 
Motion by McMurphy, seconded by Bogardus. Carried. 

Sheriff Herb Forward, Oroville, Butte County, requests 
a clearance for a construction permit on 39380 Key F.M. 
Motion by Harrington, seconded by Lucido. Carried. 

Sheriff L. A. Braden, Quincy, Plumas County, requests 
clearance for a construction Permit on 39380 Key F.M. 
Motion by Harrington, seconded by Lucido. Carried. 



Lieutenant Commander Robert Lee St. Claire of the 
Naval Shore Patrol, San Francisco Area, gave us a few 
words on Shore Patrol duty and communication equip- 
ment used by them under the jurisdiction of the local 
Police and Sheriffs' Offices. 

Major Kenneth Peck, Provost Marshall of Camp 
Stoneman, also gave us a few words on Military Police 
Work and Police Radio Work. 

An application for membership was received from Leo 
Reese of the Sheriff's Office at Lakeport; as well as an 
application from Anthony J. Morgenthal of the Oakland 
Police Department. Both applications were okehed by 
the Board of Directors and accepted. 

President Burton appointed James M. Lewis to the 
APCO National Planning Board to represent this or- 
ganization. 

At 3:00 P.M. there was a general discussion of re- 
flectors. 

At 3:20 Lucido and Ruys showed us some war pic- 
tures furnished by the Signal Corps of San Francisco. 

Harrington asked for the next meeting at Redwood 
City, and his offer was accepted. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 P.M. 

Members present: Geo. K. Burton, Herman J. 
Schwandt, E. S. Naschke, A. J. Silva, Jim M. Ruys, 
Merrill LeBoeuf, Dominick P. Lucido, Chas. B. McMur- 
phy, Henri Kirby, Edward Bertola, Donald T. Wood, Leo 
M. Reese, Mott Brunton, Frank E. Winters, H. W. 
Heiwinkel, Ray Gada, Wm. Stancil, Herb Becker, W. H. 
Harrington, Walter Wisnom, John J. Hartnett, Manuel 
Trinta, J. D. Hossack, C. H. Cross, A. J. Morgenthal, 
Homer Jones, Ivan Hudson, James M. Lewis, Frank J. 
Matjasich, Henry Bogardus. 

Visitors present: Carrol Messier, Sheriff's Office, Mar- 
tinez; Captain J. K. Alexander, Signal Corps, San Fran- 
cisco; Major Kenneth Peck, Provost Marshall, Camp 
Stoneman, Pittsburgh; Lieutenant Commander Robert Lee 
St. Claire, Naval Shore Patrol, San Francisco; O. E. 
Sober, Shore Patrol, San Francisco; Bob Mason, Tech., 
U. S. Army, McClelland Field, California; Geo. W. Han- 
sen, Inspector of Police, Piedmont; S. D. Wood, Police 
Department, Redwood City. 

The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at Crystal 
Springs Country Club, San Mateo County, December 9, 
1943. Luncheon was arranged for by our host, W. H. 
Harrington. The lunch was very good, and there was a lot 
(Continued on Page 34) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



PICTURE STORY OF SPOAOC CONVENTION 

A page of pictures ta\en by a corps of photographers under the direction of Chief Agent 7\[. /. L. Pieper, FBI San 
Francisco, at the convention of the State Peace Officers' Association of California held this year in the Fairmont 

Hotel, and which was largely attended. 





PRESIDENT GIVEN ANNUAL REPORT 

Chief Alexander McAllister delivering his annua! message. 

At his right are Chief Dullea and Hugh Clegg. Deputy 

Director FBI. 



DELEGATES ADDESSES BY CHIEF DULLEA 
Chief Charles W. Dullea welcoming the members to San Fran- 
cisco for their annual convention. At his left are Chief McAllister 
and Mosignor Collins. 




GOV. WARREN TALKS WITH FBI LEADERS 
T^at ]. L. Pieper, chief of FBI in San Francisco District; Governor 
Earl Warren; and R. B. Hood, head of FBI in the L. A. District. 




trft'ttf 






AT LUNCHEON GIVEN BY FBI 

President McAllister; Chief Harold A. Vogelsang, Vice President, 

Otis Bohn. Chief Agent California Packing Co.; Chief Fred 

Moore of Montery; H. C. Van Pelt. Assistant SAC, FBI, at 

luncheon on Opening Day. 



PENINSULA CHIEFS OF POLICE AT MEET 

Left to right: John ]. Harper, Burlmgame; /. Farrell. Atherton; 

C. L. Collins. Redu'ood City; Thomas Bur\e, San Mateo; William 

Maher, San Bruno; Louis Belloni, South City; ]. A. Cost, FBI 

special agent assigned to that area. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2 5 



Peninsula Police Officers 1 Association 



The November meeting of the Peninsula Police Officers' 
Association was held in the Redwood Hotel, Redwood 
City, at noon of November 17. 

After partaking of a fine luncheon, the President, Chief 
W. J. Wisnom, of Hillsborough, called the meeting to 




Chief W. J. Wisnom of Hillsborough 

order. Sergeant Jack Theuer acted as secretary as As- 
sistant Chief of Police Jack Hartnett had other important 
committments. 

One of the most interesting items on the day's proceed- 
ing was the report of the committee which handled the 
annual ball last October. 

Chief Wisnom, in charge of tickets and sales, reported 
the gross receipts totalled $12,731.33, and when all bills 
are paid will net over $9,000, a nice sum for the widows 
and orphans fund. The ball was a gala event held at the 
skating rink in San Mateo. 

The General Chairman was Captain Tom O'Connors. 
Sergeant Lawrence Furio headed the refreshments com- 
mittee, floor and decorations committee was headed by 
Officer Ernest Pence, Sergeant Jack Pence handled the 
music arrangements, and Chief Thomas Keary of Menlo 
Park was in charge of the reception committee. 

The Association, deeply interested in the juvenile prob- 
lem, had a committee of its members appointed to take a 
lead in this important question. President Wisnom ap- 
pointed the following: Pence, Sergeant Douglas, and 
Jack Price. 

The meeting voted to buy a Bear flag, California's state 
emblem, with all the accouterments necessary for having 
it on display with the Stars and Stripes at each session. 

FBI Special Agent Cost addressed the meeting and in- 
vited all to attend the law enforcement conference for the 
fourth quarter scheduled for Redwood City, in the 



Sequoia School November 22. He quoted from Child 
Special Agent N. J. L. Pieper's announcement of the 
series of conferences being held this month and up until 
December 7, throughout Northern California, in which he 
stated the meeting will deal with examinations of physical 
evidence such as spectrographic, ultra violet, firearms iden- 
tification, development of latent fingerprints, handling, 
identifying and preservation of evidence. 

Nomination for officers were made and these will be 
voted on at the election to be held in December meeting. 
Following are the names presented, and further names 
may be presented on the night of election: 

President — Captain Tom Connors, San Mateo 
First Vice President — Lawrence Furio, Burlingame 
Second Vice President — Thomas Kearny, Menlo Park 
Secretary — Deputy Chief Jack Hartnett, Burlingame 
Treasurer — Jack Theuer, Burlingame 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Leroy Hubbard, Atherton 
Trustees (one elected) — Officer Cole Stafford and 

E. E. Pence 
Officer Whipple of the South San Francisco Police De- 
partment invited the members to hold their next meeting 
in his city and his invitation was accepted and the meeting 
was set for the evening of Tuesday, December 14, at 
6:30 o'clock. 



MOLINARI TAKES THIRD 

STRAIGHT CUP TITLE 

Policeman Jim Molinari won the El Camino Golf Club 
championship for the third year in succession yesterday. 
He defeated Armand Lacombe in an interesting final, 4 
and 2. 

Policeman Jim made several mistakes en route to victory 
but he starred just as often as he erred and, in the long 
run, had too many shots in his bag for his opponent. 

Molinari was four over par with a 76 for the morning 
round yet managed to be one up at the end of the eigh- 
teen holes as Lacombe needed 77. 

Lacombe Rallies 
The first nine holes of the afternoon found Lacombe 
slipping badly while Molinari shot even par and became 
four up leaving the twenty-seventh. 

Lacombe cut the Molinari lead to but two up when, 
after losing the twenty-ninth, he won the next three in a 
row. But Policeman Jim promptly fired a birdie and a par 
at his opponent to win the next two holes and end the 
match, 4 and 2. 

All of which brings us to the point of remarking that 
you gotta hand it to Molinari. He has golfing moxie. He 
may not be the fanciest looking golfer in a field but he's 
never whipped until the last putt is down, and wins more 
often than he loses. Although he has lost the San Francisco 
and Northern California titles which he won last year, 
don't be surprised if he wins em again before long. — 
By Harry Hayward, Sports Editor, The Examiner. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 




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ANOTHER NICE CLEANUP 

In midmorning of November 20 Chris Katsanos was 
alone in his grocery store at 1498 Dolores Street when a 
young man entered and approached him. With his hand 
in his pocket indicating he had a gun, the young man 
announced "This is a stickup. Don't yell or I'll kill you!" 

Katsanos disregarded the admonition and started hol- 
lering, also starting for the door. The would-be stickup 
man, taken aback by this turn of affairs, hastened out, got 
into a car parked near the store and dashed away. 

The groceryman returned to the store and phoned the 
police, and here started a series of events that shows how 
every branch of the Police Department is coordinated. 

When the word was flashed over the air from the 
Bureau of Communications, to all radio cars and bureaus, 
Inspector John McDonald, of the Auto Detail listened in. 
When it was announced that an automobile was used in 
the get-away, McDonald got busy pretty fast. He had a 
report on the theft of a car from the private garage of Lou 
Hoss, 1870 Pacific Avenue, during the night. He recalled 
that there had been a series of grocery store burglaries 
during the past week in which a stolen car was involved. 
He felt the Hoss car was involved in this job. Therefore 
he picked up the telephone and told the radio boys down- 
stairs to flash the license number of Hoss' car. This was 
done. 



How right Inspector McDonald was! For the words of 
the announcers had scarcely died away when Officers 
Henry Klein and Lee Gavin of the Traffic Bureau saw 
Hoss' car speed by, with a young man at the wheel. They 
gave chase and, after a block, ran the fleeing car to the 
curb. With guns drawn, they made the driver get out. He 
was brought to the Hall of Justice, where he confessed to 
five grocery store robberies. Lieutenant James Malloy, in 
charge of the Robbery Detail, got ahold of the man's 
record. He had given the name of Richard Morris. Malloy 
was astonished to find this Morris, who was sent up 14 
months ago from this city on a robbery charge to serve a 
one-to-life sentence, had been paroled on October 2v 

Morris said he had been turned loose with the under- 
standing that he was to join the Merchant Marines, but 
evidently he felt he could do better "clouting" grocery 
stores. 

He has a long record of arrests, starting, as they all do, 
with petty thefts and stealing automobiles until they 
graduate to the gun-toting stage. Likewise he winds up as 
all these easy-winners do when they figure to outsmart the 
law. 

MENTAL ATTITUDE OF 

AUTOMOBILE DRIVERS 

by Dr. Karl A. Menninger, at the 32nd Rational Safety 
Congress, Chicago, Illinois, October, 1943 

It is proper for the policeman to gain a somewhat 
higher opinion of himself and recognize a necessity which 
is not recognised by the public at large; namely, that he is. 
actually one of the leaders of the community. He must 
identify himself with the conscience of the community, a 
conscience which may be either a conscience of ideals or a 
conscience of vengeance, and it is the former which is 
most effective. A policeman's duty is not to arrest people; 
it is, as much as possible, to avoid arresting people, to 
enable people to avoid the necessity of being arrested. 

People are more comfortable when they can have the 
feeling that there are rules and regulations regarding such 
things as driving, for example, which exist for a reason 
and from which it is not the privilege of the individual to 
take exception. They are more comfortable when they feel 
that such rules and regulations are enforced by umpires, 
and by umpires who are friends of all drivers. They want 
to feel that these policemen are friends with authority like 
the doctors who say you may do this and you may not do 
that; and you have been making a mistake, do not make 
it again. 

People like this kind of supervision; a policeman who 
has this attitude furthers public safety and makes people 
love the policeman instead of fearing and hating him. 
Those whom we love we strive to please, not out of fear 
but out of love. Call it respect, admiration or anything 
else you wish, but it really is love. If a policeman must 
make an arrest he does it in a very different way from the 
predatory sadist, the small-man-in-big-blue-pants who ex- 
ploits his authority to the discomfiture of an occasional 
offender but who in the long run encourages law breaking 
and the defiance of and disrespect for the guardians of 
public safety. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Swell Cooperation 



As an example of the continuance of the spirit of co- 
operation existing in the San Francisco Police Department 
with the departments of other cities, we would cite the 
arrest of a burglar who broke into The Waldorf Tavern, 
San Mateo, stole 58 cases of whiskey, a rare commodity 
for the drinking man, with one other suspected perpre- 
trator, and the recovery of all the wet goods. The case was 
cleaned up in San Francisco. 

The break came with the arrest of one Carl Hendershot, 
a taxicab driver, on November 18. Hendershot was out on 
bail on a manslaughter charge growing out of the death of 
a sailor in front of a San Francisco tavern. On November 
18 he was picked up by Inspectors George Page and 
George Dyer of the Special Works Detail for having a car 
the Los Angeles police said had been stolen in that city. 
It was a Cadillac sedan. 

The General Works Detail advised the Burglary Detail 
of this arrest and Inspector Richard O'Hughes, head of 
the Burglary Detail, and his partner, Inspector James 
Johnson, were very much elated. 

Hendershot being booked en route to Los Angeles could 
not make bail, so Johnson and Hughes knew they had 
plenty of time to connect Hendershot with burglarizing 
the San Mateo Tavern. Their main reasons for suspecting 
him was that the liquor had been moved in a Cadillac 
sedan. While they knew they had plenty of time, they 
did not relax, for on Friday night, with Page and Dyer, 
they made another pinch that broke the case wide open. 
They "knocked over" three people in a tavern out on 
Quintara Street and the trio arrested lost no time in "sing' 
ing." They said they had gotten liquor from a taxi driver 
whom, they said, was Hendershot, they not knowing at 
the time he was in the municipal brig. 

With the statements of the three, Hendershot was 
brought forth and given an insight of how efficiently the 
Inspectors Bureau works, and when Inspector Hughes 
completed his presentation of the facts he and his partner 
and Inspectors Page and Dyer had developed, Hendershot 
wilted and laid the rest of the story in the laps of the 
inspectors. 

He said he had dropped into the Waldorf Tavern and 
that in the course of his visit he found they had enough 
whiskey to last for two years. He decided to change this 
and get it for his own purposes, even if not to spread over 
two years. So, when the tavern closed, he returned there 
and, with a brace and bit, bored holes in the door of the 
tavern and got access to the cellar. He made two trips to 
San Francisco to make the transfer of the 58 cases. He 
turned in 48 cases and the inspectors have assurance they 
will get the other ten before this magazine is out for this 
edition. 

On the 22 nd of November Inspectors Page and Dyer 
arrested Edgar Dolen, who has done time in San Quentin 
and Folsom and who is known to have fraternized with 
Hendershot. They expect to get the location of the other 
ten cases from Dolen. 



Chief Thomas Burke of San Mateo was high in his 
praise for the fine work the San Francisco Police did in 
clearing up this case, which is one of the very few felonies 
committed in his city. 

SEASON'S GREETINGS 

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL 

34 7 DOLORES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 



Phones VAlencia 5 12 1-22-23 

KEN ROYCE CONSTRUCTION 
EQUIPMENT RENTAL CO. 

San Francisco Office and Yard: 
185 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 95 76 

Compliments of 

A & B MARKET 



2 75 1 2 I ST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 1633 Open Day and Night 

MANHATTAN LUNCH CO. 

QUALITY FOODS - POPULAR PRICES 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2597 MISSION STREET 
Corner 22nd 



Compliments of 

McKune Metal Products Co. 

266 TEHAMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 5 131 



GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO. 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 



NINTH and HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MORGAN & SAMPSON 

SUPERIOR SELLING SERVICE 



869 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DITTO SALES & SERVICE 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

EMERALD H. CHARONATT 



Phone HEmlock 4486 

T. J. REID COMPANY 

Fumigation for the Past Fifty Years 

417 SO. VAN NESS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Richmond 85 



The Continental Insurance Co. of New York 



DAN NOZIGLIA 

AGENT 
Real Estate - Insurance 



5 15 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone: Office. 31; Warehouse. 3 77 



Robert Dornan. Prop. 



RICHMOND SUPPLY CO. 

Complete Line of Building Material 
Fuel and Feed 



139 RICHMOND AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Adolph Juel in Alaska 



December, 1943 



The following article was written by Adolph O. Juel, 
retired inspector of the San Francisco Police Department 
and for years in charge of the Bureau of Identification of 
the Department. He had much to do with the installation 
of finger printing and other methods of criminal identi- 
fications which have been developed to their high state of 
perfection. 

His story is as follows: 

On November 1st an article appeared in the Magazine 
Section of the Examiner which dealt with the life of the 
Eskimos on Nunivak Island, which is located approxi- 
mately 700 miles north of Dutch Harbor. 

This article was written by Miss Margaret Landis of 
the American Museum of Natural History and interested 
me greatly. 

I was shipwrecked on that island with a brig named 
"Timandra" of San Francisco, one of the first days of 
May, 1879, and together with a Chilean named Jose 
Godoi lived there with the Eskimos till the end of August, 
1880, when we were rescued and brought to San Fran- 
cisco by the schooner "Western Home." 

Some of these native Eskimos had seen white men when 
they made trips to the mainland, located not many miles 
from the island, but as far as we could learn, we were 
the first to visit and live among them. 

During our stay there I never heard of the seal being 
a sacred animal, and the Eskimos' principal food during 
the summer was reindeer meat. There was great herds of 
them on the island at that time. During the winter the 
seal was the principal food. 

While living there I was treated with great respect by 
the natives, but my partner they did not seem to care for. 
The reason for that, I believe, was that I had bright red 
hair, whereas my partner was very dark. 

Whenever something happened in the settlement they 
always came to me for advise. 

I had the privilege to witness a funeral, which to me 
was very interesting. A native came to me one day and 
told me that the old chief of the tribe had passed away, 
and they wanted me to come over to the house. (They 
were all underground dwellings.) 

My partner and I went over there but they only al- 
lowed me in the house, and I found there his two wives 
preparing the body. They tied both his knees up to the 
chin, then covered his whole body with skins, after which 
they tied him up with walrus strips. When finished, I 
wanted to carry the body out, but they told me to get 
out of the house. 

My partner and I seated ourselves on top of the house, 
wondering what was going to happen next. After a short 
time the earth where we were sitting was removed and a 
hole made in the roof, through which the body was passed 
to me. I asked one of the wives the reason for doing this 
and she told me that if they had not done that he would 
surely find his way back again; whereas, now he would 
not be able to find the entrance to the house. 



My partner and I then made a bier by taking two boat 
cars and placing boards crosswise on them. When finished 
we placed the body on the bier. Then, with all the natives 
following, we began our march to the chief's last resting 
place. 

There was a place prepared near the beach, built of 
rocks the shape of an Eskimo igloo. In that we placed the 
body in a sitting position, together with his bow and 
arrows and wooden bowls full of food, and all other 
implements belonging to him. His two wives were stand- 
ing outside; also a boy about 10 years old whom I was 
told was his son. 

One of the wives was young, the other very old. We 
were all gathered outside the igloo and there was chanting 
done by the natives, after which the old wife entirely 
disrobed the younger one, and her garments all were 
thrown in by the chief's body, after which she was given 
a new suit to put on. 

The natives then gathered some moss and set fire to it, 
and all of them, one at a time, stood over the fire shaking 
their clothes. They told me that they purified themselves 
against sickness and that was the end of the service. 

In the K[ational Geographic Magazine of September, 
1942, I saw a picture of the treeless, fog-bound Nunivak 
Island, which is now the breeding ground of imported 
musk oxen. 

Phone ORdway 9175 

ROBERT L. LIPPERT THEATRES 

MAIN OFFICES 25 TAYLOR STREET - SUITE 400 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Ph. DOuglas 8466 Successors to M. Phillips & Co. Established 1868 

PHILLIPS MILLING COMPANY 

RICE and FLOUR WHOLESALERS 



38 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 7197 



Compliments of 



CAL'S FOUNTAIN 



9 10 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 3 800 



West Coast Distributors 



SIMONS, BOGER 8C CO. 

THE ALLEN-A COMPANY 
Underwear - Hoisery - Swim Suits - Sportswear 

86 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 2191 

HANCOCK BROS. 

EXPERT TICKET PRINTERS 



25 JESSIE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: DOuglas 1145; Res. ORdway 0629 

ALBERTO ALEMAN 

CONSUL CENERAL DE PANAMA 



461 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

NORTHAM WARREN CORPORATION 

813 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



SO. PAC.'S NEW RADIO PROGRAM 

One of the most dramatic shows in the history of radio, 
dramatic in its simplicity and its sound effects, has had its 
debut over a network of stations covering the Pacific 
Coast and blanketing territory as far east as Ogden, Utah. 

It is the half-hour Southern Pacific's thrilling drama- 
tization of the war work on the West's largest railroad, 
entitled, "The Main Line." 

In brief, the presentations — first of which went on the 
air November 10 — glorify the efforts being put forth by 
the men and women of America's railroads to keep the 
trains rolling and to hasten the day of victory. 

Simple stories of the unheralded sacrifices, thinking and 
planning of railroad personnel furnish the motif for the 
programs, made alive and spectacular by amazing authen- 
tic sound effects. 

These effects are real in every particular, sound equip- 
ment having made recordings in roundhouses, signal 
towers, engine cabins, along rights of way, in dispatchers' 
offices — in all nerve centers of the system. As a result 
there has geen gathered the largest and most complete col- 
lection of railroad operation sounds ever put together. 

With thousands of railroaders listening in, each one a 
critic unto himself, extreme care has been taken not only 
in insuring that all sound effects are authentic and fit the 
particular action of the play, but in selection of the cast 
so as to avoid "over-acting" in favor of true reproduction 
of railroad language and railroad life. 

Narration has given way to simple, man-in-the-street, 
every-day story telling. The result is unique in radio 
presentation. 

Railroading today is a most essential war industry and 
continued efficient operation of the Southern Pacific par- 
ticularly, is imperative in order to handle the vast quantity 
of fighting material and fighting men passing through Pa- 
cific Coast ports en route to the Pacific battle zone. Im- 
perative, too, in transporting as speedily as possible to 
hospitals, the flow of wounded Americans being returned 
to the United States through West Coast ports. 

Ninety-five thousand employees of the Southern Pacific 
want the general public to know just what they are doing 
to keep the trains moving. They are proud of their jobs 
and the effort they are putting forth for Victory. They 
need help and believe that this weekly, night-time drama- 
tic show may help to secure that additional help. 

These inside, human stories of railroading are being 
presented every Wednesday night over the Mutual-Don 
Lee network at 8:00 o'clock, Pacific Coast time, and 
locally over KFRC. 

"The Main Line" is a Foote, Cone 6? Belding show 
created by Mark Buckley, who was the producer of the 
radio mystery series hit, "Whodunit." Script is prepared by 
the ace writer Lew X. Lansworth and the action is di- 
rected by him. Wally Maher, whose high reputation is 
based upon his brilliant previous performances in many 
leading air shows, is narrator. 

"The Main Line," packed full of drama and thrills, is 
the first such radio presentation ever sent out over the air 
by any railroad in the country. It is well worth a tune-in. 



Conserve Gas Fue 
his Winter 



Fuel is one of the really important 
items in the war effort. The Govern- 
ment has asked all of us to do our 
share in its conservation. You can be 
helpful this winter by conserving GAS 
in the home. The following are simple 
methods of GAS conservation: 

1. AVOID OVERHEATING. 
Maintain temperatures essential to 
health. Turn off the heat when 
leaving the house. Do not heat 
unused rooms. See that your* fur- 
nace is functioning efficiently. 

2. BE CAREFUL IN COOKING. 

Keep the burners of your range 
clean. Use the oven only for cook- 
ing and not for heating the kitchen. 

3. DO NOT WASTE HOT WATER. 

Don't fill the tub or run the hot 
shower more than necessary. Avoid 
wasting hot water down the drain 
as in rinsing dishes with running 
water. See that all leaky faucets or 
pipes are repaired promptly. 

Be sure to follow these suggestions 
and do not waste GAS. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned - Operated - Managed 

by Californium-: 

P J 212-1243 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1942 



Try Your Hand At This List 

True and False Questions Taken From Captains and Lieutenants Examination of 1942 



132. Involuntary manslaughter means the same as acci- 
dental homicide. 

133. An assault is an unlawful attempt, coupled with 
present ability, to commit a violent injury on the 
person of another. 

134. An assault is not punishable unless accompanied by 
battery. 

135. Embezzlement is the fraudulent appropriation of 
property by a person to whom it has been entrusted. 

136. A criminal act is not less punishable as a crime be- 
cause it is also declared to be punshable as a con- 
tempt. 

137. No person can be punished for a public offense ex- 
cept upon a legal conviction in a court having juris- 
diction thereof. 

138. All public offenses must be prosecuted by indictment 
or information. 

139. The proceedings by which a person charged with a 
public offense is brought to trial and punished is 
known as an indictment. 

140. Any officer who neglects or refuses to obey the 
command of a writ of habeas corpus directed to him 
is guilty of a felony. 

141. The taking of any person from the lawful custody of 
any peace officer by means of a riot constitutes a 
lynching. 

142. A rout and a riot mean the same thing in so far as 
the penal code is concerned. 

143. Any person who enters any house with the intent to 
commit a felony is guilty of a burglary even though 
act is not carried out. 

144. No burglary committed in the day time can consti- 
tute burglary in the first degree. 

14?. Only when the property exceeds $200 can the theft 
be considered Grand theft. 

146. No person can be subjected to a second prosecution 
for a public offense for which he has once been 
prosecuted and convicted or acquitted. 

147. All criminal actions involving felonies must be tried 
by jury. 

148. A private person cannot break open the door or 
window of a house in order to make an arrest for 
a felony. 

149. A private person can under no circumstances arrest 
a person for a misdemeanor. 

150. A police officer may be justified in breaking open a 
door or window of a house in order to make an 
arrest even though the offense may be a misde- 
meanor. 

151. An issue of fact arises only upon a plea of "Not 
Guilty." 

152. A person arrested for any felony is not eligible for 
release on bail. 



153. A warrant of arrest is addressed to the accused 
person. 

154. According to the penal code "Night time" is defined 
as the time between sunset and sunrise. 

155. If the elements of force and fear are absent in 
taking of property from the person of another, it 
is considered as robbery. 

156. Property unlawfully taken from the person of an- 
other consistutes Grand Theft regardless of the 
value of the property. 

Phone 14 

DR. EDMOND M. DIEFENBACH 

Surgical Chiropodist - Foot Specialist 

AMERICAN TRUST BLDC, RICHMOND CALIF. 

Phone LAndscape 5-3355 

A. R. MARKSTEIN & SONS 

Distributors "7-UP" 
Golden Glow, Lucky Lager, Rainier Beer & Ale - Emil Sick's Beer 

700 SAN PABLO AVE. ALBANY, CALIF. 



VAL STROUGH CHEVROLET CO. 

3330 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 7420 

THE SYSTEM KEY WORKS 

General Repairing of All Kinds - Auto Locks and Handles 
BONDED LOCKSMITHS 

1844 SAN PABLO AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2 7 Your Downtown BUiCK Dealer 

CONTRA COSTA MOTORS 

Complete Automotive Service - Used Cars Bought and Sold 
2 22 TENTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 3058 R. O. Mathews R. P. Mathews 

MATHEWS WELDING WORKS 

COMPLETE WELDING SERVICE 

152 7 BARRETT STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 243 



Seth Corey 



COREY'S GARAGE & AUTO SUPPLY 



15 11 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 4613 

PIONEER FARM 

Eggs - Butter - Cheese - Buttermilk - Quality Dairy Products 
2701 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Phone TWinoaks 2472 I. C. Unruh, Prop. 

OAKLAND WELDING SUPPLY 

Victor Distributor - Repair Service on All Makes of Equipment 
Acetylene & Electric Rods, Supplies & Equipment 

186 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone BErkeley 1534 

MUELLER'S Pharmacy 

Prescriptions - Merck's Chemicals - Sickroom Supplies 

Household Necessities (Squibb - Coreco - Nyal) 

2129 UNIVERSITY AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 2689 W. H. Verbiscio, Prop. 

IDEAL TRAILER CAMP 

Licensed Camp - Modern Facilities - Transportation 
Accommodations 



1238 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



157. In order to constitute burglary it must be shown 
that the premises were entered for the purpose of 
stealing property. 

158. There must be at least three persons assembled to 
constitute an unlawful assembly. 

159. Setting fire to a building with intent to defraud an 
insurance company is a clear case of arson. 

160. While attempting to burglarize a house, the burglar 
kills the towner. In a case like this, the charge is 
always murder in the first degree. 

161. A, who was on bad terms with B, threw some con- 
centrated acid in the face of B. As a result, B will 
lose his sight. A can be prosecuted for assault and 
battery but not for mayhem. 

162. X, under the influence of liquor, steps off the curb 
and is knocked down by Y's automobile' and killed. 
This is a clear case of manslaughter. 

163. A threatens verbally to shoot B, unless B pays A 
a certain sum of money. This is a clear case of 
blackmail. 

164. M offers H, a witness in a court case, $10 to influ- 
ence him in his testimony. M is guilty of subornation 
of perjury. 

165. A induces B, a 17 year old girl, to have . . . with 
him. The most appropriate charge in this case is 
seduction. 

166. Indispensable evidence is that without which a par- 
ticular fact cannot be proved. 

167. Knowledge of the court must be substantiated by 
testimony of witnesses before it may be considered 
evidence. 

168. By the law of evidence, everything submitted as 
evidence must be proved. 

169. The law of evidence requires such a degree of proof 
that the possibility of error is eliminated. 

170. A writing may be proved by anyone who saw the 
writing executed. 

171. All representations other than those deemed con- 
clusive are denominated disputable presumptions. 

172. Prima facie evidence is that which the law does not 
permit to be contradicted. 

173. Corroborative evidence is additional evidence of a 
different character, to the same point. 

174. The direct evidence of one witness is all that is 
required to establish any fact. 

175. Usually a witness may testify only to facts which he 
knows of his own knowledge. 

176. A witness can be heard only upon oath or affirma- 
tion. 

177. The jury and not the court is the exclusive judge 
of the credibility of a witness. 

178. None but a material allegation need be proved. 

179. Each party must prove his own affirmative allega- 
tions. 

180. The organic law and the unwritten law are synony- 
mous. 

181. Inferences and presumptions are considered primary 
evidence. 



Phone Richmond 1950-J 

DR. FLOYD W. TURPEN, D. C. 

GENERAL PRACTICE 
Hours: 9:00 to 5 - Mon„ Wed., Fri. Evenings, 6:00 to 8:00 

661 TWENTY-NINTH STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 



J. R. WATKINS CO. 

Best in Extracts - Spices - Drugs - Toiletries 

2 44 7 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

F. H. DAILEY MOTOR CO. 

EAST I4TH & 4 1ST AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 3882 



Dr. O. P. Hause, Mgr. 



DR. J. A. CAMPBELL 

DENTISTS 



915'.; MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 506 and 507 



Eighteen Years of Service 



DAVID M. ROSE 

Automobile Parts and Accessories - Wholesale and Retail 
We Do Towing 

MACDONALD AVENUE at 25TH RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone LAkeside 7884 Cadmium Plating by the Udylite Process 

Progressive Plating and Enameling Works 

Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Brass, Bronze and Zinc Plating 
Oxydizing, Lacquering, Spraying, Special Finishes 

880 27TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone LAndscape 5-2233 Wm. T. Donahue, Owner 

RAINBOW PAINT STORE 

Featuring Premier Paints - the Practical Painters Line 

735 SPOKANE ST.. ALBANY - 316 I ITH ST., RICHMOND. CALIF. 
Phone SUtter 2482 

MARCUS BROWER & CO. 

PRINTING - ENGRAVING - BOOKBINDING 
SANSOME and BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 26, CALIF. 

C. P. Goemmer, Resident Manager 

PACIFIC AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE CO. 

Individual Underwriting Corporation - Managing Underwriters 



355 FIFTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone Piedmont 6262 - 6263 



Larry Madden 



MADDEN PLUMBING 8C HEATING CO. 

INDUSTRIAL PIPING 



3 103 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllogg 2-2062 



J. Peters, Prop. 



OAKLAND CENTRAL CREAMERY 

Milk, Butter, Cream, Eggs, Cottage Cheese, 
Buttermilk and Chocolate Milk 



3071 E. I4TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Peterson Tractor 8C Equipment Co. 

CATERPILLAR Tractors-Road Machinery - Diesel Engines 
JOHN DEERE Tractors-Engines - Farm Implements 

Ph. SWeetwood 5600 - 685 A STREET, HAY WARD, CALIF. 
Ph. BRentwood 105 - 923 HARRISON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

SNAP-ON TOOLS, INC. 

2 76 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone BErkeley 2291 



W. V. Bragdon 



CALIFORNIA FAIENCE COMPANY 

Makers of Pottery and Ornamental Tile 



1335 HEARST AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



182. A presumption is a deduction which the law ex- 
pressly directs to be made from particular facts. 

183. Any presumption may be controverted by other evi- 
dence, direct or indirect. 

184. The burden of proof lies on the party who would be 
defeated if no evidence were given on either side. 

18?. No evidence may be presented in a criminal action 
except by oral examination. 

186. A witness is allowed to refresh his memory respect- 
ing a fact by referring to notes written by himself at 
the time the fact occurred. 

187. It is the right of a witness to be protected from ir- 
relevant, improper, or insulting questions. 

188. All questions of law are decided by the court. 

189. The jury are the judges of the effect and value of all 
evidence addressed to them. 

190. The jury is subject to the control of the court. 

191. Secondhand book dealers are required to post a list 
of currently-used school text books in their places 
of business throughout the school year. 

192. It is unlawful for any person to peddle goods of any 
kind upon the streets of San Francisco. 

193. The books of dealers in secondhand ware, listing a 
description of the articles purchased and the name 
and residence of the person from whom such pur- 
chases were made, must be open to inspection of the 
police. 

194. The business of renting automobiles without a driver 
or operator thereof is subject to police inspection and 
regulation. 

195. Drivers and operators of public vehicles for hire 
must report to the Bureau of Inspectors of the Police 
Department within 24 hours all property of value 
left in their vehicles by passengers. 

196. It is unlawful to play poker for money in any public 
place. 

197. It is not unlawful for a person to utter obscene or 
profane language unless it is done within the hearing 
of three or more persons. 

(Continued Jsfext Issue) 

Phone HEmlock 7 709 

MERITALL SUPPLY CO. 

Bar Glassware and Sanitary Supplies - Cocktail Lounge Furniture 

1118 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



2761 MISSION STREET 



WM. TOPS BAKERY 

ALL KINDS CAKE and BREAD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS 



TWENTY-ONE CLUB 



EL CERRITO 
CALIFORNIA 



FRUEHAUF TRAILER COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



. • . Still at the Same Stand . . . 
BOLDEMANN CHOCOLATE CO. 

Compliments of 

PETRI WINE CO., INC. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone SUtter 184 7 Weighing. Strapping, Stenciling, Reconditioning 

MacNICHOL & CO. 

Service Contractors - Certified Public Weighmaster 
Labeling, Forwarding 

PIER 5 SAN FRANCISCO 

Established 1852 

EHRMAN BROS., HORN & CO. 

Importers and Wholesalers - Wines and Liquors 



360 SIXTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 4222 



Compliments of 



Bay Cities Ice and Cold Storage Co. 



715 BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 0446 



Italian California Wine Co., Inc. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



2966 24TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 7912 

FRED RIENECKER 



Steel Paint Pail Reconditioning 



2837 ARMY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 55 70 



Albert Deitsch 



A 8C B TRUCK EQUIPMENT CO. 

A Complete Line of New and Used Trucks - Motors - Wheels - Hoists 
Truck Parts of Every Description - Rebuilt Transmissions, Rear Ends 

2 75 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 

Grocery Phone RAndolph 1753 Butcher Phone DElaware 1689 

ETALO MARKET 

Groceries That Are Fresh and at Reasonable Prices Always 
Meats - Fish - Poultry - Fruits - Vegetables 

2714 SAN BRUNO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Pho 



VAle 



8021 



Open 24 Hours 



JOE FRANZELLA 

FRUIT MARKET 
Fruit and Vegetables - The Best For Less 
300 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone WEst 9975 

"Buckhorn" Ben Watts Monterey Cave 

Where Sportsmen Meet and Piscatoral Achievements are Related 
with Embellishments by Masters of Rod, Reel, and Gun 

1440 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone LA 5-4733 "Out San Pablo in Albany" 

A. D. HACKIM 

EAST BAY CHEVROLET COMPANY 



916 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



ALBANY. CALIF. 



Phone AShberry 6226 



V. F. Andre 



A & L PATTERN WORKS 



Wood and Metal Patterns 



845 CARLETON AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone HUmboldt 6262 



ROBERTSON RUG WORKS 



2030 THIRD STREET Phone UNderhill 3600 SAN FRANCISCO 



1032 36TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



December, 194 3 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS 1 JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Our Police Department Allies 



By Opie L. Warner 



One of the pleasures of my busy life is listening to a 
man who has done deep and sincere thinking or has 
spent much time in studying some one particular life 
problem. 

Recently I found myself listening, with genuine 
pleasure, to a local citizen of outstanding educational 
achievements, who placed before me a mental vista of 
social conditions of the long past yesterday of San Fran- 
cisco — only to turn with condemning words to this 
present seething era in our city by the Golden Gate. 

Somewhat sadly we mutually agreed we are living 
in an all-too-practical age — even out here in the boundless 
West. My friend stated he was loath to admit the days 
of old, and gold, and Forty-Nine are gone. He also 
reminded me of the fact that the good old days of 
rugged individualism are merely a memory; that, today, 
instead of two or three professions there are two or three 
hundred — and even then, specialists in each group. 

Here in the city by the Golden Gate, he said, which, 
within the memory of men and women of today, was a 
scene of the turmoil, abandon, glamor, and physical out- 
bursts attendant on pioneering on a large scale, we find 
our youthful San Franciscans of both sexes prosaically 
looking to the future, and, even in the grammar grades, 
talking seriously of the particular line of endeavor they 
will follow as their life work. 

During a slight lull in our conversation I casually 
congratulated my friend on the physical fitness of his 
appearance. He smiled knowingly and said there was a 
very potent reason for his being in good shape at the 
present time. 

To my surprise I found my good friend had just re- 
cently become a member of the San Francisco Police 
Department — that is, this substantial citizen proudly in- 
formed me he was now a San Francisco Auxiliary Police 
Officer, affiliated closely with a police department than 
which there is none better, he said. 

With genuine pleasure I listened patiently while my 

Phone TWinoaks 3434 

SENTINEL CHEMICAL COMPANY, INC. 

Guardian of Quality and Service 
1790 1ITH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 5523 Beauty Parlor Equipment 

L. NEWMAN 

Tool, Die and Machine Work - Designing and Metal Stamping 

Contract Manufacturing 

1001 24TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

Golden West Savings and Loan Association 

1632 FRANKLIN STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone HIghgate 8100 



WILLIAM H. HOLLANDER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



learned friend boldly pictured our San Francisco police 
officers of today in a pride of place away above the lowly 
niche he had always allotted to them. Now he is one of 
the big brothers to the City's Finest — on the inside look- 
ing out, as it were — and he appraises our police depart- 
ment minus blue glasses. Yes, point of view does make 
quite a difference. 

For the ordinary citizen policing has a definite unex- 
plainable lure. 

It is a pretty well recognized fact that there is a 
so-called spirit of larceny in each of us; and, it would 
seem, we all feel, to a greater or less degree, we are 
detectives. In fact, the demand for so-called detective 

PEERLESS BUILT-IN FIXTURE CO. 

"BUILT-IN FURNITURE" 



2608 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



DR. DAVID GROSSMAN 



DR. HAROLD GATES 



OPTOMETRISTS 

2207 MACDONALD AVE. - RICHMOND. CALIF. - Ph. Richmond 343 
1129 SOLANO AVE. - ALBANY. CALIF. - Ph. LAndscape 52 1 12 
818 MACDONALD AVE. - RICHMOND. CALIF. - Ph. Richmond 750 



Phone HUmboldt 5 122 



Thomas Nesbitt 



BEATIE STEEL AND SUPPLY CO. 

Iron and Steel Products - Pipe, Fittings and Valves 

1650 32ND STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KE. 2-9293 



Lonnie Galyen 



HI 14 CAFE 

PACKAGE GOODS 



43 01 EAST I4TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 9638 



H. C. Villolobos «c Son 



EL FAROLITO CAFE 

Tamales - Enchiladas - SABROSO MENUDO 
SABADOS Y DOMINGOS - Cervezas De Todas Marcas 



2904 24TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 9985 



R. H. Disher, Prop. 



DEL MONTE GROCERY 

Groceries - Cold Meats - Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 
Cigars, Cigarettes and Candy - Sodas, Beer & Wines 

2249 I7TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone UNderhill 9309 



THE JUNGLE 



3 481 I8TH STREET, near Valencia Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 9288 



DAVE 



JOE 



DON 



GREEN LANTERN GARDEN 



2302 MARKET STREET, cor. 16th Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ESTEBAN ALCARAZ 



ROSE BERNARDO 



LA VICTORIA 

MEXICAN RESTAURANT 



202 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



RAY BLDO, 1924 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



JACK LAURICELLA 

MUTUAL FURNITURE SPRAYING CO. 

Furniture Finish and Refinishing 

SAN FRANCISCO — 1700 FOLSOM STHEET • Ph. HEmlock 6438 
OAKLAND — 1505 MITCHELL STREET - Phone FRuitvale 075 IW 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



stories always exceeds the supply ; and even the radio 
circuits are virtually cluttered with them. 

Yes, would-be solvers of crime and thwarters of crim- 
inals are legion; and include both sexes, from the teen 
age to the octogenarian. In fact, every good citizen is a 
latent police officer. 

Writers who condemn the supposed lack of assistance 
the ordinary citizen lends to police departments make 
the mistake of ignoring the fact that people as a whole 
are really police minded. Take our own city as an example. 
San Francisco wanted auxiliary police in this present 
crisis. The result of the city's expressed wish was an im- 
mediate enrollment of some six thousand men and an 
imposing army of men has been expertly trained under 
the direction of Deputy Chief Michael Riordan. 

Just imagine this small army of our good citizens who, 
week after week, right here in San Francisco, forego their 
clubs and their usual relaxation routine to spend long 
hours in our local police stations receiving actual training 
as police officers. These men who present an excellent 
cross section of our staunch San Francisco manhood are 
known as Auxiliary Police Officers — the term ''auxiliary" 
being, to my way of thinking, unnecessary. 

They have their posts, duties and uniforms. They are 
a distinct and tangible corps — ready and willing when 
the call comes to protect their fellow citizens by every 
means in their power ; all this without fee or reward. 

Instinctively nobody likes crime or criminals. A negli- 
gible percentage in every community is anti-social and 
inclined to prey on the great mass of honest-thinking 
humanity. But, we must not forget the man in the street 
is for square dealing — the observance of the Golden Rule. 

Our Auxiliary Police are our Second Battalion as it 
were. Of this Second Battalion, trained to the minute to 
make San Francisco a safe place in which to live, I have 
heard the highest official and unofficial praise. Chief 
Dullea may well be proud of this unit of protection. 

As a civic unit, the San Francisco Police Department 
is proud of this citizen battalion, proud of those staunch 
citizens who, by rushing to the colors of the San Fran- 
cisco Auxiliary Police, demonstrated their sterling citizen- 
ship and unqualified courage. 

BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 



Phone GLencourt 6 746 



William E. McCrath 




McGRATH STEEL COMPANY 

Reinforcing Steel - Steel Products 



131 HARRISON STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone BErkeley 4134 

SWASEY'S 

Picture Framing - Gilding - Pictures - Paintings Restored 



2285 SHATTUCK AVENUE 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



I 1 I 1 WASHINGTON STREET - OAKLAND 



Phone Higate 5657 



THE OAKLAND TOGGERY 

LADIES' AND INFANTS' WEAR 
1444 23RD AVENUE ■ OAKLAND Phone ANdover 2378 

3332 EAST I4TH STREET - OAKLAND Phone KEllog 3-0961 

VALLEJO DOLLAR STORE - 340 GEORGIA ST., VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 3-4220 

MELROSE BUILDING MATERIALS CO. 

Ready Mixed Concrete - Building Materials 



4501 TIDEWATER AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

GRANBERG EQUIPMENT, INC. 



1308 67TH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 3-55 15 



J. Giezendanner 



MECHANO-ELECTRO WORKS 

Tools, Dies, Manufacturing and Experimental 



1 154 57TH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

BASIC VEGETABLE PRODUCTS CO. 

315 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone TEmplebar 0660 

LAWTON & WILLIAMS 

306 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

SNAP-ON TOOLS CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of 
Wrenches and Hand Tools for Production - Maintenance - Service 

276 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

EARLE M. JORGENSEN CO. 

STEEL 

1657 22ND STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

STERLING LUMBER CO. 



Building Material Merchants 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

PHILIPS REFRIGERATION PRODUCTS, 
Incorporated 

Phone UNderhill 9187 

CHARLES TAMALE CAFE 

Wholesale or Retail 



4133 18TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 0498 



Mill Saw Filing a Specialty 



F. P. SMITH SAW WORKS 

Band Saws Brazed Set and Filed 
Planer Knives Ground 

415 TENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



THE CANDID FRIEND SAYS . . . 

By The Editor 

I have come to realize that ninety per cent of police 
work consists in patrolling, and that a poorly patrolled 
city is a poorly policed city. I have also come to the con- 
clusion that, in as much as a patrolman is constantly in 
contact with the entire cross-section of the public, he is the 
one particular man in a police department who should be 
a man among men — possess, in superabundance if possible, 
that greatest mental gift, horse sense. I have read wordy 
books on the subject of patrolling. I have also read the 
Rules and Regulations of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment on "patrolling" and having done so, feel in the 
mood to set down herewith some commandments on the 
subject. 

Don't fail to observe as you patrol your beat; good 
captures have been made by doing so. 

Don't rush unthinkingly into affairs; you may have a 
long time to think afterwards. 

Don't fail to note people traveling over your beat; it 
may save your job or win you commendation. 

Don't fail to use all necessary precaution in questioning 
a suspect ; it may save your life. 

Don't get careless when handling a prisoner ; an ounce 
of prevention is worth a pound of cure. 

Don't fail to take advice from a competent source; a 
swelled head congeals the brain. 

Don't jump at conclusions; stop, look and listen. 

Don't fail to patrol the full length of your beat ; your 
job or promotion may be at either end. 

Don't fail to note the character of places along your 
beat; you may be called on for an explanation. 

Don't engage in protracted conversation with people 
along your beat; something may happen to your detriment 
while so engaged. 

Don't give your unasked opinion on matters other than 
police business ; it may cause you some embarrassment. 

Don't fail to use all safeguards in hazardous acts; a 
wise man is a brave man. 

Don't question a suspect with your hands in your pock- 
ets; you may get a punch in the jaw — if not worse. 

Don't go into action unprepared ; the unexpected gen- 
erally happens. 

Don't let your prejudices warp your judgment; remem- 
ber you are a servant of all the people. 

Don't be blatant and abusive; be firm but courteous. 

Don't fail to give the unfortunate the benefit of the 
doubt ; remember the law does. 

Don't fail to make necessary written reports; they may 
save you a lot of trouble. 

Don't get in the habit of paying no attention to what 
to you may seem small matters; great oaks from little 
acorns grow. 

Don't get in the habit of depending on others for every- 
thing you do; be something other than just one of the 
sheep. 

Don't consider yourself merely a deck hand ; the beat 
is your ship, and a good captain knows his barque from 
stem to stern and from mizzen top to keel. 



MARKET STREET RESTAURANT 



2097 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HALLORAN'S CAFETERIAS 



9 14 MARKET STREET 



34 3RD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 2017 Established 1890 

Marion Treated CEDAR kills Clothes-Moths and their Larvae 

Sold at Department Stores and Manufactured by 

LINDAUER & COMPANY 



3 5 OAK GROVE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones SUtter 1642-1643 

ROLANDO LUMBER COMPANY 

FIR - SPRUCE - REDWOOD 
Yard and Mill: 5TH & BERRY STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 8164 



SUNSHINE CURTAINS, INC. 



740 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 9576 



A &, B MARKET 



Fruits - Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 
Beer and Wine 



2 I ST and BRYANT STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 441 I 



B. F. Record, Manager 



HANAN 8C SON 



Incorporated 
Fine Shoes For Men and Women 



157 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 5246 



G. Tofanelli 



A. ROMEO FISH & OYSTER CO. 

CABLE OYSTER DEPOT 



1444 POLK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Hlgate 0997 



Res. Phone GLencourt 5683 



ALBERT E. NORMAN 

Realtor - Fire Insurance - Loans - Notary Public 

3 80 FIFTEENTH STREET — Res. 817 Barbara Road OAKLAND 

Phone TWinoaks 1822 

When you make up your mind to sell your real estate see 

BRUCE McCOLLUM 

McCollum Mortgage Co. - Cash Buyers of Real Estate 

1444 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Ph. LAndscape 5-3838 - Res. Ph. LAndscape 5-3260 Carl W. Douglas 

FAIRMONT MONUMENT WORKS 

"Lasting Memorials for 1 Those Who Care" 
7524 FAIRMONT AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Near Sunset View Cemetery 



MATSON ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT CO. 



3 781 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phones: Office GLencourt 6510; Res. HUmboldt 8208 

JAMES H. GILLARD 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
520 INSURANCE BLDG.. 1404 FRANKLIN ST. OAKLAND 



COPPER CLUB 

5880 DOYLE STREET 
EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



LIEUTENANT JOSEPH P. CURTIN 

of the United States Navy 

Members of the San Francisco Police Department who 
have joined the United States Navy have established a 
fine record for advancement. They have been quick to 
take advantages offered in this branch of the war service 
for advancement to the men who make up the sea fighting 
force. They likewise seem able to adjust themselves to the 
discipline, and they master the duties assigned them in a 
most admirable manner. 

This brings us to Officer Joseph P. Curtin, who until 
he went into the Navy about 18 months ago had spent 
most all his time in the Police Department with the Rich- 
mond Station under Captain Francis McGuire. In his 
service with the San Francisco Police Department, Officer 
Curtin displayed an interest in police affairs that brought 
him commendations from his superior officers. When he 
went into the Navy this attention to mastering all details 
of any job given him paid off, for he is now a Lieutenant 
(j.g.) and is headed for the University of Arizona for 
further training in the duties of a commissioned officer. 

Officer Curtin when he enlisted in the Navy took his 
basic training at Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego, and 
came out, as most police officers with sufficient service as 
such, a specialist. 

He was sent to Farragut, Idaho, where one of the 
largest United States Navy Training Station is located, 
and he was assigned to the Security Department and soon 
raised his rating to Specialist (A) . 

He was placed in charge of 60 brig guards and 20 radio 
patrol drivers, had charge of the selection of men from 
recruit companies to qualify as guards. It was his duty to 
see that these men maintained the highest type of physical 
fitness, and he instructed them in the care and use of fire' 
arms, as well as drilling them in marching and teaching 
them the manual of arms. 

It was his duty to give instructions in naval procedure. 
He had supervision of taking prisoners to and from the 
station when it concerned civilian authorities or for other 
stations. He made good in all these things. 

He applied his experience in the Police Department, to- 
gether with the background of his education, which in- 
eluded graduation from Mission High School in 1931 and 
from St. Mary's College in 1935. At St. Mary's College 
he was prominent in football under Coach "Slip" Madi' 
gan, being an outstanding halfback. 

His progress to a commissioned rank in the Navy indi- 
cates that Officer Curtin has plenty on the ball, and is 
an example of what opportunities there are in our armed 
forces for a young man with amibition and intelligence. 

After he completes his course at the University of Ari- 
zona he expects to be assigned to sea duties and it's a safe 
bet that he will climb even higher than he has during his 
comparatively short term in the Navy. 

BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 



Phone Mission 3164 Mme. J. P. Lacoste 

GOLDEN STAR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Laces, Lace Curtains, Silks and Blankets a Specialty 
3031 22ND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 1201 



PARTIES 



WHOLESALE 



MENDY'S PIE SHOP 

FRIED PIES 



33 72 26TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLAS HOTEL 

MRS. DAHLKE. Manager 



33 77 26TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Mission 5865 A. LEAL, Tailor 

TERMINAL CLEANERS 8c DYERS 

Where Your Business Is Appreciated and Your 
Garments Receive the Proper Care 

3392 26TH STREET, near Mission SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 9144 



M. Nello 



S. Giusti 



V. Alello 



THREE PAL'S CAFE 



LUNCHES - DINNERS - FINE WINES and LIQUORS 
Next to Home It Is the Best Place to Eat 



3151 I7TH ST., Bet. So. Van Ness & Folsom 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 4 72 7 



3351 20TH STREET 



T. Villaran, Prop. 

MI RANCHO 

Tortillas - Tamales - Chorizos - Free Delivery 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MISSION TIME SERVICE 

Watchmaking and Repair 
3168 22ND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

KINGSWELL BROS. LTD. 

BRASS FOUNDRY 

444 NATOMA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

IRVING LUNDBERG & CO. 

BROKERS 



411 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MATHER BROS. 

AUTO REPAIRS 

All Makes of Cars 

6041 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



GENERAL PACIFIC SCALE CO. 

464 7TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GRANNUCCI HARDWARE CO. 



142 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone RAndolph 0303 ■FOR QUALITY" William Schraft, Prop. 

EXCELSIOR BAKERY 

FRESH BREAD, PIES AND PASTRY Always on Hand 
WEDDING & PASTRY CAKES Promptly Made to Order 



4492 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 2652 

C. J. TAGLIABUE MFG. CO. 

Instruments for Indicating, Recording and Controlling 
120 MAIN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



December, J 943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



Phone Richmond 1411 

RICHMOND PRODUCE COMPANY 

Incorporated 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS - WHOLESALE FRUIT and PRODUCE 
394 I 7TH STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 



EL NIDO MARKET 

Joe Farn - Louis Pizeale 



SAN PABLO and SACRAMENTO 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 677 



EDITH CAIN Phone DOuglas 5 IE 



THE TREASURE CHEST 



Richmond's Distinctive Gift Shop 



ISLE CAPRI RESTAURANT 

Famous for . . . BONELESS STUFFED CHICKEN WITH RICE 



92 7 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



550 CREEN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone 382 



LOUIS F. WAGNER. Prop. Phone EXbrook 7191 



ELECTRIC MODERN PASTRY SHOP 



22 11 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 634 

RICHMOND BEVERAGE COMPANY 

Wholesalers of 
GRACE BROS. - RAINIER - SCHLITZ 



325 22ND STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 663 



R. H. SPIERSCH 



SPIERSCH BROTHERS 

Your Plumbers and Metal Workers Since 1902 
320 THIRTEENTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone 7 72 

POWDER PUFF BEAUTY SHOP 



339 TENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 14 73 FRANK BANDUCCI 

"Dad's Famous Chili" 



ROY BANDUCCI 



THE BASE HIT 

Beer - Wine - Liquors 
512 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 828 CLAIRE SCHMIDT 

RICHMOND FUNERAL PARLORS 

3 32 ELEVENTH STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 848-849 

Richmond Navigation & Improvement Co. 



THIRD and CUTTING BOULEVARD 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 4165 

WISEMAN'S 

2420 SHATTUCK & I I I MACDONALD AVE. RICHMOND, CALIF. 
Phone Richmond 142 1 S. C. TOWNSLEY, Prop. 

TRAVELERS HOTEL 



Steam Heat - Bath and Showers 
Transient - Monthly Rates 



521 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 493 5 



GENE BAILEY 



TEN-RIP SERVICE 



I0TH and RIPLEY STREETS 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



A. R. WEISGERBER 

DE SOTO and PLYMOUTH 
1225-1231 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone HIgate 1350 

LAHER SPRING & TIRE CORP. 

Tires - Batteries - Springs - Brake Lining 
26TH and MAGNOLIA STREETS OAKLAND, CALIF. 

GENERAL CABLE CORPORATION 

6201 GREEN STREET EMERYVILLE, CALIF. 



RATHJEN BROS., INC. 

Established 1882 
135 BERRY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

...ASK FOR... 

MONARCH FINER FOODS 

Sold by 
RETAIL GROCERS FROM COAST TO COAST 

Compliments of 

QUEEN LILY SOAP 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Manufactured by 
PIONEER SOAP COMPANY 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

PETRI CIGAR CO., INC. 



901 BATTERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

LEON HOMMEL MACHINE WORKS 

2 340 ADELINE STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Compliments of 

LIGHTNER 8C LIGHTNER 

SAN PABLO CALIFORNIA 

CHECKER VAN 8C STORAGE CO. 

CAREFUL MOVING 

622 I7TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

DIAMOND DAIRY 

4706 GROVE STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

THE B. F. STURDEVANT CO. 

BLOWER MANUFACTURING 
THIRD and BANCROFT BERKELEY, CALI.F 

Phone VAlencia 2681 R. Ybarra, Prop. 

EL FARO GROCERY 

Specializing in Mexican Foods 

Groceries - Fresh Fruits - Vegetables - Beer - Wines 

2399 FOLSOM STREET, cor. of 20th St. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone ATwater 6644 

OLD LIBERTY BAKING CO. 



3251 26TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Res. Phone Mission 2013 



E. Ottoboni, Prop. 



VAN NESS SOUTH GROCERY 



601 VAN NESS AVE.. SO., cor. 17th 



SAN FRANCISCO 



M. ROGAN 

Fruits - Groceries - All Kinds - Reasonable Prices 

2840 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



POST STREET AUCTION CO. 

Sale Every Wednesday 
1863-1867 Post Street San Francisco 

CALIFORNIA FILTER CO. 



981 Folsom Street 



San Francisco 



JEAN BART & CO. 



699 2nd Street 



San Francisco 



Phone VAlencia 4460 

BILLS GROCERY 

Delicatessen - Fine Groceries - Liquors 

2601 Folsom Street San Francisco 

RAILROAD GROCERY 

TONY CROTTA 
283 1 Mission Street San Francisco 

Phone Fillmore 7301 William Ortlinghaus 

ANTIQUE REPAIR SHOP 

Furniture Repaired and Refinished 
2224 Union St., nr. Fillmore San Francisco 

Phone VAlencia 2921 Since "09" 

HAIDEN AUTO WRECKING 

Late Model Cars and Trucks Wrecked 

655 Potrero Avenue San Francisco 

Phone SKyline 1442-1443 

MacKillop Hardware Store 

Sherman-Williams Paints - Philco Radios 

658 Clement Street San Francisco 

Phone DOuglas 3 982 

PAUL RIEGER 8C CO. 

HIGH GRADE PERFUMES 
220 Commercial Street San Francisco 

Phone WAlnut 2869 

FREDERICKSEN HARDWARE 

Complete Line of Hardware 
3029 Fillmore St., nr. Union San Francisco 



HOCHWALD CHEMICAL CO. 



135 Mississippi Street 



San Francisco 



M. SCHUSSLER 8C CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry 

150 Post Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

CHINESE KITCHEN 

Pacific and Mason Streets San Francisco 
Phone HEmlock 0475 

THE WHITE HOUSE 

DYEING & CLEANING WORKS, Inc. 
174 14th Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 7565 

HOZ LABORATORIES INC. 

Hair and Scalp Oil - Liquid Shampoo 
718 Mission San Francisco 

Phone DOuglas 3262 

SHARKEY HAT CO. 

Manufacturers of Uniform Caps 

143 Second Street San Francisco 



HUGH F. HALL 



22 70 3rd Street 



San Francisco 



JOS. LEVIN 8C SONS 



2225 3rd Street 



San Francisco 



Phone SUtter 2565 F. Cammas, Manager 

HOTEL TEMPLE 

ONE HUNDRED ROOMS 
469 Pine Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 3219 Leo Austin, Auctioneer 

San Francisco Art Gallery 

AUTIONEERS and APPRAISERS 
550 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Phone GArfield 1809 

ATKINSON-STUTZ CO. 

Wholesale Lumber and Its Products 
112 Market Street San Francisco 



Phone HEmlock 8408 

THE SUNBERRY COMPANY 

Beverage Bases - Fine Fruit Syrups 
12 50 Folsom Street 



San Francisco 



Phone SUtter I 153-54-55 

M. H. NUSBAUM 

NUSBAUM WHOLESALE HARDWARE CO. , 
871 Folsom Street San Francisco 



Phone OVerland 2978 M. Fernandez, Prop. 

Forest Hill French Laundry 

HAND WORK 
143 West Portal Avenue San Francisco 

DEANS 8C HOMER 

Insurance General Agents 
340 Pine Street San Francisco 



Compliments of 

HARRY WINTERS 



704 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Phone DOuglas 2 700 F. A. Beronio 

STETTHEIMER CO. 

Mfg.& Distr. Knitted Textile Specialties 

755 Market Street San Francisco 



Phones Richmond 3849-3850 A. Kastelic 

Civic Center Tire 8C Battery Co. 

Automotive Equipment 

213 1 Macdonald Avenue Richmond. Calif. 

Cochrane, Mehan Si Ayer 

Investment Securities 
3 I 1 Central Bank Bldg Oakland, Calif. 



Phone SUtter 9838 



C Giannini 



COLOMBO MARKET GRILL 



626 Front Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Piedmont 3 101 

San Pablo Auto Wrecking Co. 

SYSTEMATIZED WRECKING 
3291 San Pablo Avenue Oakland, Calif. 



Phone Hlgate 4523 

WEARTEX RUG COMPANY 

Weartex Braided Cotton Rugs 
2533 Magnolia Street Oakland, Calif. 

LAkehurst 2-6400; Meat: LAkehurst 2-6401 Phone SUtter 8106 General Blacksmithing 



Phone GArfield 9417 

JOE POHEIM, INC. 

Tailoring For Men 

32 Powell Street San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 3105 Wholesale & Retail 

WALTER N. BOYSEN CO. 

Boysen 100 Per Cent Pure Paints 
Civic Cen. Br.: 333 Larkin St., San Francisco 

Phone ORdway 9642 Expert Workmanship 

N. H. HOWARD 

Sterling Auto Top Co. - Seat Covers, Etc. 

7 78 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



PERRYMAN'S MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Meats 

2723 Encinal Avenue Alameda, Calif. 

Phone LAkehurst 2-8616 

Ben Reimer's Home Nursery 

Roses - Bedding Plants - Trees - Shrubbery 

2057 Encinal Avenue Alameda, Calif. 

Phone TRinidad 9744: Res.: TRinidad 8145 

Wade's Delicious Doughnuts 

R. B. EDWARDS 
5835 Foothill Blvd. Oakland. Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 5671 

JOHN H. PIEPENBURG CO. 

JEWELERS and SILVERSMITHS 
193 6 Broadway Oakland, Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 0978 

CALDOW PAINT COMPANY 



National Auto-Body Works 

Trucks and Commercial Bodies - Welding 
846 Harrison Street San Francisco 

Phones: UNderhill 0800; Res.: Mission 7261 

PIONEER PIPE CO. 

Reconditioned and New Pipe Casing 

63 4 Townsend Street San Francisco 

Phones: DOuglas 2071-2072 Since 1875 

Roma Macaroni Factory 

Vegetable Macaroni "A Health Food" 
Francisco St. & Grant Ave. San Francisco 

Compliments of 

NEW CENTRAL FLORISTS 



639 Green Street 



San Francisco 



2050 Broadway 



Oakland, Calif. 



Phone EXbrook 1711-2 Since 1902 

Western Builders' Supply Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers' Agents and Jobbers 
401 Fourth Street San Francisco 

Phones: GArfield 84 17-8418 A. Solomon 

GENERAL FIXTURE CO. 

Hotel and Restaurant Supplies 
953 Mission Street San Francisco 

Compliments of 

Simplicity Pattern Co., Inc. 

109 New Montgomery Street San Francisco 
Phone YUkon 0340 

GENERAL FISH CO. 

Fish and Seafood - Wholesalers 
535 Washington Street San Francisco 

Phone HEmlock 4261 G. Adame. Prop. 

CENTRAL MARKET 

Carniceria Y Abarrotes. Servicio A Domicilio 
429 Ninth Street San Francisco 



Phone GLencourt 6606 Plating of all kinds 

Enterprise Plating 8C Enameling Co. 

Headlight Reflectors Silver Plated 
780 22nd Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 8157 

DELAL WHOLESALE CO. 

Notions - Household Remedies - etc. 
352 4th Street Oakland, Calif. 

EDWARD BROWN 8C SONS 

Pacific Coast Insurance General Agents 
1916 Franklin Street Oakland. Calif. 

Phone Hlgate 365 1 Meals from 1 1 to 8 p.m. 

GRINAKER COFFEE SHOP 

Sea Food Cocktails, Salads and Louis Dishes 

3350 Grand Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

Compliments of 

OAKLAND PANTS FACTORY 



1922 San Pablo Avenue 



Oakland, Calif. 



Claus Hinck, Prop. 

MAYROSE BAKERY 

The Bakery of Quality and Variety 
524 Castro Street San Francisco 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Phone VAlencia 7407 

Habeeb's New Guerrero Groceteria 

Member of Neighborhood Stores, Inc. 
698 Guerrero St.. cor. 19th San Francisco 



Phone MOntrose 4849 



JEWETTS GROCERY 



260 Judah Street 



San Francisco 



Phone Mission 95 12 Reasonable Prices 

24TH 8C MISSION MARKET 

Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 
2 791 Mission Street San Francisco 

Bill Page's Standard Service 

Tires and Recapping 



Barrett and San Pablo 



Oakland, Calif. 



Phone Piedmont 0527 



Paul Ritter 



MOTOR SERVICE COMPANY 

Buick - Oldsmobile - Pontiac - Chevrolet 
493 40th St. at Telegraph Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 1 92- J 

FINNISH STEAM BATHS 

Massage "for your health" 

Week Days: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

5*15 Tenth Street Richmond, Calif. 

CHELEMEDOS MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 

Free Delivery 

1251 Solano Avenue Albany, Calif. 

Phone TWinoaks 1828 

PENN FUR COMPANY 

Exclusive Furs - Complete Fur Service 
1744 Telegraph Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Piedmont 8114 Ben Oyarzo, Prop. 

BEN'S GARAGE 

General Auto Repairing - Welding - Brazing 
127 41st St., 85 ft. Piedmont Ave., Oakland 

Phone TEmplebar 704 1 Tops 6c Upholstery 

RAY N. CANN 

Body and Fender Repairing - Painting 
333 26th Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone ATwater 5916 

MISSION BELLE 

Women's Apparel Exclusively 
2436 MISSION STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DElaware 5644 Res. ELkridge 1455 

Mission Bedding & Upholstering Co. 

MATTRESSES RENOVATED 
4 72 7 MISSION STREET, SAN FRANCISCO* 

Phone EXbrook 492 7 

NEW EXPOSITION CAFE 

All Kinds of Liquors, Wines and Beer 
532 CREEN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 9855 Charlie Dahlstrom 

SPOKANE INN 

LUNCH WITH BEER 

348 DRUMM STREET. SAN FRANCISOD 

HEmlock 9027 HEmlock 8551 

THE GOLDEN OAK 

CHOICE LIQUORS, BEERS and WINES 

298 VALENCIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone GArfield 3522 

American Electrotype Division 

Electrographic Corporation 
329 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLIMENTS 

Edmund Loewy 8C Co., Inc. 

130 SUTTER STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

HARRY HALL & CO., INC. 

EXPORTERS 

PACIFIC COAST PRODUCTS 

16 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FR ANCISCO 

Telephone CArfield 7189 

VELIA MODES CALIFORNIA 

IMPORTERS— MANUFACTURERS 

222 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 7338 

M. PHILLIPPS 

Doctor of Chiropractic 

29 1 Geary St., cor. of Powell, San Francisco 

Phone EXbrook 7544 

M. CAFFERATA 

Tortellini - Ravioli - Tagliarini, Noodles 

700 Columbus Ave. San Francisco 

Phone Richmond 477 

E . C. CRANE 

Window Shades - Linoleum 

2011 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Phone AShberry 7113 

STONE BROS. 

2484 Shattuck Avenue Berkeley, Calif. 

Phone: Office, GL. 1908 - Res., AN. 9633 

The Prudential Ins. Co. of America 

Room 729 Broadway Building 
14 19 Broadway Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Piedmont 7230 W. M. Pitts, Prop. 

THE AVENUE MARKET 

"Good Things to Eat" - Meats, Groceries, 

3 42 1 San Pablo Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

AL'S MARKET 

Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables 

Choice Meats, Wines, Liquors 

385 1 West Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 4071 

H. S. HENION 

Attorney at Law 

1706 Broadway Oakland. Calif. 

Phones: Bus., PI. 0427-0428; Res., OL. 6657 

C. W. Campbell Auto Rebuild 

Reconditioning Wrecked Cars 
5001 Grove Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone KEllog 2-4526; Res. Phone, SW. 1390 

J. B. MILLS 

Real Estate - Insurance 
53 10 Foothill Blvd. Oakland, Calif. 

COMPLIMENTS 

THIEMANN 8C JOHNSTON 

THIRD and CHANNEL STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO 

W. O. FILES 8C COMPANY 

Mortgage Loans Since 1921 
W. O. FILES— Phone EXbrook 5480 

San Francisco 



309 Kearny Street 



J. C. BARDELL 

ART PRINTING 
Postcards DOuglas 8944 View Books 

215 LeidesdorfF Street San Francisco II 

Phone DOuglas 03 03 

J. H. H A U S E 

PATTERN MAKER 

264 Townsend St. San Francisco 

FIDELITY TRADING CO. 

EXPORT IMPORT 

212 California St. San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone RAndolph 1300 

N. J. FARRAH 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

4458-60 Mission Street San Francisco 

Phone GArfield 7663 A. C. Becker, Supt. 

Cement Gun Construction Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
9 MAIN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE G. OLSHAUSEN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

1303 Mills Tower 

Phone EXbrook 2503 San Francisco 

HOTEL ADMIRAL 

608 O'FARRELL STREET 

TUxedo 9594 San Francisco 



Phone Kellog 2-8572 Repairing - Engraving 

PETERSON - JEWELERS 

Fine Stock of Watches, Clocks & Diamonds 
3236 East 14th Street Oakland. Calif. 

Phone TRinidad 1 68 Immediate Delivery 

RAY'S DRUG STORE 

Prescription Service - Wines and Liquors 

Open 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

7501 MacArthur Oakland, Calif. 

Phone HU. 0728 Al. Santoni 

AVENUE AUTO WRECKING 

New & Used Parts - We Buy, Sell, Exchange 
3120 San Pablo Avenue Oakland, Calif. 

A. 8C J. LEVIN 

LUGGAGE, LEATHER GOODS, TRUNKS 

Agency Wheary Luggage 
S66 Market Street EXbrook 9636 

EXbrook 4005 Harvey Lum, Manager 

ANDY WONG'S 

Mission Trails Restaurant 

500 SUTTER, at Powell San Francisco 



MARIO 



RAY 



DOC 

RAY'S 

1250 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

JULIUS BUFFET 

532 KEARNY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

LA SALLE GARAGE 

HORACE O. LITTLE, Manager 

981 Howard St., near Sixth San Francisco 

Telephone DOuglas 8911 

OLD HOME PIE SHOP 

ALL HOMEMADE 

54 WEST PORTAL AVE. MOntrose 4180 

COMPLIMENTS 

FERNBACHER LOBE CO. 

130 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Lumber Plywood Mouldings 

KOENIG LUMBER CO. 

1701 JUDAH ST., Corner 22nd Ave. 

M. F. Conklin. Manager MOntrose 0516 

DOuglas 6947-8 

LANDIS AND COTTLE 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

369 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 3 707 

Ignition Supply 8C Exchange Co. 

ART SMITH 

300 GROVE ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone DOuglas 2856 

CARL LAMERDIN 

Furniture, Linoleum, Stoves — New & Used 
1226 Stockton St., bet. Pacific fit Broadway 

JACK FORBES PANTRY 

172 FOURTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLIMENTS 

MONTAGUE CO. 

360 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

CHAIN BELT CO. 

3 66 BRANNAN ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

KNITKRAFT. Sportswear 

51 STOCKTON STREET, near O'Farrell 
2544 MISSION STREET, nr. Twenty-second 
Telephone ATwater 1690 San Francisco 



RAndolph 9666 



Parts and Accessories 



PRIOLA BROTHERS 

Sales, Service — Repair on All Makes of Cars 

4885 MISSION ST. San Francisco. Calif. 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



TOMMY'S TAP ROOM 

1196 GENEVA AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 

Welding Service Sales, Inc. 

926 HOWARD STREET 
DOuglas 3292 San Francisco, Calif. 

M. ANDERSON THOMAS 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Telephone 814-818 Humboldt Bank Bldg. 



SUtter 0752 



San Francisco, Calif. 



McKELVEY'S GROCERY 



AGC 



301 EUREKA STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



AGC 



UNderhill 9367 "Where Old Friends Meet" 

GRACE'S CAFE 

BEER, WHISKEY, WINE 

531 OCTAV1A STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

HIgate 2853 

Oakland Health Food Store 

Splivalo Brothers 

1741 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, Calif. 

Phone THomwall 7466 

AMES PLANING MILL 

"If It's Made of Wood We Can Make It" 
1340 Channing Way Berkeley. Calif. 

HIgate 0871 Res. Phone OLmpic 8429 

PAVLIGER LABORATORIES 

Suite 327 Wakefield Bldg., 426 17th Street 
X-RAY Oakland, Calif. 

Phone BAyview 9633 Max Grillich, Prop. 

OWL BAKERY 

Like Mother Makes 

85 8 Stanyan Street San Francisco 

Phone MOntrose 9773 

BUSY BEE DELICATESSEN 

We Sell the Best at Reasonable Prices 
4508 Irving Street San Francisco 

Phone UNderhill 5 891 Fertilizer and Coal 

DROHER COAL CO. 

Big Saving on Coal - Cash and Carry 
1331 Folsom St., bet. 9- 10th San Francisco 

Phone Piedmont 4248 By appointment only 

DR. M. L. Dievendorf 

Chiropractor 
302 7 College Avenue 



Berkeley. Calif. 



Phone TEmplebar 6970 

I. C. TAPLEY 

Maker of Orthopedic Appliances 

563 Twelfth Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 510 F. Perata - D. Piazza 

PARK FLORIST 

Cut Flowers - Plants - Floral Designs 

1508-10 Macdonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 



Buy War Bonds 
for Xtnas Presents 



Phone OLympic 8332 

L. J. KRUSE CO. 

PLUMBING and HEATING 

624 7 COLLEGE AVE.. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS 

DAHL CHEVROLET CO. 

BROADWAY AT TWENTY-SEVENTH ST. 
OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

Bob Kurlich, Mgr. Phone KEllog 2-9126 

Better Service Cleaning, Dyeing 

QUALITY WORK — We Call and Deliver 
1926 23rd AVENUE, OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone Hlghgate 2580 for Appointment 

FANNIE WORK 

Finnish Scientific Massage — The Slenderizer 
Res.: 394 20th Street Oakland, Calif. 

Phone GLencourt 103 7 

Douthit Insurance Agency 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

FINANCIAL CENTER BUILDING 

Telephone TWinoaks 0842 

Ayer Belting and Supply Co. 

1019 HARRISON ST.. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

GLencourt 4643 

LEO FEINSTEIN, Manager 

Reliable Tire 8C Rubber Co. 

2630 SAN PABLO AVE., OAKLAND. CAL. 
Phone HUmboldt 9800 

M. HODGE 

FLORIST AND NURSERY 

4420 PIEDMONT AVE.. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

OLympic 72 10 X-Ray - Colonics 

DR. DOLPH A. SMITH 

CHIROPRACTOR — Nurse in Attendance 

5839 SAN PABLO OAKLAND. CALIF. 

THE CALIFORNIA 

Bottled Beer - Bottled and Bulk Wines 
Cigars - Cigarettes 

1716 Mackonald Avenue Richmond. Calif. 

Phone Richmond 4245 Will Fulthorp 

Richmond Radio, Battery 8C Electric 

Also Refrigeration Service 
1327 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Compliments of 

RICHMOND BRAKE SHOP 

1408 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 
Ph. Richmond 2446 "A Complete Food Store" 

7TH STREET MARKET 

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Groceries, Vegetables 
Cor. 7th and Macdonald Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 404 Larkin Smith, Mgr. 

WESTERN AUTO STORES 

Stores All Over the West 

132 7 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 

Phone LAndscape 5-5357 

ALBERTS NURSERY 

All Garden Supplies 

918 San Pablo Avenue El Cerrito, Calif 

Phone MArket 1723-1724 

GOLDEN WEST CALF CO. 

L. P. Labarraque, Prop. 
222 Eighth Street San Francisco 



TEmplebar 9933 George Heinold, Prop. 

FIRST AND LAST CHANCE 

The Historical Show Place of Oakland 
60 Years at 50 Webster St., Oakland, Calif. 

Telephone GLencourt 8486 

HUNT, HATCH 8C CO. 

Warehouse, 230 Second St. — GL. 8494 
201-213 FRANKLIN ST., OAKLAND, CAL 

TEmplebar 1916 Res. Phone: MErritt 3475 

O. W. JOHNSON 

MACHINE WORKS 

901 E. 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF 

HIgate 8815 Res.: Piedmont 4590-R 

SAM'S AUTO PAINT SHOP 

Lacquer and Synthetic Refinishing 
379 26th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone FRuitvale 4666 August Jensen 

BAY CITIES FORGE CO. 

Marine, Mine and Machine Forging 
1038 23rd AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone HIgate 4075 

California Scrap Iron Corp. 

23 10 PERALTA ST., OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Pacific Radiator 8C Fender Works 

3540 BROADWAY 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Office: HIgate 7371 Shop on Wheels 

Bonin Plumbing and Heating 

Repairing and Jobbing of All Kinds 
541 22nd STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Pho 



: 500 

SAVIN'S DRUG STORE 



(Sav-in-Drugs) 

4th and Macdonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 

Phone Richmond 175 7 

RICHMOND PAINT CO. 

1211 Macdonald Avenue Richmond, Calif. 



PURITAN PRESERVES 

"NONE BETTER" 
Phone WEst 3226 

New Fillmore Beauty Salon 

Any Desired Hair Style 

9 I 3 Fillmore St., nr. Fulton San Francisco 
Phone TUxedo 95 51 a la Bonne Soupe 

Camille's Monte Carlo 

French Restaurant - Dining room for parties 

157 Mason, bet. Eddy «c Ellis San Francisco 

Phone MArket 936 7 Batteries and Brakes 

TOPOLOS BROS. 

Automotive Service - Gas, Oils, Lubrication 

Page. Franklin, at Market St. San Francisco 

California Screw Co. 

74 Clementina St., nr. 2nd San Francisco 
Phone Mission 3604 Oxidizing, Spraying 

Occidental Plating Works, Inc. 

Alumilite Process, Chromium Plating, etc. 
2259 Folsom Street San Francisco 



Bright Boy: "Officer, is kite flying against the law?" 
Officer: "In certain parts of the city and county it is 

forbidden to fly kites." 

B. B. : "Can you give me the reason for this funny law?" 
Officer: "Like all our local laws, it was made for the 

good of the people of this community, both young and old." 
B. B.: "Officer, you are just like our teacher — talking 

in circles and never giving a guy a straight answer. Why 

can't I fly a kite as well as the guys living out at Bernal 



H e ig nts — w hat about the Constitution and that stuff 
about equal rights for all?" 

Officer : "The makers of our San Francisco City Char- 
ter provided for the zoning of the city as to allowing or 
not allowing certain conditions in certain districts." 

B. B.: "Thanks, officer; you did put the bee on some 
people, and didn't blame it on the war like they all do." 

( Now. some people would call B. B. a nuisance— or 
worse, perhaps.) 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' 

(Continued from Page 7) 
E. Hawkins, Northwestern Pacific Ry.; Henry E. 
Guzman. 

San Anselmo — Chief Donald Wood. 

Mill Valley — Chief James McGowan and Officer Ben 
Hartwell. 

Larkspur — Captain of Police Howard Clark. 

Santa Rosa — H. R. Joseph; U. S. Navy Shore Patrol; 
Deputy Sheriffs J. W. Pemberton, Andy Johnson, J. K. 
Maybee; Officers W. B. Clark, A. Z. Black, H. D. 
Huntington, and H. J. Davis. 

Sebastopol — Councilman Jack Tough, Chief E. J. 
Foster. 

Healdsburg — Chief J. Grant Carnegie. 

Yountsville — Rev. Norbert W. Feely. 

Napa — Deputy Sheriffs D. R. Rexroth, Don C. West, 
and H. J. Clark; Officer Orville W. Johnson; State High- 
way Officer F. K. Leber. 

Ukiah — State Highway Officer Austin Rawles. 

Albany — Councilman Frank V. Hays; Officers S. C. 
Williams, Jos. C. McLeod, Frank Regello, Vernon H. 
Freeman, R. H. Turley, John Viarengo, and William 
Hydie; B. W. Mowday; L. D. MacGregor. 

Oakland— Major George, C.M.P.; Sheriffs H. S. Adams; 
Lex Jensen, L. W. Lefort, Southern Pacific Ry.; W. A. 
Wallace. 

Emeryville — Mayor Al J. Lacoste; Chief Louis Mann; 
Deputy Chief Frank Farina; Orin V. Germeick; Ray 
Brown. 

Richmond — Chief L. E. Jones; Ray Wadde, Supt. 
Plant Protection Kaisers No. 3 Shipyard. 

Martinez — Judges Harold Jacoby and A. F. Bray; Con- 
stable B. B. Rogers. 

San Leandro — Captain A. L. Lamowreney; Officers 
Tony Cano and Ambrose Arbini. 

Hayward — Captain L. A. Eike, C.H.P. 

Hercules — Captain Joseph H. Frazer, Hercules Powder 
Company. 

Compliments of 

ANDREW WILLIAMS STORE 

OPEN 7:00 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT EVERY DAY 

1900 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 4550 

RICHMOND LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER - MILLWORK - GENERAL BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 

GIANT ROAD at RHEEM STATION RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 5077 

Compliments of 

OTTO L. STEELE 

STUDEBAKER SALES & SERVICE 
Better Used Cars 



LICENSED BROKERS Established 30 Years 

W. L. MITCHENER & CO. 

Hotels, Apartments, Rooming Houses, Real Estate, Insurance 
612 14th Street, Oakland, California TEmplebar 62 3 9 

WEARTEX COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WEARTEX RUSH. BRAIDED and WOVEN COTTON RUGS 

2533 Magnolia Street, Oakland HIgate 4523 

MARIO'S MONTEREY ROOM 

OAKLAND'S FAVORITE 
IN THE ST. MARK HOTEL 

LAIRD'S SERVICE STATIONERY 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE" 

HIgate 1722 

320 Thirteenth Street Oakland, Calif. 

OAKLAND CASKET COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers 
CASKETS & UNDERTAKERS' SUPPLIES 



2842 ADELINE STREET 



TEmplebar 8139 



OAKLAND 



RAY E. FOSTER 

AMERICAN DRAYAGE COMPANY 

HEAVY HAULING— MACHINERY— ROAD EQUIPMENT 

1171 Ocean Avenue Piedmont 4100 Oakland, Calif. 

SWEDISH AND GENERAL MASSAGING 

FRED S. JONES 

EXPERT MASSEUR — For Appointment Phone Piedmont 72 72 
861 FORTIETH STREET, OAKLAND, CALIF. 

CALIF. ELECTRO PLATING WORKS 

CADMIUM, CHROMIUM PLATING 

Household Hardware, Auto Parts Polished and Refinished 

Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Bronze Brass Plating and Oxidizing 

J. Ulrich HIgate 7862 1132 E. 12th St.. Oakland, Calif. 

FIELD & LUND 

BETTER AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

TIRES AND TIRE RECAPPING 
3512 Piedmont Avenue Piedmont 7535 Oakland. Calif. 

PHONE GLENCOURT 9856 ANTIQUES FOR SALE 

MERRITT UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Furniture Made to Order — ReBnishing and Repairing 

JAMES FAY 1223 FIRST AVENUE, OAKLAND, CALIF. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

Liverpool and London and Globe Ins. Co., Ltd. 

TRIBUNE TOWER, OAKLAND 

C. H. HITTENBERGER, INC. 

Makers of Surgical & Orthopedic Appliances 

Dress and Surgical Corsets — Artifcial Limbs 

Belts, Trusses, Braces & Arch Supporters 

421 NINETEENTH ST. TWinoaks 1644 OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone LAndscape 5-7336 



O. C. Nelson 



APEX PAINT COMPANY 

Manufacturers - An Apex Paint for Every Purpose 



1201 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



1626 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERRITO, CALIF. 



Compliments of 

FLEXAML SIGN MFG. CO. 

812 6 1 ST STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



Los Gatos— Councilmcn Bert Fresher, A. G. Jacobson, 
C. B. Sportswood, J. C. Adams: Chief R. M. Phillips; 
Constable E. O. Woods; K. O. Woods. 

Mountain View — Constable Chris Madsen; Deputy 
Constable Frank E. Smith; Assistant Chief of Police Ar- 
thur C. Nielsen. 

San Jose — Assistant District Attorneys Robert L. 
Drexel, Vernon E. Perren, Leonard R. Avilla; Captain 
R. J. Blackmar; Detective Roy Farley; City Clerk John 
J. Lynch. 

San Mateo— Mayor Claude J. Hirschey; Chief Thomas 
F. Burke; Chief Probation Officer F. J. Robinson; City 
Treasurer C. A. Ginnevy; Supervisor Fred Beer; Inspec- 
tor Robery O'Brien; Dr. N. D. Morrison. 

Redwood City— G. W. McNulty; Chief C. L. Collins; 
Recorder T. C. Rice; Superior Court Clerk Sidney P. 
Hinman. 

Burlingame — Mayor F. F. Burrows; Police Commis- 
sioners Allan T. Hunt and Peter Dahl; Chief John J. 
Harper; Supervisor E. R. McDonald; Special Officer P. 
C. Valentine. 

Hillsborough— City Manager E. P. Wilsey; Chief W. 
J. Wisnom; Judge Arthur H. Stetson. 

San Carlos — Mayor A. H. Sagehorn; Councilman E. 
R. Burton. 

San Bruno — Officers Russell Cunningham and Fred- 
erick Gomes. 

Daly City — Chief James G. Reardon; Officer August 
C. Benassini. 

South San Francisco— Officer William C. Whipple, Sr. 

Dixon— Chief H. C. Dixon; A. R. Peck. 

Sacramento — Supervising Inspector Henry Livingston. 

San Francisco — From the U. S. Navy: Lieutenant 
Colonel Thornton Wilson, Signal Aide; Admiral Green- 
slade; Major Harry E. Amey, Provost Marshall Fort 
Mason; Commander H. M. McKinley; Lieutenant A. J. 
Fidgeon, U. S. Army, Ft. Scott; Lieutenant Allan M. 
Moses, C. M. P.; Lieutenant Commanders George Ca- 



Phone SKyline 6617 



A. Fischer 



T. J. Fischer. Jr. 



FISCHER BICYCLE SHOP 

Rentals - Sales - Repairs - Accessories 
1 823 HAIGHT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

First Class Work - Under New Management 

STARLIGHT LAUNDRY 

784 STANYAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 7560 



Ship Chandlery 

DON. D. FLEMING 

SEIPEL IRON WORKS 



Steel Fabrication 



1079 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 8976 



L. PIATTI 

EUTE MACHINE WORKS 



227 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones HEmlock 0093 - MArket 8991 Fred Robanser 

ABCO REFRIGFRATION SERVICE 

ELECTRICAL FOOD MACHINERY CO. 

Everything in Refrigeration - Sales and Service 

291 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



YCRE FRENCH BAKERY 

THE HOME OF CRISP ROLLS 

The Best Since 1906 

1923-25 Fillmore Street Phone Fillmore 3535 San Francisco 

COMPLIMENTS 

BOWSER CO. 

468 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ALEMITE COMPANY 

OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 
HEmlock 0721 

1170 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

GEO. W. METLAR CO., INC. 

750 SECOND STREET 



PHONE SUTTER 8520 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MITTAG & VOLGER 

Incorporated 

MANUFACTURERS OF CARBON PAPERS, INKED RIBBONS 

591 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



R. MOHR & SONS 



883 Mission Street 



MOHR BUILDING 



San Francisco 



HOT SPOT 



ALL KINDS OF COCKTAILS 
79 Sixth Street, San Francisco EXbrook 0205 

BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY 

Executive Offices and Mills — Bridgeport. Connecticut 
1155 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WM. BLAUERT. Prop. Phone HEmlock 3 732 

MISSION SALAD KITCHEN 

DELICATESSEN FINE SALADS GROCERIES 

3147 16th Street San Francisco. Calif. 

EUGENE S. MINER CO. 

AUTOMOBILE RECONSTRUCTION 

EUGENE W. MINER 
1540 BUSH STREET ORdway 0100 San Francisco 

LANDO PRODUCTS CO. 

780 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO 

McBLAIN'S 

PIONEERS IN THE BUSINESS 



2164 Chestnut Street, near Pierce Street 
3041 Mission Street, near 26th Street 



WAlnut 9765 
Mission 1357-1358 



GENERAL REPAIRS 

KEY SERVICE MOTOR REBUILDERS 

Kwick-Way Precision Method Line Boring of Main Bearings 
3518 35th Avenue, Oakland ANdover 69 73 

BERRY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

FLOYD BERRY 

Phone GLencourt 5504 

352 Fourteenth Street Oakland. California 

BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



baniss, J. F. Coakley; and Paul Devine; senior patrol of- 
ficer; J. H. Fletcher, patrol officer; Captain Edward S. 
Jackson, U. S. Navy, retired. 

From State Narcotic Division — Inspectors L. G. Ether- 
ington, R. T. Simpson, Leo E. Rice, Thomas Marlowe, R. 
V. Armstrong, and Edward A. Oliva. 

Special Agents — J. J. Bresnahan and G. E. Godwin; 
John D. McKown, director; and Lieutenant James 
English, assistant director; Civilian Defense Chief Don 
Marshall and Earl McCann; State Board of Equalization, 
Inspector John Shellings; Opie L. Warner. 

Edmund G. Brown, district attorney elect; Frank H. 
Tharp, Burns Detective Agency; Assistant District At- 
torneys William P. Golden and Paul Madden; A. J. 
Kane, Kane Detective Agency; William E. Schoppe and 
M. L. (Jimmie) Britt, National Auto Theft Bureau. 

Attorney General Robert Kenny; J. F. Haudbine, spe- 
cial agent; A. J. Ford, C.H.P; Albert A. Rhine; J. C. 
Meinbress; A. Helgoe, American-Hawaiian Steamship 
Co.; Milton Pilhashy, Allied Investigating Bureau; F. H. 
Gardner, U. S. Treasury Department; Paul Watson, U. 
S. Customs; E. J. Ehmann, Pinkertons Detective 
Agency; Walter Vervias, special agent California State 
Automobile Association; L. Stadtfeld; Frank V. Smith; 
George Austin; Robert H. Morse. 



Phone UNderhill 912 1 



VIC and NELLO MASETTI 



BELL CLUB 

IT'S NOT THE MAN IN YOUR LIFE THAT COUNTS 
IT'S THE LIFE IN YOUR MAN 



164 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



H. W. GOULD 8C CO. 

MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERS 

MILLS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



SUTTER 9556 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



There Is Only One 



JOHN'S GRILL 

AND OYSTER PARLOR 



63 ELLIS STREET 



WILFRID J. G1RARD. Proprietor 



FISHER & CO 

265 MONTGOMERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



THE M. J. PRIEST COMPANY 

DENTAL SUPPLIES 

902 Butler Building, 135 Stockton Street 
Telephone GArfield 5830 San Francisco 

PAUL PACNI 

NOON LUNCH 



C. TH1ERY 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

ST. JULIEN RESTAURANT 

140 BATTERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO GArfield 6814 

De Luxe Evening Dinners Also A La Carte Service 

Phone CArfield 782 3 C. N. ROSS 

SWIFT, LTD. 

MEN'S WEAR 
Two Eighty Post Street, San Francisco 



MERCHANTS EXCHANGE 

BUILDING OFFICE 

465 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A Particular Laundry for Particular People 
WE HANDLE ALL CLASSES OF LAUNDRY WORK 



Bus. Phone MArket 9316 



Home Phone SEabright 5265 3335 SEVENTEENTH STREET 



PHONE MARKET 1130 



UNITED LIOUOR STORE 

JIM HATTIS, Prop. 



274 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 3240-1 

FURRER AND USTER 

Distributors for 
AMERICAN BOSCH CORPORATION 



225 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 1063 



COMPLIMENTS 

THE GREEN FROG 

135 FOURTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

THE YOUNG CHINA 

881 CLAY .STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CENTRAL STERILIZING PLANT 



270 SEVENTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 9873 



H. HENZI 



HARRY'S CUSHION SHOP 



Truck Cushions - Tops and Curtains 
Tarpaulins Made and Repaired 



I 144 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 2046 



MODERN CROCERY 



ANDREW ASIMOS 

WINES, LIQUORS and GROCERIES 

163 SEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Underhill 9679 



C. JORGE. Prop. 



LA NACIONAL 

MEXICAN and AMERICAN GROCERIES 



381 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 2050 



DE SOTO SEDAN SERVICE 



Swank with thrift 



Phone Richmond I 5 7 



D. W. WALDROP 



YOUNGER-SET 

Apparel for the Miss and Youthful Woman 

Telephone YUkon 1080 
145 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



SHAW'S 

QUALITY CANDY AND ICE CREAM 



122 W. PORTAL 



744 CLEMENT 



Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silverware 
Jewelry Repairing, Diamond Setting, Engraving and Enameling 

A. ENGLEHARDT 8C SON 

FAST WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING 

Room 1162 — Service Floor, Russ Building EXbrook 3856 

23 5 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 

EXbrook 0805 SUtter 5274 

CALIFORNIAA/ULCAN MACARONI CO. 

LEADING EXPORTERS— HIGH GRADE ALIMENTARY PASTE 

ROYAL Cello — Brands — VESUVIO Bulk 

Pacific and Drumm Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



December, J 943 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE 
COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 13) 
of it, including butter — all you wanted. Luncheon was 
served at 12:45 P.M. Past President Henri Kirby called 
the meeting to order at 1:45 P.M. He presided at the 
meeting in the absence of President Geo. K. Burton, who 
was unable to attend. 

Members and visitors were introduced, after which the 
minutes of the November meeting were read and ap- 
proved as read. 

Motion by Ray Gada, seconded by McKinney, that 
dues beginning January 1, 1944, be raised from $2.50 to 
$3.50 for active members, and for commercial members 
from $2.50 to $5.00. Motion carried. 

Motion by Harrington, seconded by Geo. E. Maxey 
that the Secretary-Treasurer receive a renumeration of 
50c per paid member. Motion carried. 

Mr. Harrington asked for a change of frequency for 
Mobile Units for Palo Alto, Menlo Park, and Atherton 
from 31780 Key to 33780 Key. Frequency changed — 
okeh'ed. 

McKinney and H. B. Beckers gave us a very enlighten- 
ing report of the national convention at Madison, Wis- 
consin. 

Brunton reported on Post War Frequency allocations 
for Police Department, which means that our National 
Planning Board will have to get busy to protect our 
present frequency allocations. 

General discussion by Lewis, McMurphy, Winters and 
Harrington on Commando Radio on the Coast and Bay 
Area. Adoption of a uniform code of communications by 
Peace Officers in and around the Bay Areas. 

The next meeting was requested by Inspector Winters 
for San Francisco. Accepted. 

At 3:30 P.M., Lieutenant H. W. Heiwinkel, Signal 
Corps, San Francisco, treated us to a reel of sound movies, 
furnished by the Signal Corps. The movies were very in- 
teresting and educational to all. Thanks, Lt. Heiwinkel. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 P.M. 
MEMBERS PRESENT 

Herman J. Schwandt, Ray Gada, Frank E. Winters, B. 
McMurphy, Henry Bogardus, Chas. H. Cross, H. B. 
Becker, John J. Hartnett, W. H. Harrington, Lloyd F. 
McKinney, Henri Kirby, Mott Brunton, A. J. Morganthal, 
Ed H. Bertola, Merrill LeBoeuf, Geo, S. Maxey, J. M. 
Lewis, Manuel Trinta, Don S. Hills, Lt. H. W. Heiwinkel. 
VISITORS 

John M. Wood, Eugene E. Nickels. 



PHONE UNDERH1LL 9345 



i BACK THE ! 

I ATTACK I 

I Buy War Bonds I 

*••*******••*••*•••*•••**••****••••***** 



1437 COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND BAR 



1437 HA1GHT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone WEst 3779 NO BRANCH OFFICE 

MME. FERRAN FRENCH LAUNDRY 

(Old Established Firm) 

Ladies' and' Gents' Underclothing Done Up in the Best Style 

Fine Laces and Lace Curtains a Specialty 

2843-45 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Covering lntermountain and Pacific Coast States 

G. C. GILLAN 

UNDERH1LL 2727— HEMLOCK 15 13 
517 Mdse Mart Market at 10th St. San Francisco 

CHAS. P. HART TRANSPORTATION CO. 

LOUIS HART, District Manager 
1629 S. Alameda Street PR. 5443 Los Angeles, Calif. 

1025 Tennessee Street VAlencia 9521 San Francisco, Calif. 

General Potato 8C Onion Distributors, Ltd. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 
216 DRUMM STREET PHONE SUTTER 2845 

SHORB ENGINEERING 

MACHINISTS — TOOL MAKERS — ENGINEERS 

N. N. SHORB 

202 Creen Street Phone GArfield 1602 San Francisco 



LUCKY STRIKE 
MEANS FINE TOBACCO 

BUSSELL PACKING CO. 

420 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

THE CALDWELL COMPANY 

Designers and Manufacturers of Women's and Misses' Dresses 
Ask for Them at Your Favorite Apparel Shop 

130 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

MANUFACTURERS 

KORET OF CALIFORNIA 

CREATORS OF LADIES' SPORTSWEAR 
WOMEN'S WORK CLOTHES 



611 Mission Street 



EXbrook 8723 



San Francisco 5 



ORTON MACHINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF WOODWORKING MACHINERY 
Endless Bed Surfaces Cutter Heads Special Machinery 

390 FREMONT ST. SUTTER 163 1 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill 8100 



KENYON SPENCER, INC. 

ELEVATOR SERVICE AND REPAIRS 



1173 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MOntrose 8694 

THE DIFFERENT BAKERY 

YOU CAN SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 
BUT OUR CAKES SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES 



92 5 TARAVAL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



J. J. MOORE & CO., INC. 

SHIPPING MERCHANTS 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



451 Montgomery Street 



Postal Zone 4 



San Francisco, Calif. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



"LIVING HEROES" 

( Continued from Page 5 ) 
immediately. It was all over in a few seconds. Our fire 
took effect and Warner fell fatally wounded. 

All we knew up to this time was that a shooting had 
taken place and, as I have already stated, we wanted to 
know what it was all about. It was only after we had shot 
Warner that we discovered the body of the dead officer; 
in fact, when our fire took effect, the body of Warner 
was lying almost side by side with the body of the dead 
police officer. 

Inspector Dave Brady here too\ up the story and de- 
clared : I believe that every other member of the San 
Francisco Police Department would have done the same 
thing as we did in a case of this kind. All you know is 
that a dangerous man is back of a deadly rifle. You know 
the job has to be done and done quickly. You don't pay 
any attention to death. You walk right in and come what 
may, you respond to the call. After all, the people of San 
Francisco depend upon us to protect them against gun- 
men, sane and insane, and we do that. If it is our lot to 
die in line of duty, we must submit to the inevitable; but 
living or dying, duty must be performed. 

Furthermore, a job such as the Warner one is all over 
in a few minutes. It was either he or ourselves, and we 
won. We do feel sorry, however, that Officer Ryan walked 
into the deadly trap without any advance knowledge of 
the dangers involved. We knew, of course, there had been 
a shooting and we went in fully prepared for any and all 
possibilities. I don't think there was any particular heroism 
attached to it. It was a case of police duty and every 
other policeman would have done the same thing. It so 
happened that the life of Officer Ryan was taken and 
ours were saved. 



Phone Richmond 670; Res. Piedmont 4358-J 



General Jobbing 



RICHMOND SHEET METAL WORKS 

H. A. Swearingen - Dave Kessler 

Heating and Ventilating - Cornices and Skylights 

549 PORTOLA RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone LAndscape 5-5788 

HUTCHINSON CO. 

CRUSHED ROCK - SAND - GRAVEL 

Rail or Water 

7360 SCHMIDT LANE EL CERR1TO, CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 6 

ANDERSON DRUG CO. 

"Sincere Service" 
601 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 4804 

McCOLLUM MORTGAGE CO. 

REALTORS 

W. W. HENRY, Jr., General Manager 
30 SAN PABLO AVENUE at Macdonald RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phones Richmond 2270; Res., Richmond 194 1 



INSURANCE 



HARRY PULSE 



Licensed Real Estate Broker 
Main Office: 1538 SAN PABLO AVE. EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Branch Office: 23 16 EAST SHORE BLVD. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Phone BErkeley 94 74 

AMERICAN ICE COMPANY 

ROSE and SHATTUCK BERKELEY, CALIF. 



QUALITY STATEMENT HEALTH 

FOX WATER COMPANY 

Pure Drinking and Distilled Water Service — Retail, Wholesale 

675 37th STREET OLympic 4680-4681 OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TELEPHONE TW1NOAKS 2 133 

NORMAN OGILVIE & CO 

REAL ESTATE 



1924 BROADWAY, RAY BLDG. 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



A. C. WINTER P. K. WINTER 

STANDARD DOUGHNUT CO 

"A BETTER DONUT" 
4095 Foothill Blvd, Oakland, Calif. Telephone KE 4-2011 

ACOUSTICON 

THE HEARING AID BASED ON U. S. GOVERNMENT 

DEAFNESS SURVEY 

W. E. DANIEL, Manager 408 14th STREET, OAKLAND 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

B. SIMON HARDWARE CO. 

808 to 824 BROADWAY 
GLencourt 7695 OAKLAND, CALIF. 

ALTA FREIGHT 8C TRANSFER 

706 HIGH STREET 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

M. B. McGOWAN, INC. 

PILE FOUNDATIONS— WHARVES— BRIDGES 

625 MARKET STREET 



GArfield 6879 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EDY'S GRAND ICE CREAM CO. 

3315 GRAND AVENUE 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

HEZLETT'S DRESS SHOP 

READY-TO-WEAR DRESSES — SUITS AND MILLINERY 

2277 Shattuck Avenue, Opposite United Artists Theater 

Telephone BErkeley 6010 Berkeley, California 

MEET YOUR BOY FRIEND IN OUR NEW PADDED CELL 

ROXY'S CLUB PLAY BOY 



58 19 FOOTHILL BLVD.. OAKLAND 



TWinoaks 996 1 



GREETINGS FROM 

PABST BLUE RIBBON BEER 

525 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
PHONE GARFIELD 6085 

GUS A. GEHLERT 

REPAIRING EXPERTS OF ALL KINDS OF 
WELDING AND CUTTING APPARATUS 



309 Clementina Street, San Francisco 



GArfield 2424 



Phone Mission 4640 



WINES AND LIQUORS 



GOLDEN GATE DISTRIBUTING CO. 

THOMAS B. RICKEY 

Wholesale Candies, Cigars and Cigarettes 
884 Valencia Street, at 20th Street San Francisco 



EXbrook 2235 



Geo. and Bess Shean 



SHEAN'S DEPOT CAFE 

ACROSS FROM S.P. DEPOT 



699 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone MOntrose 9867 



H. A. Haberman 



PARKSIDE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



1830 TARAVAL STREET, 
Between 28th and 29th Avenues 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID 
ASSOCIATION ELECTS OFFICERS 

The annual election of the San Francisco Police Wi- 
dows' and Orphans' Aid Association, held December 10, 
resulted in the following members of the Department 
being elected: 

President — Walter Sullivan, Company A. 

Vice President — Michael Reilly, Traffic Bureau. 

Treasurer — John Butler, Headquarters Company. 

Financial Secretary — Owen Fogarty, Headquarters 
Company. 

Recording Secretary — Matthew Carberry, Headquar- 
ters Company. 

Trustees — Arthur Garratt, Traffic Bureau; Sergeant 
John Meehan, Big Brothers Bureau; Herbert King, Traffic 
Bureau; Henry Smith, Property Clerks Office; James 
McGovern, Company D. 

George Langley of the Northern Station will be the 
Junior Past President after January 13, when the recently- 
elected officers are duly installed on that date. 



Phone HEmlock 603 7 



K. J. TURNER. Prop. 



K. J. TURNER COFFEE CO. 

ROASTERS - DEALERS 
Custom Roasting a Specialty - Route Men Serviced and Supplied 



Compliments of 

THOS. WILLIAMS GROCERY 

Choice Imported and Domestic Groceries 
701 GUERRERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

FRANK'S MARKET 

DALMAU BROS. 

Fresh and Salted Meats - Fish and Poultry - Groceries, Fruits 

and Vegetables - Wines, Beer and Liquors 

2500-2510 SAN BRUNO AVENUE 
Phone DOuglas 7685 

L. & L. MARKET 

Vegetables, Groceries - Wine, Beer and Liquors 
474 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 884 7 



Frank DeValle, Mgr. 



SPEEDWAY CAFE 

Italian Dinners - Cocktails - Fine Wines and Liquors 
98 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 8164 



Frank Hutton, General Mgr. 



SUNSHINE CURTAINS, INC. 

740 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Established 1868 150 Branches 136 Distributors 15,000 Dealers 

THE J. R. WATKINS COMPANY 

EXTRACTS SPICES SOAPS MEDICINES 

PERFUMES TOILET PREPARATIONS 

4512 HOLL1S STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 5620-5621 for Anything Pertaining to Real Estate 

RUBY BRYANT CO. 

"Property Management" 

4024 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIF. 



252 NINTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 425 1 



H. O. Vonder Mehden 



STOP! - SHOP! 

Foods of Quality - Delicatessen - Buffet Service - Party Service 
Luncheon Service - Roast Pheasant - Roast Turkey - Baked Ham 



1597 HAIGHT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 9600 JACK DUFF 

CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY 

Painting, Decorating and Building Washing 

480 ELLIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 3777 



M. MAGCIORA 



MATORI CREAMERY 



Quality Dairy Products - Instant Frozen Ice Cream 

"Taste the Difference" 



16291631 HAIGHT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: EXbrook 3368 - DOuglas 9785 Red Maloney Joey Fox 

MALONEY BAIL 

BAIL FURNISHED DAY & NIGHT 



Compliments of 

WESTERN IRON & BODY WORKS 



STEEL FABRICATORS 



I 165 67TH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-8012 



L. M. Kippley. Prop. 



KIPPLEY & LEE 

Auto Truck Engineers and Builders 
I8TH AVENUE and EAST I2TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phones: LAkehurst 2-3200 - 2-3202 

PALACE MARKET 

Fresh and Salt Meats - Poultry and Fish 

1208 LINCOLN AVENUE - BAY STATION ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

AL'S PLACE 

HOLMES & SEVOY 



1710 LINCOLN AVENUE 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



614 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO Phone LAkehurst 2-3344 



Phone UNderhill 6151 

CROWLEY COMPANY 

PLUMBING and HEATING 

1667 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



TAVERN 

Best of Liquor, Beer, Wine - Also Hot Lunch 
Where Good People Meet 



DUNFORD'S BEAUTY BAR 

13 11 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

KING PIN DOUGHNUT SHOPS 



12 00 EAST I4TH STREET 
TELECRAPH at CHANNING' 



SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 
BERKELEY, CALIF. 



1098 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

PETER BRADLEY 



PLASTERING 



1266 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

M. FRIEDMAN PAINT CO., INC. 

MOREWEAR PAINTS LAST LONGER 

Wall Papers - Window Shades 

568 I4TH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 




OPENING OF THE WESTERN ADDITION STATION IN THE EARLY '20s 
Extreme Right: The late Robert Coulter; and his Office force. 



Phone Richmond 367 



BEN SCHNEIDER 



MEN'S CLOTHIER and TAILOR 



626 MACDONALD AVENUE 



Phone SWeetwood 2800 T. R. Bill 

STANDARD TRAILER CO. 

Semi-Trailers, Full Trailers, Logging Dollies, 6-Wheel Attachments 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 4 15 SAN LEANDRO BOULEVARD 



Phones: Hospital KEllog 2-9172 

DR. E. A. RODIER 

Dog and Cat Specialist 

356 1 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 3917 Residence Fillmore 75 74 

Buy Coal and Wood While It's Still Available 

GOLDEN GATE COAL CO. 

Sutter D. Sefan, Prop. 
425 DE HARO STREET 

Between I 7th and Mariposa Streets 

Phone EXbrook 5 153 

BEAUTY SHOP SUPPLY CO., INC. 

LOS ANGELES - HONOLULU - SAN FRANCISCO 



Resident KEllog 4-5202 Phone SWeetwood 4420 



THE E. JAMES NURSERY 

PLANTS, SEEDS AND BULBS 



8715 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



5 1 FIRST STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone SUtter 4365 

PHILIP F. EWALD 

AMERICAN OPTICAL COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Credit Manager 
2 5 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Compliments of 

SANDUSKY'S INDIAN TRADING POST 

323 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 

Richmond Clothing Manufacturing Company 

Men's Union-Made Clothing, Slacks and Uniforms 



Phone TEmplebar 483 7 

SHEA DRUG COMPANY 

Prescription Pharmacists - Pure Drugs - Rubber Sundries 

1593 MADISON STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Associate R. WALLACE DOIG 

FRED F. T. WATSON, Optometrist 

. . . At . . . 
CALIFORNIA OPTICAL CO. OF OAKLAND 

1619 BROADWAY OAKLAND, CALIF. 



K. & L. DRUG CO. 



123 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 
3 105 WEBSTER STREET 



Phone TWinoaks 3700 
Phone HIgate 4060 



Phone Kellog 2-9409 



Open Day and Night 



OLD PERK RESTAURANT 

ON FRUITVALE AVENUE 
14 16 FRUITVALE AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone Piedmont 9454 

JOE'S GATE 

Joe Thomas, Arthur, Sandstron, Mixologists 



322 SEVENTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



5696 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phones Richmond 700 - 466 



Day and Night Service 



Phone: Office BErkeley 4090 



Residence THornwall 2885 



OWL TAXI 



UNION DRIVERS 
Main Office: 



250 FIFTH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



CLEAR FLOW 

DEPENDABLE VALVES 

George A. Plummer, Manager 

13 30 SECOND STREET BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, J 943 




S. F. POLICE DEPARTMENT AUTO DETAIL IN THE 1920's 
Captain of Inspectors Bernard McDonald, third from left front row, was in charge of this crew. Inspector Mili\in, 
first front row; Inspector Fran\ Brown third second row; Inspector fames Pearl, fifth second row; and Inspector 
Nicholas Barron, center rear row, have passed on. Inspector William Gilmore, fourth first row, is now in charge. 



Phone DOuglas 9396 



E. Polidakis Phone SUtter 9925 



Martin Fuchslin, Prop. 



OLD GLORY CLUB 

Entertainment and Music Nightly 

We Serve Quality Liquors, Wines and Beer 

2 76 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 94 75 

VON'S FOOD CENTER 

All Kinds of Vegetables and Groceries 

495 SANCHEZ STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



25 Cents Per Day 



25 Cents Per Night 



AUTO PARK 



Weekly Rates and Monthly Rates 
73 1 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 1432 

ACME LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers of Leather Accessories for Mechanics 

1701 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



MONTANA HOTEL-INN 

336 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EXbrook 97 10 

VICTOR TOGNOZZI TAVERN 

Best of Liquor - Spaghetti a Specialty 
283 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 5718 

BIG HORN TAVERN 



Where Good Fellows Meet 



2898 16TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 43 34 



We Call For and Deliver TARPAULINS 



C. & M. CUSHION & TOP SHOP 

We Specialize in Heavy Duty Truck Seat Cushions 
Auto Seat Cushions - Prompt Service 



I I 10 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 5 166 



Mr. and Mrs. Otto Leonard 



Phone HEmlock 6838 



E. P. Finigan 



OVERTON HOTEL 

Reasonable Rates - Day and Night Service 
378 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



E. P. FINIGAN CO. 



Manufacturers of Gymnasium-Playground and 
Swimming Pool Apparatus 



3 14 TWELFTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



CHIEF E. RAYMOND CATO 

(Continued from Page 1 1) 

where the hazards to highway traffic are practically 
removed. 

There has been a tendency, generally, on the part of 
the motorist to cooperate with traffic control in this war- 
time emergency. However, it is interesting to note that a 
great many motorists who are engaged in work at the war 
industries act as if they felt they were privileged to drive 
their vehicles as they please. Some of our courts, apparent- 
ly, are of the same opinion, that these workers should be 
excused when cited before them. This is all regrettable 
and no good can come by permitting such a condition. We 
believe that the war worker should observe traffic regula- 
tions in the same manner as other motorists are required 
to do. Otherwise, by his conduct, he will cause absenteeism 
and man-hour losses through highway accidents to a 
greater extent than would be by being compelled to com- 
ply with regulations and suffer the same penalty for traffic 
violations as other motorists. 

An interesting observation counter to the war workers' 
traffic problem is that of the personnel of the armed 
forces. It is our observation that the personnel of the 
armed forces is complying with traffic rules and regula- 
tions far better than is the war worker, and for a good 
reason no doubt our Army and Navy exact this compli- 
ance and respect for civil law. 

Should a member of the military be reported for civil 
law violations by a civil officer to his commander, through 
the channels that are provided, he is certain to experience 
a severe penalty. The cooperation afforded civil authority 
by the military has brought about a healthy respect on the 
part of the soldier, on furlough or leave from his post, for 
civil authority and a compliance with traffic rules and 
regulations. 

Regardless of the effort set forth by all traffic officers in 
this state, highway casualty is far too great as yet. During 
1942 a total of 52,000 persons were either killed or in- 
jured in motor vehicle crashes on California highways, in 
comparison with the losses experienced by the armed 
forces over this same period, which exceed very little the 
highway casualties as reported during the same period. 
These losses on the home front are just as damaging to 
our war effort, if not greater, than the casualties experi- 
enced on the battlefront. 

The drinking driver continues to be a menace on the 
highways of California, and while there has been a de- 
crease in accidents in injury and death generally through- 
out the state, there has at the same time been an increase 
in the number of automobile crashes involving an intoxi- 
cated person. This may have something to do also with the 
increase in the hit-and-run driver, as we feel that, as has 
been proven, the person who realizezs that he has imbibed 
too freely to be permitted to drive an automobile, and 
while in this condition does have an accident, responds to 
his first impulse to flee from the scene of the crash and 
conceal himself from his victim and the authorities. The 
drunken driver and the hit-and-run are real problems of 
enforcement duty and a situation which a satisfactory 



Compliments of 

WILSON & KRATZER 

MORTUARIES 



B1SSELL AVE. at SEVENTH 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 
Phone Richmond 3 700 



616 SAN PABLO AVE. 

EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Phone L And scape 5-1 155 



Phone Richmond 3 763 



BASIC SCIENCE SYSTEM 



DR. J. C. SCHIVELEY, D. C. 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Tuesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Closed on Saturday 



629 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Mission 2098 



Our 37th Year 



CHRISTOPHE'S 

GUARANTEED RADIO SERVICE 

Radios and Repairing - Records and Albums 

Musical Instruments - Art Goods 



2388 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 



Compliments of 



HENRY SCHALDACH 



233 SANSOME STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



j. w. McAllister co. 



1200 VAN NESS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MANNING INC 



COFFEE and TEAS 



MONADNOCK BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 5600 



DOHRMANN HOTEL SUPPLY CO. 



972 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



solution to combat has not yet been definitely attained. 

There is not a police agency in this state that has not 
experienced a loss in its personnel to the armed forces of 
our country. The majority of the officers thus entering the 
armed forces have volunteered their services. Selective 
service has taken a goodly number in addition. It is our 
experience that it is almost impossible to fill these vacan- 
cies due to the high standard set for the police service in 
this state and the extreme scarcity of manpower. 

It has been found expedient where possible to solicit the 
cooperation of military police and Naval shore police. 
In the Patrol we have augmented our manpower and 
service materially in this way by the assignment of a 
military policeman or a shore patrolman to each night 
patrol car, particularly is this true on strategic highways 
and bridges. We have found the military and Navy very 
cooperative where it is possible to render this service. 

The presence of the military with the civil officer has 
a very satisfying effect when any disturbance or violation 
involves another member of the military or Naval person- 
nel, and also frequently expedites the handling of the 
situation where the armed forces' representative can read- 
ily take care of the situation without further incarceration 
or court appearances which would have been made neces- 
sary should the civil officer have been working alone. 

Auxiliaries built up of men in all walks of life are 
well trained to render assistance should dire emergency 
be visited upon us. Yet it is our belief that without suffi- 
cient personnel of tried, true and experienced peace offi- 
cers, it will be extremely difficult to handle an incident of 
grave emergency as efficiently as it would were our peace 
officer power on a par with that which the urgency 
justifies. 

The entire matter of wartime traffic control and the 
traffic officer demands the exercise of patience and fore- 
bearance on the part of all interested agencies and per- 
sons in these critical times. The best job is being done 
with the tools that are the disposal of the enforcement 
agencies. We bespeak the whole-hearted moral support 
and assistance of our citizenry to the end that every man, 
woman and child in this great state will enjoy that sense 
of security justly ours in a free nation. 



JUDGE THERESA MEIKLE 

( Continued from Page 1 2 ) 

preservation or rehabilitation of that unit. 

7. A central bureau for the dissemination of informa- 
tion by way of direction of both parents and youths who 
are facing a social problem. This central bureau taking up 
the problem should carry it through, or see that it is car- 
ried through, until the inquirer arrives at the right place, 
without being sent from one agency to another. 

8. Continuation of the present program for recreational 
facilities, boys' and girls' clubs throughout San Francisco, 
and enlargement of the child-caring agencies in propaga- 
tion of work for rehabilitation of home life generally. 



Phone KEllogg 3-2541 

RUCKSTELL CALIFORNIA SALES CO. 



Division of 
O. R. PETERSON CO., INC. 

Manufacturers 



2985 FORD STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



B. P. JOHN FURNITURE CORP. 



860 8IST AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALiF. 



Compliments of 

RICHMOND BOWLING COURTS 



24th and MACDONALD STREETS 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 

TODD'S CLUB 

COCKTAILS and DANCING 
2068 SAN PABLO AVENUE EL CERRITO. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 768 

JOHN EKLUND CO. 

A. F. IVEACH 
FEED - FUEL - GARDEN SUPPLIES 

1636 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phona Richmond 3 182 



(ANDY) ANDREW B. GEORGE 



GEORGE BROS 

BEVERAGE DISTRIBUTORS 



2 1ST STREET and CHANSLOR AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phone Richmond 2420 



C. G. STE1NER. Manager 



HOTEL CARQUINEZ 



TENTH STREET and NEV1N AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Compliments of 



SIGNAL OIL COMPANY 



1330 16TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GLencourt 5 128 

Compliments of 

PARKER & SCOTT — Realtors 

Specializing in Oakland Homes 
536 LAKE PARK AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



Compliments 
of 

HENRY DOELGER 

BUILDER 



Atlas Imperial 
Diesel Engine Co. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




Kerosene Oil 
Heater Service 

All Perfection Heater parts 
in Stock. 

Founts, Pyrex globes, wicks, 
etc., etc. 

Heater Exchange 
Bill Dix 

631 BROADWAY 

Phone TWinoaks 3567 OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone MArket 1390 - RAndolph 4942 Estimates - Day or Contract 

W. G. THOMPSON 

PAINTER and DECORATOR 

Member Builders Exchange 
1707 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone HEmlock 3533 Elyse Forni 

CALIFORNIA WINE 8c LIQUOR CO. 

Imported and Domestic Liquors - Wholesale and Retail 
Pride of California Brands - Cala-Forni Brandy 

1553 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WHILE WE WERE YET SINNERS. 
CHRIST DIED FOR US. ROM. 5:8 

GUS. A. RENKERT 

GUS' GARAGE 



ARREST that old Mattress 
get an AIRFLEX 

You'll get deep, luxurious sleep on this sensitive, 
long-wearing mattress . . . and save money too! We 
sell direct to you at the manufacturers' price when 
you buy at our manufacturing store. Save from #5.55 
to #25.50. Mattresses from #10.95 to #49.50. Budget 
terms. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



*•*•••••***•****++*+**+********.***.<,.*** 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks. 

Home of Thrill-Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants 
fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

WHITNEY BROTHERS 



liloulj, & 


fff 


Jewelers 


Diamonds, W ate hi 


's, Jewelry 


Expert Watch 


Repair 


Richmond 954 


602 McDonald Ave. 


Richmond, Calif. 



I 
Invest Your Money in War Bonds 

| 
Pay Cash and Save at 5 

WEINSTEIN CO. I 

1041 Market 615 Market 119 Post 
100 Market 1620 Polk St. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 



INSIDE SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 
ASSOCIATION INCORPORATED 

By George William Wood 

The enthusiastic membership of the Inside Special 
Police Officers' Association, Inc., now numbering 350 
members, is causing it to grow by leaps and bounds. The 
personnel of this fine group of Special Police Officers 
reflects the careful selection of its members. As a body of 
men, serving a special and specific line of work, makes it 
a valuable coordinating influence, in the Police Protec- 
tion of our city. 

The President, Thomas J. Lynch, speaks highly of the 
work that is being achieved by his association. It was a 
fine gesture of confidence the Association Membership 
expressed to him, for his indefatigable work among them, 
when it unanimously requested that he aspire to and run 
for the Vice Presidency of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association of the San Francisco Police Department, 
which election took place December 10th. 

The many years in which he has been a valuable mem- 
ber of this association has made clear to him its vital aims 
and needs. His splendid work as a leader of men, as well 
as an organizer, has proved that no one could be more 
highly fitted for nor more able to fill that august office 
than Thomas J. Lynch. 



RHODES & JAMIESON, LTD. 

FOOT OF 23rd AVENUE 
OAKLAND 4, CALIFORNIA 



Alameda County-East Bay Title Ins. Co. 

In Business Continuously Since 1861 
14th and Franklin Streets GLencourt 2070 Oakland, Calif. 



C. S. BENNETTS 



T. W. CILBOY 



GILBOY AGENCY 

WHOLESALE MAGAZINES 
2400 Filbert Street, Oakland, California 

SCOTTY'S PONY MARKETS 

U. S. Government-Inspected Horse Meat for Human Consumption 

Five Convenient Stores — 607 Washington, 3329 Lakeshore and 5914 
MacArthur. Oakland; 3171 College, Berk.; 8th & Barrett, Richmond 

GARDINER MFG. COMPANY 

DROP . . . UPSET . . . HAMMER FORGINGS 



2707 Union Street, Oakland 7, Calif. 



TEmplebar 7823 



GLencourt 6321 

THE UNION ICE COMPANY 

SAVE WITH ICE 



990 22nd Street 



Oakland, California 




TRAFFIC BUREAU IN THE LATE '20s 
The late Captain Charles Goff (center first row) was in charge. 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



(f 



Telephone Martinez 886 
Telephone Richmond 2513 
Residence Telephone 3277 

Bernice A. Andrade 
Secretary-Treasurer 

• 

BARTENDERS AND CULINARY 

WORKERS 595 

Affiliated with the 

American Federation of Labor 



729 CASTRO STREET 
MARTINEZ - - CALIFORNIA 

607 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND - - CALIFORNIA 



'jsa-sa 



J 



I C. T. 

Trailer Park 

50 Excellent Spaces 
BUTANE GAS STATION 



1821 SAN PABLO AVENUE 
EL CERRITO, CALIF. 

Telephone Richmond 2652 



BLOCK 

Sportswear 



<^mptr* 



Made in California 
by 

H & L BLOCK 

1653 MISSION STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phone HEmlock 1933 



F. W. Kingdon 



UNITED SERVICE COMPANY 

Cleaners of Carpets, Rugs, Upholstery - Moth and Flame Proofing 
Rugs Cleaned on Floor — Home and Office 



969 NATOMA STREET SAN 


FRANCISCO 


Compliments of 




DAVE'S AUTO PARK 




114 SEVENTH STREET SAN 


FRANCISCO 


Phones UNderhill 1261-1262 




T. J. TOPPER COMPANY 

Hotel and Restaurant Kitchen Equipment 

1089-1091 MISSION ST., Opposite Post Office SAN 


FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 1858 Lee Bauer E. W. (Monty) Larsen 

LEE-MONTY GARAGE 

Storage Capacity 150 Cars - Complete Garage and Repair Service 
1023 MISSION STREET near Sixth Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 0220 



Geo. Cadenasso 



Fred Kaiser 



MASTER REPAIR SHOP, INC. 

Specializing in 
Gas & Diesel Trucks -Lumber Carriers - Conveyors & Trailers 

145 ELEVENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

HOLIDAY CREET1NCS 

H. R. MASER 



133 7 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 









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. 





CHINATOWN SQUAD WHEN THE "JOURNAL" WAS FIRST STARTED 

Inspector John J. Manion (center front row) has been in charge ever since. 



You are invited to join the 

1944 Christmas Treasure Plan 

of The San Francisco Bank 

Open your account in person or by mail today 
at any office of this bank. 



Prepare now to give War Bonds in 1944 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS TRUST 

Incorporated February 10, 1868 • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

SEVEN OFFICES— EACH A COMPLETE BANK 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



Compliments of 



CALIFORNIA 

SPRAY CHEMICAL 

CORPORATION 




RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

Soule Steel 
Company 



1750 ARMY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 




SAN QUENTIN BREAKERS IN TOILS AGAIN 
Chief Charles Dullea, second front row; Inspectors James Johnson and William McMahon, and Lieutenant James 

Maloy of Robbery Detail. 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



December, 1943 




BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION TWO DECADES AGO 

Sergeant Emmett Hogan, second from left in front row, was in charge. Inspector Timothy Bur\e, first from left in 

bac\ row, is now in charge. 



Phones: Office. Richmond 730; Res., Richmond 5094 



Compliments of 



DINWIDDIE CONSTRUCTION CO. 



R. J. STEMPEL 

CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA [ 039 23RD STREET, at Hellings Avenue 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone Richmond I 02 



Mastercraft Tile and Roofing Co. 

Distributors and Applicators of 
JOHNS-MANVILLE PRODUCTS 



No. 1 20TH STREET 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



Phone HEmlock 9264 



QUALITY SERVICE 



Phone Richmond 45 3 



FRANK A. SILVA 



TOWN HOUSE TAP ROOM 

AND LIQUOR STORE 
No Better Spot in Town - Where All Good Fellows Meet 



329 TENTH STREET 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



RENON BAKING COMPANY 

FOR OVER 25 YEARS THE BEST 
UP - TO - DATE AND SANITARY 



Compliments of 



VICTOR EQUIPMENT CO. 



1330 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 844 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MArket 4181 B. W. Alberts 

Certified Upholstering and Furniture Co. 

INTERIOR DECORATORS 

Draperies, Rugs, Modernizing, Designing, Mattress-Renovating 

Custom Built Furniture 

23 75 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 5532 



J. Capozzi, Proprietor 



A-A PLATING WORKS 

Polishing and Plating of All Descriptions - Cadmium Plating 
1420 HARRISON ST.. bet. 1 0th «c I I th Sts. SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1943 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 




GUNMAN MEETS HIS WATERLOO 
Inspector Paddy Wafer, first on the left, and Inspector James P. Johnson, right, bring in bandit. Wafer is on the 

Robbery Detail now, and Johnson is with the Burglary Detail. 



J}0ittaij ©r^ttnga 



TO ALL READERS 



OF THE 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



December, 1943 




LARGEST GRADUATING CLASS FROM POLICE ACADEMY 
Front row, left to right: Sergeant George Duncan; Director of Personnel; George Healy; Chief Charles W. Dullea; 
Commissioners Walter McGovern, William P. Wohher and Ward G. Wal\up; Deputy Chief Michael Riordan; 

Captain John Engler; Captain Arthur Christiansen. 



Phones AShberry 3704-3705 



SUNSET MAUSOLEUM 



Phone Richmond 1804 



Gasoline and Oils 



TWO BROTHERS AUTO PARTS 



ASSOCIATION 

SUNSET DRIVE, OFF ARLINGTON BERKELEY, CALIF. 47TH AND PULLMAN AVENUE 



BUTCH and VAL'S 
Beer and Wine - at Two Brothers' Station 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



LEWIS A. STUCK, M. D. 

LATHAM SQUARE BLDG. 
OAKLAND 



1649 HAICHT STREET - Ph. HEmlock 2333 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GLEN-ELL'S CREAMERY 

FRESH DOUGHNUTS AT ALL HOURS 
Sandwiches - Salads - Ice Cream 

2199 MISSION STREET - Ph. MArket 6323 SAN FRANCISCO 

(OUR MISSION STREET STORE NEVER CLOSES) 



PUBLISHERS OF 



■flath- 






WEEKLY AND MONTHLY MAGAZINES 
COMMERCIAL WORK 
HOUSE ORGANS 
PAMPHLETS — BLOTTERS 



465 Tenth Street • MArket 71 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Telephones: Richmond 1048 
Ashberry 4468 



R. F. JOHNSON 
&SON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



2036 SAN PABLO AVENUE 
EL CERRITO - - CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Richmond 15 



Elmer J. Freethy 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



i 



1432 KEARNEY STREET 
EL CERRITO - - CALIFORNIA 



The 

MECHANICS 

BANK 




RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 
EL CERRITO ALBANY 



Phone TEmplebar 2300 



LAKE 



MERRITT 
HOTEL 




1800 MADISON STREET 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



StoW,Ne»sS d 

270 Claremont wv 
San Francisco, ^ 



Sec. 562, P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit 3172 



RADICH & BROWN 

General Contractors 



111 San Leandro Boulevard, SAN LEANDRO 
P. O. BOX. 166 Phone SWeetwood 7400 

3000 Burbank Avenue - - - BURBANK, CALIF. 

Phone STanley 7-1361 



Compliments of 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY COMPANY, Ltd. 

and 

PACIFIC METALS COMPANY, Ltd. 



3100 NINETEENTH STREET 
San Francisco, Calif. 



S/gRi Francisco 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 




AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Phones: Richmond 177 • Res. Richmond 2 170 



Compliments of 



L. H. FRASER, M. D. 



E. H. EDWARDS COMPANY 



2500 B1SSELL AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 200 BUSH STREET 



5AN FRANCISCO 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 

Phone Mission 4970 



Phone SUtter 04 75 



K. B. Morrison 



SUBMARINE SIGNAL COMPANY 

Boston. Massachusetts 



86 BEALE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones DElaware 7474-7015 HENRY C. MILLS ROY H. HINZ 



SMITH MARKET 



MILLS 8C HINZ TILE COMPANY 

(Formerly CUMMINGS & MORTON) 



900 22ND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 5945 MISSION STREET Office and Showroom SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 9310 



J. VON NOSTITZ, Prop. 



TECHNICAL FISHERIES CO. 



JULIUS' CAFE 



1332 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



5 32 KEARNY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Enterprise Engine and Foundry Co. 



Compliments of 

MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 



JUDSON-PACIFIC COMPANY 

STEEL STRUCTURES 

SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND 
CALIFORNIA 



Phones UNderhill 4310-11 John Traynor— Res Phone SKyline 4 75 5 p hones . MArket 5300-5301 

Charles Harcourt- — Res. Phone San Bruno 981 



OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 

Special Attention Given to Repair Work 

Manufactures of Tanks, Breechings, Smoke Stacks, Boilers, General 

Plate Steel Work, Water Filters — Softeners 

Dealers in Bo'lers, Engines, Pumps, Tanks, Etc. 

Oxy-Acetylene Cutting - Electric Welding 



OSTLUND & JOHNSON 

Manufacturers and Contractors 
Bank, Store and Office Fixtures 



550-558 EIGHTH ST., Bet. Bryant & Brannan SAN FRANCISCO 1901-05 BRYANT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



A Good Laundry 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 



SUPERIOR LAUNDRY 

S. ELIADES, Proprietor 



8 GRAND AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page I 



Featured in This Issue 

Page 

Chief Dullea Finishes Four Years as Head of 

S.F.P.D 3 

Chief John A. Greening to Retire 5 

Roger D. Lapham — Our New Mayor ... 6 

The Candid Friend Says 7 

By the Editor 

Inspector Proll Retires 7 

San Francisco's New Police Board 8 

More FBI Conferences 9 

Are Hopeful People Insane? 10 

By Opie L. Warner 

Marin County Peace Officers' Association . . 11 

District Attorney Edmund Brown 11 

J. M. Lewis Heads NCPCO Association ... 12 

Meetings of NCPCO Association 13 

Henry Bogardus Secretary NCPCO Association 14 

Chief Burke of San Mateo Dies 15 

It was a Quiet New Year's Eve in San Francisco 16 

Police Commissioner in Farewell Letter to 

Department 17 

Runaway Cars in San Francisco 19 

By judge Herbert Kaufman 

Try Your Hand at This List 20 

Help the Red Cross 23 

Lieutenant English to FBI School 25 

Captain Charles Skelly Back on Old Post . . 26 



Directory 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 
Telephones SUtter 2020 - 2030 
Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Roger D. Lapham 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

Hon. Jerd Sullivan, President Crocker First Nat'l Bank 

Hon. John Wesley Howell 240 Battery Street 

Hon. E. L. Turkington Furniture Mart Bldg. 

Captain Charles F. Skelly, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



CHIEF OF POLICE Charles W. Dullea 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Riordan 

Bur. of Inspectors..Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1341 31st Avenue 

Traffic Bureau Lt. Edward Pootel 635 Washington St. 

Acting Captain 
Dept. Sec't Capt. John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1631 32nd Avenue 
Director 

Bur. of Personnel Lieut. Georce Healt Hall of Justice 

Residence - 4028 18th Street 
Supervising Capt Arthur L. Christiansen Hall of Justice 

Residence - 1346 24th Avenue 
Director - Bureau of Criminal 
Information Lieut. Frank E. Winters Hall of Justice 

Residence - 670 41st Avenue 
Director - Bureau of 
Special Services Lieut. Emmet Moore Hall of Justice 

Residence - 2186 15th Avenue 
Inspector of Schools Traffic Control — Byron J. Getchell 

Residence - 533 Brussels Street 
Property Clerk John J. Wade Hall of Justice 

Residence - 200 Juanita Way 
City Prison Lieut. John J. Casey Hall of Justice 

Residence - 188 Liberty Street 
Central Capt. M. E. Mitchell... .63 5 Washington St. 

Residence - 1471 29th Avenue 

Southern Capt. John A. Reed 360 Fourth St. 

Residence -438 21st Avenue 

Harbor Capt. John M. Sullivan. Drumm k Comm'l Sts. 

Residence- 407 5 26th Street 

Mission Capt. Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Residence - 170 Beaumont Street 

Northern Capt. Aloysius I. O'Brien 841 Ellis Street 

Residence - 2610 Sacramento Street 

G. G. Park Capt. Alexander E. McDaniell G. G. Park 

Residence - 124 San Aliso Avenue 

Richmond Capt. Francis J. McGuire 451 Sixth Ave. 

Residence - 758 Tenth Avenue 

Incleside Capt. Leo J. Tackney Balboa Park 

Residence - 2533 18th Avenue 

Taraval Capt. Patrick J. Murray 2348 24th Avenue 

Residence - 1630 Portola Drive 

Potrero Capt. Michael Gaffey 2300 Third Street 

Residence - 3920 26th Avenue 

Headquarters Capt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Bayview Sub-Station 1676 Newcombe Avenue 



When In Trouble Qall SUtter 20-20 

W IXCYI Lid UOtiOt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



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! San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



Vol. XXI 



FEBRUARY, 1944 



No. 6 



Chief Dullea Finishes Four Years as 
Head of S.F.P.D. 



On February 15, Chief of Police Charles Dullea com' 
pleted his fourth year as the head of the San Francisco 
Police Department. He starts his fifth year under a new 
administration which has announced there is no intention 
of changing at this time. 

During the past year, Chief Dullea has felt the full 




Chief of Police Charles Dullea 

effects of the war on his native city, which is increasing 
daily in importance as an embarkation point, with untold 
numbers of fighting men being sent to the Pacific war 
fronts, with similar untold numbers of vessels carrying 
supplies so necessary to these Pacific fronts. He has seen 
the population swell daily with people from all over the 
United States, coming here to engage in essential war 
work. He has seen our housing facilities taxed to the break- 
ing point, yet he has continued to give to the people of this 
city police service that makes this city a white spot among 
all American metropolitan cities. Crime has been kept 



at a minimum point, even less in many instances than in 
normal times. 

There has been no outbreaks of robberies, burglaries, or 
thievery of other kinds. He has practically stamped out 
organized prostitution, and has won high governmental 
officials' hearty commendation for his work in lessening 
venereal diseases, so dependent on prostitution. He has 
worked with heads of the Navy, the Army, and the Ma- 
rine Corps in a manner that has brought a closer spirit of 
cooperation than has even existed in previous wars. He has 
maintained a complete coverage of the entire city of foot 
patrolmen and radio car patrol officers, and these, with 
his highly efficient Bureau of Inspectors, have brought to 
the bars of justice those who sought to make a living the 
illegal way. 

Chief Dullea has accomplished all these things in the 
face of the arrival of many newcomers with nearly 200 less 
officers on his force than he had when the war broke out. 
There has been 198 members of the department taken into 
our armed forces and they are scattered around the globe. 

Yet those men who remained have taken the added load 
and performed in a manner that reflects great credit to the 
personnel of the Department. 

The San Francisco Police Department has worked in 
closest cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion and the peace officers of California cities and counties. 

Chief Dullea's Department has apprehended many 
wanted criminals for "outside" jurisdictions. It is a cardi- 
nal principle of the Chief and his men to give proper 
attention to the appeals of police officials from other cities, 
for assistance in arresting wanted men and women, no 
matter how small the town or city might be. On numer- 
ous occasions since his incumbency, Chief Dullea has de- 
tailed members of his force to other cities and counties to 
assist in solving numerous crimes, and he has assigned 
specialists from the Inspectors Bureau to assist local offi- 
cers in many celebrations, football games, racing, and other 
sports. 

As an indication of his interest in law enforcement, the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police has made 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



him fifth vice president, and the State Peace Officers' As- 
sociation has him down for first vice president, meaning 
that this year, at the meeting to be held in Fresno during 
October, he will be elevated to the position of president. 



Chief Dullea, his top officials, and the rank and file of 
the Department have carried on in a manner that has won 
the city by the Golden Gate high praise from all sections 
of the United States. 




CHIEF CHARLES DULLEA RECEIVING GOLD LIEUTENANT STAR 
So well did he perform his work with the Auto Detail of the S.F.P. D., the Motor Car Dealers' Association sent a delega- 
tion, headed by their president, to present star when Sergeant Dullea was promoted to lieutenancy November 19, 1923. Left to 
right from Sergeant Dullea are the late Police Commissioner Jesse B. Cook, William L. Hughson, the late Colonel Culbertson 
(pinning star on coat), president of Association, the late Captain of Inspectors Duncan Matheson, Elliott Epsteen, attorney for 
Association, and the late Chief Daniel J. O'Brien. 



The law-abiding people of San Francisco have the great- 
est respect for their Chief of Police, and are well aware of 
his ability and of the manner in which he has approached 
the problems brought on by this world-wide war, and at 
the same time keeping crime at such a low level. 



The past four years, with all the turmoil of a global war, 
has found San Francisco a safe city to reside in, and Chief 
Dullea's many friends hope to see him continue to give the 
city the utmost in police protection during the years to 
come. 



The following order was issued by Chief of Police 
Charles Dullea the first of the year: 

"Effective January 14th, Company Commanders shall 
call the attention of all Station Keepers and Prison Keepers 
of their respective commands to the new Procedure which 
will be followed by the District Attorney, Edmund Brown, 
in issuing bail orders and orders of discharge. 

"The new form will supplant the old white receipts and 
blue orders of discharge, and contains information thereon, 
which is self-explanatory. Station Keepers and Prison 
Keepers shall only concern themselves with the information 



on the bail receipt and order of discharge, wherein the same 
applies to their respective duties. 

"In an instance where a defendant is booked on more 
than one charge, it will be the policy of the Deputy of the 
Warrant and Bond Office to issue a single receipt on which 
will be listed the amount of bail for each particular charge. 

"In instances where arrests are made in gambling raids, 
which result in the arrest of a keeper and numerous 
visitors, one receipt ordering the discharge of the named 
keeper and the visitors will be issued. On the face of the 
discharge order will be listed the name of the keeper and 
on the reverse side will show the names of the visitors." 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Chief John A. Greening to Retire 



The announcement that Chief of Police John A. 
Greening of Berkeley has asked for a pension, effective 
July 1, brings a feeling of regret from many peace officers 
of this state and nation. While all realize he has justly 
earned his retirement, the men he has been associated with 
since 1911 with the Berkeley Police Department, 12 years 
of which he was the commander, feel they will miss his 
constructive and freely-given advice and council. 

It is the lot of but few Chief of Police to rise to the 
prominence as has Chief Greening. An apt pupil of former 
Chief August Vollmer, Chief Greening continued his 
work of raising police work from the skull-busting, rib- 




Chief John A. Greening 

cracking methods of old-time policemen to skull work and 
outsmarting crooks by scientific methods and procedure. 

He was not afraid to try anything that promised to make 
the security of law-abiding citizens more assured. He de- 
veloped radio and obtained the best men in this field to 
carrying on this foreward step in law enforcement. He 
brought the Berkeley Police Department, through attract- 
ing young men with a background of higher education, to a 
high point of efficiency. 

He has taken over the re-organizations of many police 
departments in this nation, as well as in Honolulu. He has 
been called upon by Director John Edgar Hoover of the 
F.B.I, to set up half a dozen courses of study for the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation Police Academy in 
Washington, D. C. 

When this war started, a greater part of the routine 
details and the'plans for setting up a civilian defense 
throughout the state was delegated to Chief Greening, and 
the plans he brought forth have been the pattern for all 
other states that have had to face this problem. 

He has carried on an unrelenting campaign to get de- 
ferment for law-enforcement officers from the selective 
service authorities, and he has taken over important work 



on many committees of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, the State Peace Officers' Association, and 
the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association. He is now 
completing a term as president of the latter. 

When the matter of closer cooperation between the 
war agencies and the police in the matter of two-way 
radio communications. Chief Greening was called upon 
for his ideas and he has been instrumental in working out 
a setup for the use of law enforcement stations in coopera- 
tion with the Navy and Army in emergencies. 

Chief Greening has developed, through the use of ma- 
chines, a system of statistical reports that is universal in all 
up-to-date police departments. 

We know of no man who has contributed so much to 
the advancement of police work than Chief John A. 
Greening, and this writer joins with his legion of friends 
and admirers in wishing him many years as a "private 
citizen," and at the same time expressing the belief that 
it will be a difficult task for the Berkeley City Manager 
to find another man with his energy, his advanced ideas, 
his executive ability, and his loyalty to take his place. 



TRAFFIC WARNING NOTICES 

Effective January 8, 1944, the following orders went 
into effect in the issuance of Warning 7\(otices by mem- 
bers of the San Francisco Police Department : 

Warning notices are issued by officers assigned to the 
Accident Prevention Bureau, Motorcycle Detail and Offi- 
cers assigned to the Radio Patrol Car Detail. 

Officers are to bear in mind that new systems in no 
way curtails or mitigates the importance of issuing traffic 
citations to operators of motor vehicles involved in serious 
and flagrant violations of the traffic laws. 

Warning notices should only be issued in incidents in- 
volving moving violations of the traffic laws. The dif- 
ferentiating between the issuing of a Warning Notice 
and Traffic Citation should be determined in a great de- 
gree whether or not the violation was intentional or of 
a serious nature. . . 

Members of the department should become aware of 
the fact that traffic enforcement is a responsibility for all 
members of the department whether specifically assigned 
for traffic duty or not. 

Members of the department assigned to motorized units 
should be particularly alert in taking cognizance of moving 
violations of the traffic laws. It is one of the fundamental 
functions of a police department to protect life and prop- 
erty and to make every effort to prevent accidents. 

When an officer has observed a violation of the traffic 
laws, which in his opinion requires the issuance of a Traf- 
fic Citation, he should not vacillate in his judgment and 
compromise by issuing a Warning Notice. On the other 
hand, he should also bear in mind that the great majority 
of traffic violators are noncriminal and their offenses are 
(Continued on page Z5 ) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



Roger D. Lapham — Our New Mayor 



San Francisco started the year 1944 with a new Mayor. 
Roger Dearborn Lapham was installed as our Chief Ex- 
ecutive amid colorful ceremonies on January 8, in the 
rotunda of the celebrated City Hall. He is the third Mayor 
San Francisco has had in over 30 years. 

Mayor Lapham carried on one of the most unique 
campaigns ever held for public office in this city, and we 
doubt if one like it was ever held in any other metropolis. 
He first announced he would serve but one four-year term, 
and he followed this up with widely proclaiming he knew 
nothing of politics and if he would be elected he would 
conduct the affairs of the city as a business enterprise, 
appointing outstanding men and women to important com- 
missions and appointive offices. Throughout his campaign 
he maintained a dignity and kept free from any personal 
attacks on his opponents and he walked in with a plurality 
that astonished many people of San Francisco. 

During his first month as the head of the government 
of this city and county he has carried out his pledges as 
far as giving the city a business administration and ap- 
pointing outstanding citizens to help him in his determina- 
tion to give this area the best in governmental efficiency. 

He has sought to give each of the many diverse organiza- 
tions that make up our population a representation on the 
various boards. 

He has obtained men, successful in professional, busi- 
ness, industry, and labor activities, men who in the past 
shied at any such dubious honors to accept various ap- 
pointments. All commissioners under Mayor Angelo J. 
Rossi's regime tendered their resignation, except those 
whom the charter provides for a definite term. 

He has taken up, already with a zest surprising for a 
man who has never had any previous political experience. 
He is tackling our City's No. 1 problem — transportation, 
and at the same time he has displayed a ready grasp of 
other almost as important problems. 

As a magazine published in the interest of the San 
Francisco Police Department, the San Francisco Police 
and Peace Officers' Journal, though highly pleased at the 
manner our new Mayor is tackling his overall job, it is 
exceptionally pleased at his handling of the Police 
Department. 

Commissioner Walter McGovern submitted his resigna- 
tion a couple of weeks before the installation of Mayor 
Lapham. Commissioners Ward Walkup and William P. 
Wobber called on the Mayor shortly after he took office 
and presented their resignations. They were commended 
by Mayor Lapham for the manner they had served the city. 

Then Mayor Lapham announced he had appointed Jerd 
Sullivan, vice president of the Crocker National Bank, 
and a young man who has displayed great and constructive 
interest in civic affairs, to serve as president of the Police 
Commission. 

His second appointment was John Wesley Howell, 



former head of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
and a shipping executive with the Matson Navigation Co. 

These new members met for the first time on January 
17 and changed the meetings of the Commission from 
Monday afternoons to Monday evenings, starting at 8:00 
o'clock. 

Later the Mayor announced the third appointee to com- 
plete the Police Board as E. L. Turkington, who was in 
Washington on government business as consultant for the 
W.L.B., and who took over his new post on January 31. 

Mayor Lapham announced there would be no change 
in the office of Chief of Police, and this sentiment was 
echoed by the new commissioners. 

When Mayor Lapham announced he intended to bring 
modern business methods into our city government, he 
was in a position to know what business methods are. He 
has been one of the most successful shipping men of this 
coast, with a reputation that extends to the eastern sea- 
board. In 1905, after graduating from Harvard University, 
he entered the service of the Hawaiian Steamship as a 
clerk. From this humble start he worked up to the presi- 
dency of the company in 2 5 yea«s, and, when he was 
elected Mayor, was chairman of the board. He was also a 
director of the Fireman's Fund Idemnity Co., American 
Trust Company, and the Del Monte Properties Company. 

After the war started, he was made a member of the 
War Labor Board, and so well did he perform in this post 
that President Roosevelt publicly proclaimed his ability 
and patriotism when he asked to be relieved of the War 
Labor Board work to run for Mayor. 

Though a top man in industry, he has not been unmind- 
ful of the rights of the people who labor, and on numerous 
occasions he has fronted for them and he has also met them 
as an opponent when he felt labor had gotten out of line, 
and by his forthright, honest, and fair opposition he made 
many friends among members of labor unions. 

San Francisco has a lot of new people in its limited 
confines, and before this war is over and after its end we 
are going to have a whole lot more, and it is pleasing to 
know we have a man holding the important post of Mayor 
so capable to handle many things that will develop before 
the war ends, and who will prepare this city for the post- 
war era. San Francisco seems pretty well set under the new 
regime, and everyone should back Mayor Lapham in his 
many undertakings. 

1 BACK THE I 

I ATTACK I 

: Buy War Bonds t 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

The Candid Friend Says 



Page 7 



By The Editor 



Now that all the arguments as to what questions were 
unequivocally true or unequivocally false are just mem- 
ories, in so far as the recent patrolman to sergeant exam- 
ination in our San Francisco Police Department is con- 
cerned, the one important thing that concerns all ranks up 
to top rank of would-be promotional material is what to 
study and how to do the studying for the next promo- 
tional examinations. 

The hit-or-miss system of getting ahead has gone forever 
in the police departments of the nation, just as it has in 
even the humble and the intricate daily endeavors of our 
teeming millions, in the matter of "earning thy bread by 
the sweat of thy brow" biblical edict. 

"We Got to be Good." Even our popular songs, with 
their catchy strains and words, preach this all-important 
business of preparedness to us. 

The men who were in the winning portion of the recent 
promotion lists of our local Civil Service Department, for 
moving up a step, thoroughly realize how tough, and 
painstaking and cruelly hard, the grind was to make the 
nitch they carved for themselves on that roll that leads to 
the top posts in the San Francisco Police Department. That 
is as it should be. Such tests make for the morale of the 
department as a whole. They certainly do mirror the atti- 
tude of the men who actually prepare for and take part in 
the tests, and, what is much more important, they give an 
individual an impartial appraisement of himself, and a 
definite standing with his co-workers. 

Civil service examinations have been the main factor in 
making the San Francisco Police Department what it is 
today — an outstanding and front rank police department 
in the nation. Today we find the department run by men — 
from Chief Dullea down to the most recently-appointed 
sergeant — who have come from the ranks through their 
individual intelligence, ambition and industry. The police 
thrillers in the cheaper magazines showing Patrolman Doe 
becoming Inspector Doe overnight are no longer available 
for the simple reason that publishers will not buy them. 
Today policing is looked on as a profession — and, as in 
other professions, it is strictly up to the individual to make 
his reputation — consequently the only correct criterion of 
ability is the rank held. 

The department has ample room for sergeants, lieuten- 
ants and captains. 

An ambitious young man who enters a department of 
some thirteen hundred men should forge his way into the 
first two hundred without many years of waiting. A 
glance at the recent list of eligible sergeants proves con- 
clusively that credits allowed for length of service do not 
offset intelligence and hard study. 

The Civil Service Commission has seen fit, in recent 
promotion examinations in the department, to omit the 
frills — tricky problems in arithmetic, et cetera — and to 



stress actual police knowledge, hence the man of just or- 
dinary education has just as good a chance of hitting the 
top of the list as the academic giant. In former promo- 
tion examinations it did really seem farcical to consider 
the synonyms, antonyms, grammar and mathematical 
posers set before the contestants, to wrestle with against 
time — three minutes to a typewritten page. Many fine 
candidates fell by the wayside on account of the above- 
mentioned frills — and probably an equal number did not 
even take the promotion tests through fear of the academic 
hurdles to be encountered. 

Now that safe and sane examinations are being pre- 
sented to our candidates for promotion it is to be expected 
that a much greater percentage of our men in the various 
ranks will study for and take the promotional examinations. 

Under the present system it definitely appears that the 
rules of the department, traffic and police ordinances, the 
rules of evidence; and, last, but looming out like Mount 
Shasta, the Penal Code, are the problems to be deeply 
and carefully considered. As in all professional tests, it 
is presupposed that candidates are familiar with general 
knowledge relating to police and policing. 

In the matter of general knowledge concerning the un- 
derlying principles of policing, there is, of necessity, con- 
siderable library work to be done. This, of course, does not 
mean intense study. Mere casual reading of books on 
criminology, police, policing, police statistics, and so on, 
will enable a candidate to handle any promotional ques- 
tions covering policing as a profession. The man who 
knows his book of rules, his ordinances and his penal code 
is the man who gets away up on the list. To get there 
means hard study, constant study — and some ability, of 
course. In my next article I will set forth a tried and true 
system of study as told me by a man who prides in his 
knowledge of the good old penal code. 



INSPECTOR PROLL RETIRES 

Inspector William Proll, for over 40 years a member of 
the San Francisco Police Department, took his pension last 
month. 

During his long term as a member, he has worked on 
some of the most important criminal cases of the past two 
score years. For more than thirty years he has been with 
the Bureau of Inspectors, being assigned to the Check 
Detail at the time of his retirement. But during the years 
he was a member of the bureau, he has handled many 
crimes that were of nation-wide interest. 

He was, prior to his Check Detail assignment, teamed 
up with the late Arthur McQuaide on the Banking 
Detail. 

He was an expert marksman and was an authority on 
explosives. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



San Francisco's New Police Board 



The new Police Commission of the San Francisco Police 
Department, appointed by Mayor Roger D. Lapham, has 
entered on the important duties of this important Board 
in a manner that is most promising. 

The Commissioners — Jerd Sullivan, president, John 
Wesley Howell, and E. L. Turkington — are successful 
business men, with a deep interest in the welfare of their 
home town. These men took over their new duties with 
the announcement that they were unfamiliar with the 
many ramifications of the Commission and naturally the 
Police Department. They indicated their intention to de- 
vote a lot of time to get better acquainted with their jobs. 



COMMISSIONER JERD SULLIVAN 

The first appointment of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners made by Mayor Roger D. Lapham was that of 
Jerd Sullivan, vice-president of the Crocker National 
Bank. In compliance with the expressed wish of the Mayor, 
Commissioner Sullivan was elected president at the first 
meeting of the newly-appointed Board. 

Commissioner Sullivan is a native of San Francisco, 
and comes from a pioneer family which has contributed 
much to the progress of the city. His father was the late 
Jeremiah Sullivan, identified with Theodore Roche in the 
practice of the law. During the administration of Mayor 






Commissioner Jerd Sullivan 



Commissioner J. Wesley Howell 



Commissioner E. L. Turkington 



Those who have observed these new appointees agree that 
they "catch on fast." 

This writer has seen a lot of police commissioners ap- 
pointed in this city who have served their city well, but 
none have excelled the present board in interest and de- 
termination to do a good job. 

They look upon the Police Department as a big business, 
which it is, and they are approaching the many problems 
of the Department on that basis. They are going into their 
work with the idea that every man of the personnel wear- 
ing stars of protection are honest, sincere, and giving the 
best of their ability. They will string along with the mem- 
bership until one or more show they did not measure up 
to the appraisment. Then that member, or those members, 
will be apt to find trouble ahead. 

It seems to be the policy of the new Commissioners to 
have the members of the Department stress education 
among the people of this city, the visitors, and newcomers. 

The Commissioners are doing everything they can to 
get better acquainted with the men under their jurisdic- 
tion, and each one will have visited all the outlying sta- 
tions and the various bureaus at the Hall of Justice, ad- 
dressing the men personally before many weeks pass by. 



James Rolph, his influence for the good of San Francisco 
was felt through the twenty years of the late beloved 
Mayor. 

Finishing his preliminary schooling in the city, young 
Sullivan went to the University of California, where he 
graduated. He entered the service of his country in World 
War I and saw duty overseas. Getting back from this trip, 
he became associated with the Crocker First National 
Bank twenty-four years ago. He rapidly progressed until 
he was made vice-president. He headed the California 
Bankers' Association in 1932-1933. 

Commissioner Sullivan, while identified with many civic 
movements, first gained favorable attention when he was 
foreman of the grand jury. He displayed a wide knowledge 
of his duties and he served out his year with a record that 
established him as a competent leader. He has taken an 
active part in political campaigns where he felt the can- 
didates he backed would mean better government for his 
native city if elected. He has never sought any political 
positions for himself, and it is for the purpose of helping 
Mayor Lapham in his program for giving San Francisco a 
high type of service that he accepted the appointment as a 
Police Commissioner. 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



The new President of the Commission is married, and 
Mrs. Sullivan is as active in contributing her services to 
any worth-while causes as has been her husband. She is at 
the present time taking a prominent part in the A.W.V.S., 
which is doing so much for the enlisted men of our war 
service. 

President Sullivan has demonstrated during the nearly 
two months on the Police Board that he is an able presid- 
ing officer and is fast mastering the details of the Police 
Department. 

• • • 

COMMISSIONER JOHN WESLEY HOWELL 

John Wesley Howell, the second member to be ap- 
pointed to the Police Commission by Mayor Roger D. 
Lapham, is the second citizen of that name to serve on the 
local board. The first was the late J. R. Howell, well- 
known realtor of the firm of Baldwin 6? Howell. He was 
appointed January 8, 1900, being on the first Board of 
Police Commissioners formed when San Francisco be- 
came a charter-operated city. Mayor James Phelan selected 
him, with three other outstanding citizens, to take over the 
Police Department under the new change in municipal 
government. 

The present Commissioner was born in Bisbee, Arizona, 
but, with his family, came to California when he was five 
years of age, settling in Los Angeles. The younger Howell 
went through the public schools of Los Angeles and then 
graduated from Stanford, with a license to practice law. 
He did not follow this calling very long, and during World 
War I he entered the service of his country. After finish- 
ing his war work, he landed in San Francisco and was so 
taken with the city that he has remained here ever since. 
He went to work for the Haslett Warehouse Company and 
is at the present time general manager of that large con- 
cern. He has served a term as president of the National 
Warehouse Association and two terms as president of the 
Chamber of Commerce— 1927 and 1938. 

He is married and has two sons, one with the Navy at 
Elizabeth, N. C, and the other in the Army, taking a 
training course for an officer's rank. 

Commissioner Howell has made an extensive study of 
the city ordinances, the police book of rules and regula- 
tions, and of the minutes of the Commission for years 
back, and has fortified himself with all the routine of the 
Department. 

• • • 

COMMISSIONER E. L. TURKINGTON 

E. L. Turkington is a native San Franciscan, having 
been born in this city 45 years ago. 

After finishing grade schools, he graduated from Lowell 
High School, where he was an outstanding athlete. After 
finishing high school, he enrolled at Stanford, but World 
War I came along before he graduated and he entered 
the service of his country, starting with a course in the 
navigation school and finishing up with a tank corps. 

After the end of the war he engaged in the wheat 
brokerage business, a line of endeavor he gave up to take 



over the duties of his late father-in-law, C. C. Horton, 
with the Healy-Tibbetts Construction Company. He had 
charge of the construction of the approaches to the San 
Francisco-Oakland Bay bridge, at both ends, quite some 
task for a young fellow to tackle. 

He remained with the Healy-Tibbetts Company until 
his family disposed of its interests. Just when he was figur- 
ing on taking it easy for a spell, the War Production Board 
a few months ago pressed him into service as a consultant, 
and he is now assisting here in that capacity in the San 
Francisco office. 

Because of his athletic prowess, he made the trip to the 
Olympic Games in 1924, when such outstanding athletes 
as Jack Patrick, Dick Hyland, and Officer James Mc- 
Eachran made the trip from this coast. 

Commissioner Turkington is the president of the St. 
Francis Homes Association and has been a member of the 
Olympic Club for 25 years. 

He is married and has two children, Miss Diana, 15, 
and Edward. 14. 



MORE FBI CONFERENCES 

The following notice has been sent by N. J. L. Pieper, 
Special Agent in Charge for Northern California, by 
the FBI: 

The FBI plans to hold another series of conferences 
starting February 14, 1944, and continuing through March 
3, 1944. At these conferences the following subjects are 
being discussed: 

Evidence Kit, Fraudulent Checks, Reference and 
Standards Files, Continuation of Laboratory Examinations 
With Further Attention to Paint, Glass, Soil Identifica- 
tions. (Particularly applicable to hit-and-run cases) Crime 
Scenes and Searches. 

Below is a list showing the time and place of each 
scheduled conference. Members of all law-enforcement 
agencies and organizations are cordially invited to attend 
at the one most conveniently located for you. 

February 21 — 1:00 p. m. — San Francisco — Show-up 
Room, Hall of Justice. 

February 21 — 7:00 p. m. — Oakland — Council Cham- 
bers, City Hall, 14th and Washington Streets. 

February 23 — 3:00 p. m. — Sacramento — Board Room, 
Basement Public Works Building. 

February 24 — 1 :30 p. m. — Oroville — Elks Hall, Meyers 
Street, between Bird and Robinson. 

February 25 — 10:00 a. m. — Shasta Dam. 

February 28—7:30 p. m.— Eureka— Little Theatre, 
Eureka Jr. High School, J and Del Norte Streets. 

February 29 — 7:30 p. m. — Ukiah — County Court 
House. 

March 1 — 7:30 p. m. — Santa Rosa — Junior College. 

March 2 — 1:00 p. m. — Vallejo — Council Chambers. 

March 3 — 2:00 p. m. — San Rafael — San Rafael High 
School Auditorium, Mission Street. 

Looking forward to seeing you at one of the confer- 
ences, I remain, Very truly yours 

— N. J. L. Pieper, Special Agent in Charge. 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Are Hopeful People Insane? 



February, 1944 



By Opie L. Warner 



Hope springs eternal in the human breast we are told 
by poets. Probably good, old dame nature figured that 
was best for the majority of the countless human family. 

Like everything that is good, there seems to be a catch 
somewhere in the gift of hope. 

Go up to Folsom and look over the transients and the 
permanent guests there, and a little investigation will re- 
veal the fact that they are over ninety per cent the vic- 
tims of hopefulness. The same goes for San Quentin, Sing 
Sing, Stillwater, Ft. Leavenworth, and Alcatraz. The 
short-termers, the tough guys, and the so-called big shots 
in those havens of dubious rest were just a trifle more or 
less too hopeful. 

Take the ones who are in some so-called "big house" 
for the third time. When he reviews his particular case 
with you he will prove to you conclusively that just the 
merest slip got him inside the walls the first time; his 
pal lost his nerve or his best gal got jealous of him, or he 
had the wrong hideout. During his first enforced vacation 
he had plenty time to think and to plan and to plot bigger 
and better ways of living the life of Reilly without putting 
in even forty hours a month. 

Yes, the second time he had everything fool-proof, but 
a "rat" who had been in with him the first time squealed 
on him to the cops — he'll get that rat though, if he has to 
swing for it ten minutes later. But this third time? Every- 
one knows the cops framed him. Why — didn't even the 
daily papers admit he was all set for a trip to Chicago and 
had his suitcases packed and had his ticket bought and 
everything when the cops closed in on him? And what 
kind of a lawyer did he have? The jinx had struck him — 
that was all there was to it. The prison board and the war- 
den and everyone knows it was a frame this time; but no 
more prison for him. No more pals — no more being a good 
pal or playing around. 

This time he will go it alone and go it big, and probably 
settle down. 

They are hopefuls, these dwellers within those forbid- 
ding walls. That may not be the reason for their first trip 
inside, but definitely it is the reason for their additional 
trips — for they are, as a class — first, last and all the time 
much too hopeful for their own good, if freedom is sup- 
posed to possess the mighty value attached to it down 
through the ages. 

Take the case of one H. D. Summers recently arrested 
here. He first landed in jail in Washington State, fifteen 
years ago, for forgery. 

Forgers and check passers generally must, of necessity, 
have imagination and be somewhat of an actor. Mr. Sum- 
mers adopted eight or ten names at various times during 
the past fifteen years, and strayed so far from his original 
name as to appropriate the names of Rogers, Wiley and 
Stoner — in addition to variations of his original name. 

In the matter of paroles he was pretty successful. He was 



twice in Washington State penitentiaries, and also spent 
terms in Folsom, Springfield, Tulare, Los Angeles, and 
Seattle prisons. His line is forgery, but he has been held on 
grand and petty theft charges, and on auto theft. 

Mr. Summers has been wanted by the Folsom authori- 
ties for the past two years as a parole violator. For the 
past year he has been wanted by the Oakland Police De- 
partment, and naturally the police on this side of the San 
Francisco Bay are consequently on the alert to see that a 
man of his importance is taken out of currency. 

Well, this worthy gentleman was here all the time. He 
had learned plenty in his long hours of meditation in 
various "pens" of this Pacific Coast and in midwest jails. 
He was just keeping away from the officers of the law, 
even though his parole principle contract was to let the 
officers of the law know that he was going along the 
straight and narrow path — this contract being especially 
pertinent in the case of the parole officer. Complete free- 
dom was what he wanted; no reporting to anybody as far 
as he was concerned. His plan was a good one and worked 
perfectly for a while — but it failed. Here is how it failed : 
His jinx just flew back and camped on his trail. That is 
his present explanation. 

Uncle Sam has been advertising for good men — civilians 
of non-draft age. The wages offered are really attractive 
and the food and housing conditions are away above nor- 
mal for a single man like our Mr. Summers, who, by the 
way, is a good mechanic, but who in this instance, for 
reasons best known to himself, applied for the unique 
position of pot washer. 

Well, Uncle Sam is a great believer in the finger print 
system. Thus if his employees or ex-employees become 
victims of amnesia, or try criminal impersonations — or ac- 
cidentally are found floating in the bay, minus identifica- 
tion marks — he is in a position to supply the correct in- 
formation. 

When Mr. Summers' prints were being taken as a result 
of his filing an application for the position of pot washer, 
his jinx must have been working overtime. He had con- 
versed with very many institution inmates who were 
"made" through those funny little dotted lines we carry 
so lightly on the tips of our fingers — but what could he do 
against that terrible jinx? His wariness melted away — he 
yielded to the suggestion of his jinx that the finger prints 
in this instance was merely a matter of form. 

Well, the San Francisco Police Department cooperates 
with Uncle Sam. The San Francisco Police Department has 
at least one million crime records. Inspector Timothy 
Burke and his staff are experts in the handling of these 
telltale fingerprints. 

Mr. Summers was doing fine and was free as air, and 
not worrying in the least about visits to the parole officers 
here or anywhere else. In his application for the job with 
(Continued on Page 18) 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Marin County Peace Officers* Election 



The Marin County Peace Officers' Association started 
1944 with a new set of officers. At the election held at 
the December meeting, the following were selected to 
conduct the affairs of the Association for 1944: 

President — Warden Clinton T. Duffy, San Quentin. 

First Vice-President — County Radio Technician J. 
Mansfield Lewis. 

Second Vice-President — Police Commissioner Thomas 
Wentworth, and a member of the State Highway Patrol, 
Corte Madera. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Judge John R. Flor, Larkspur. 




Warden Clinton T. Duffy 

In the selection of Warden Duffy to head the impor- 
tant activities of the Association, its members were indeed 
fortunate. Warden Duffy has a reputation as a penologist 
known throughout the nation, and it is a tribute to his 
understanding of the problems of law enforcement officers 
of this state that he should be selected as head of the Marin 
County Association. 

With him as their leader the Association will continue 
on the beam and carry on the splendid record achieved 
in 1943. 

As First Vice-President, Officer Lewis was a wise selec- 
tion. His work in perfecting the radio for enforcement 
work in his county has brought him in close touch with 
every officer of the law and he is highly thought of by one 
and all. 

Sergeant Wentworth has established himself as a capa- 
ble officer through his work with the corps of California 
Highway Patrolmen, and as a leader among men. He has 
contributed much to law enforcement as a Patrol Sergeant 
and as Police Commissioner of Larkspur. 

The guy who has to handle the details of any organiza- 
tion is the secretary. He must keep the records of meetings, 
arrange for place to meet, see that proper and entertaining 



programs are presented, and gather in the dues to carry 
on the work. 

The Marin Association has just such a man in the per- 
son of Judge Flor. So well has he fitted into the objectives 
of the organization that he has been elected for the third 
term to the office of secretary-treasurer. He has fixed ideas 
about law enforcement and is actively interested in ju- 
venile delinquency. He is one of the most popular as well 
as the hardest working members of the Association. 

The Marin County Association has more than met the 
demands made on the peace officers of the county by the 
large influx of shipbuilders in Marin since the beginning 
of the war. It is doubtful if there is any similar organiza- 
tion in the West that can match the success of this one. 

On the night of January 17 the first meeting of the year 
was held at San Quentin, with the new president, Warden 
Duffy, as host. 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
EDMUND BROWN 

District Attorney Edmund Brown, who was elected last 
November, by defeating Matthew Brady, who had been 
District Attorney for the city for 24 years, is making 
many changes in his office that is winning for him com- 
mendation from all quarters. 

With an almost new personnel, retaining a small part 
of his predecessor's force, he has instilled into his sub- 
ordinates his determination to give the maximum of serv- 
ice to the citizens of this city. 

He has changed the warrant and bond office into a 
presentable place to hear the complaints and receive bail 
monies. Private rooms have been provided, taking people 
from the old order of airing their troubles to the motley 
mob that crowded into the former open room. 

He has assigned special deputies to work with important 
bureaus of the Police Department. As an example, he has 
appointed Deputy Harold McGuire to work with the 
Homicide Detail. McGuire is called on, day or night, when 
a homicide occurs and sits in with the members of the Detail 
in every phase of the investigation and takes part in the 
questioning of suspects when such are brought in. 

He feels that his deputies should put in full time, and 
you will notice these appointees are on the job promptly 
at the hour they are supposed to be. 

District Attorney Brown takes an active part in many 
cases being handled by the Police Department and has an- 
nounced his intention to participate in the trials of de- 
fendants where he feels his presence is needed. 

The new district attorney is a son-in-law of the late 
Police Captain Arthur D. Layne, whose outstanding serv- 
ice will be remembered for many years to come. 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



J. M. Lewis Heads NCPCO Association 



James Mansfield Lewis, Marin County's radio techni- 
cian, newly-elected president of the Northern California 
Police Communication Officers' Association, is a pioneer 
in radio as applied to law enforcement. He has a splendid 
background in radio communications. He started his career 
in this line of work shortly after graduating from Tamal- 
pais High School in 1924, as a switchboard installer for 
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company in Marin 
County. 

He soon engaged in the radio and electrical business on 





J. M. Lewis 

his own account, handling the products of the country's 
largest concern dealing in radio manufacture. 

Seeing the future of radio in police work, he joined the 
San Anselmo Police Department in 1943 as a patrolman. 
Being radio-minded, he convinced the city authorities and 
his Chief, Donald Wood, of the possibilities of this great 
agency in law enforcement, and he was made radio 
technician. He was one of the first of the smaller cities to 
introduce two-way radio in the automobiles used for cov- 
ering the city confines. 

So successful was he in this undertaking that the Marin 
County Peace Officers' Association, of which he was a 
charter member, convinced the Board of Supervisors of 
the county that it would be a good idea to have all the 
automobiles of Marin used in enforcing the law adopt two- 
way radio. Lewis was appointed, in 1940, as the radio 
technician for the county, and he has developed two-way 
radio to a high state of perfection. In the late months of 
1941 Marin County's station KSRC was put in operation 
and today there are nine cities tied in with this source, 
servicing over 40 police and emergency automobiles. 

The station is located in San Rafael, with an automatic 
repeater station located on Mt. Tamalpais. 

Technician Lewis has been activily identified with the 
Northern California Police Communication Officers' As- 



sociation and his comprehensive knowledge of radio com- 
munications is highly appreciated by the members of that 
organization. He will keep at a high level reputation for 
achievements made by the organization since its inception. 



GOLDFISHNAPER NABBED 

Many are the ways a crime is solved, but we believe the 
following account of a report that came to the Police De- 
partment in San Francisco recently heads the list of novel 
ways. 

The story: 

Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Michaels manage an apartment 
house at 1457 Geary Street. Like many San Francisco 
people, they like pets and, because of the restricted quar- 
ters of an apartment house, they contented themselves with 
taking into their care four gold fish, which they placed in 
a swell glassed rectangular pool. They took a lot of 
pleasure in tending their pets. So much so that the fish be- 
came so tame they would stick their noses above water to 
take their food from the hands of Mr. and Mrs. Michaels. 

One morning Mrs. Michaels noted one of her pets was 
missing. There were no cats about and there was no dead 
goldfish on the lobby floor. She was broken up over the 
incident. 

That afternoon she happened into the apartment of a 
tenant and observed a nice round bowl filled with water 
and a goldfish floating unhappily at the bottom. She was 
sure it was her goldfish, so she made up her mind to call 
in the police. In the course of a few hours the "kick" 
reached Inspector Richard O. Hughes of the Burglary 
Detail. He called at the Michaels Apartment, got the story, 
and called in the tenant, a young man. This young man 
said he had bought the goldfish, but could not recollect 
where and, as all breakers of the law usually do, he got 
hjs tale pretty badly mixed up. 

After he got through telling his story, Mrs. Michaels, 
more than ever convinced of his guilt, spoke up and said : 
"See here," as she took a package of fish food out of her 
pockets and held it over the top of the fish bowl. Imme- 
diately the goldfish rose to the top, stuck its mouth above 
water, and took the morsel of food out of Mrs. Michaels' 
hand. "Now," said the landlady, handing another piece of 
food to the suspect, "you try it." The tenant took the 
offered food and held it over the bowl and the goldfish 
nearly broke its back running around the bowl under 
water. 

Inspector Hughes looked on in amazement, and then, 
turning to the young man, said, "you had better come 
clean." He did and Mrs. Michaels said she didn't want any 
arrests made, though Inspector Hughes has a hunch the 
goldfishnaper is not living at 1457 any more. 

The missing fish was restored to his three companions. 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

J. Mansfield Lewis, President 
Henry L. Bogardus, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held at the 
Alexander Hamilton Hotel, San Francisco, January 13, 
1944. Director Frank E. Winters was the host for the day. 
Luncheon was served at 12:30 p.m. President Burton 
called the meeting to order at 1:45 p.m., followed hy in- 
troduction of members and visitors. 

Minutes of the previous meeting were read and ap- 
proved. 

The Secretary and Treasurer read the financial report 
for 1943, which was very complete and satisfactory. 

Elecetion of new officers resulted as follows: J. N. 
Lewis, President; Manuel Trinta, Vice-President; Henry 
L. Bogardus, Secretary-Treasurer; Frank E. Winters, 
W. H. Harrington, Charles H. Gross, George K. Burton, 
Directors. The new officers were installed and meeting re- 
sumed with newly-elected President Lewis presiding. 

John N. Wood of San Mateo County Sheriff's office 
was elected a member. 

Mr. Lewis gave an extensive report on the work of the 
Radio Technical Planning Board, followed by general dis- 
cussion on the effect of the RTPB on police communi- 
cations. 

Resolutions Committee was appointed to draw up a 
resolution to be forwarded to the RTPB stating the atti- 
tude of the NCPCOA as regards the post-war status of 
police communications in this area. 

Motion by Burton, seconded by Harrington, to send 
resolution to Panel 1 3 RTPB meeting in Chicago on Janu- 
ary 20th. Motion carried. 

Motion by McKee, seconded by Kirby, to contact the 
California Police Radio Association representing South- 
ern California, for the purpose of arranging a joint meet- 
ing, possibly at Fresno, for a discussion of mutual problems 
and for joint representation on communication problems 
affecting the West Coast. Motion carried. 

Director Winters discussed the importance of auxiliary 
police and recognition of the work of the NCPCOA. 
Lewis also joined in this discussion. 

Motion by Le Boeuf, seconded by Burton, presenting 
request of Sheriff Dewey Johnson of Sierra County for 
clearance on 39380 kc FM. Clearance approved. 

Motion by McMurphy, seconded by Harrington, to hold 
monthly meetings at night. Motion lost. 

The amended rule of the FCC relating to service of 
emergency stations was generally discussed. 

There was also considerable discussion of the method of 
obtaining information from KADJ by Silva and Mc- 
Murphy. 



McKinney requested that the next meeting be held at 
Berkeley. This was accepted. 

The meeting adjourned at 3 : 30 p.m. 

Members present: Herb Becker, Ed Bertola, Henry L. 
Bogardus, G. K. Burton, C. H. Crese, W. H. Harrington, 
John J. Hartnett, John Hinkel, Ivan Hudson, J. D. Hos- 
sack, Henri Kirby, M. Le Boeuf, J. M. Lewis, Frank J. 
Matjasich, George S. Maxey, E. H. McKee, Lloyd F. Mc- 
Kinney, D. McMurphy, A. J. Morgenthal, E. S. Naschke, 
Leo M. Reese, Herman J. Schwandt, A. J. Silva, Art 
Sowle, W. V. Stencil, Opie L. Warner, H. M. Watson, 
Frank E. Winters, W. J. Wisnom, Donald T. Wood, 
Manuel Trinta. 

Visitors present: F. I. Deotken, John A. Lindquist, S. 
D. Wood. 

Approved as read : — Henry L. Bogardus 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

• • • 

The regular meeting of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association was held on Febru- 
ary 10, 1944, at the Elks Club in Berkeley, where Lloyd 
McKinney saw to it that we were well fed in Chief 
Greening's bailiwick. 

The meeting was called to order by President Lewis at 
1:35 p. m., followed by minutes of last meeting. All 
present were duly introduced. 

A letter from the California Radio Association repre- 
senting the Southern group was read, and the following 
committee appointed to arrange a joint meeting: Sergeant 
McKee, chairman, Director Winters, Lloyd McKinney, 
Henri Kirby, B. McMurphy, George Burton, W. H. Har- 
rington, M. LeBoeuf, Ray Gada. Motion by Tudhope, 
seconded by Jones, authorizing committee to arrange meet- 
ing. Motion carried. 

Motion by LeBoeuf, seconded by Harrington, to accept 
application of F. I. Deetken as a commercial member. 
Motion carried. 

Ray Gada was appointed to represent the interference 
committee. 

A resolution committee was appointed, consisting of 
Don Wood, honorary chairman; Bogardus, Tudhope, 
Hossack, and Hudson. 

A commercial committee was appointed consisting of 
Brunton, Stancil, Becker, and Deetken. 

The Board of Directors will constitute the frequency 
committee. 

Motion by McKee, seconded by Hudson, to hold April 
meeting in San Bruno. Motion carried. 

(Continued on page 34 ) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



Henry Bogardus, Secretary NCPCOA 



The new secretary of the Northern California Police 
Communication Officers' Association, Henry L. Bogardus, 
is a veteran in radio communications. He is a descendant of 
a pioneer family in these United States, being born in Jer- 
sey City, N. J., December 20, 1894, to Dr. and Mrs. H. J. 
Borgardus, being the eleventh generation of the Bogardus 
family in America, which sprang from Dominie E. Bo- 
gardus, first minister of New Amsterdam, who came to 
New York from Holland in 1631. 

Young Bogardus was educated in the Jersey City public 
schools and graduated from the Electrical Engineering De- 
partment of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

In World War I he served overseas in the radio com- 




Henry Bogardus 

pany of the 104 Field Signal Battalion of the 29th Com- 
bat Division. 

After the war he was senior Federal radio inspector en- 
forcing radio communication laws, from 1909 to 1929. 

Here is a summation of his experiences in the radio field: 

Has held a first-class commercial radio telephone and 
telegraph operator's license continuously since November 
1912. He has been an amateur experimenter and operator, 
originally licensed as "2PY" and at present as 
"W6MAX." Sailed on square rigger with the fishing fleet 
to Alaska and served as radio operator on various lines, 
including the Alaska Steamship Company, Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company, Columbia River Packing Company, 
Dollar Line, American-Hawaiian Company, and for sev- 
eral years with the Tropical Radio Telegraph Company of 
the United Fruit Company. 

Worked a year in RCA Engineering Department as en- 
gineer on development of police and other special receivers. 
One year with Universal Wireless Communication Com- 
pany as engineer in establishing a chain of stations between 
Chicago and New York. Two years with Hearst Radio as 
operator and engineer on radio teletype circuit between 



San Francisco, Chicago and New York, and with portable 
mobile equipment. 

Was for many years active member of the Institute of 
Radio Engineers, contributing to the monthly publication 
of that organization by writing article on pioneering work 
in accurate radio frequency measurement work, based on 
comparison of signal with standard calibrated crystal 
standard. 

Filled in spare time and gaps with radio amateur acti- 
vities, writing articles on radio for a newspaper syndicate, 
experimenting and radio repairing, teaching various radio 
schools and attending various radio schools and courses. 
Immediately after the Armistice of World War I attended 
radio course at Sorbonne University in Paris, France, the 
laboratory work for which was done under the shadow of 
the Eifel Tower in the laboratory of General Ferrier, then 
head of the French Signal Corps. 

Secretary Bogardus joined the San Francisco Depart- 
ment of Electricity in May 1939 and since that time has 
kept the radio system going in the Police and Fire De- 
partments. In September 1941 he was placed in operation 
of the first two-way system for San Francisco using the 
latest type frequency modulation equipment which has 
since been considerably expanded. 



SERGEANT E. J. MOODY OF S.F.P.D. 
GOES TO TRAFFIC COLLEGE 

Sergeant Edward J. Moody of the San Francisco Traffic 
Bureau is back in Evanston, 111., taking a four-months' 
course in traffic police administration in the Northwestern 
Traffic Institute. This course, sponsored by the Kemper 
Foundation for Traffic Police Training, draws from police 
departments throughout the United States young officers 
who have displayed especial aptitude for their work of 
traffic law enforcement. 

The last representative from the Police Department of 
this city was Lieutenant James Quigley. 

Sergeant Moody wins with his fellowship $600 to defray 
expenses during his third-year absence. 

In acknowledging the selection and giving his consent 
to a leave of absence for the Sergeant, Chief Charles Dul- 
lea said the San Francisco Police Department would make 
good use of the training Moody would get in Evanston. 

Of the 21 police officers of the nation completing the 
four-month course at the Northwestern University Traffic 
Institute ending on January 22, were three graduates 
whose homes are in California. They are Lieutenant Neal 
F. Plunkett of Oakland, Patrolman Melvin A. Hornbeck 
of San Jose, and Traffic Investigator Karl D. Sprague of 
San Diego. 



BACK THE ATTACK — BUY 
MORE WAR BONDS 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



Chief Burke of San Mateo Dies 



Peace officers of California, and particularly around the 
Bay counties, were shocked January 29th to learn of the 
sudden death of Chief of Police Thomas F. Burke of San 
Mateo in St. Francis Hospital, following an operation. 

In point of continuous service, Chief Burke was the 
second on the list for long tenure as chief of police in Cali- 
fornia, the first being Chief J. N. Black of San Jose. 

Chief Burke, in April, would have completed 27 years 
as head of the San Mateo Police Department, having been 
appointed April 20, 1917. He, however, had decided not 
to complete his 27th year, as he had appealed for a pension 




Chief Thomas F. Burke 

under the state law and this plea had been granted, to take 
effect March 1. 

During his long service as Chief of Police, he has given 
the ever-growing city of San Mateo an administration that 
kept it as free from crime as any city of comparable size 
in the United States, and he introduced into his depart- 
ment every proven weapon to combat crime, being one of 
the first down the Peninsula to go in for radio, and was 
the first to adopt the two-way system now spreading to 
all up-to-date law enforcement agencies throughout the 
land. 

He was a member of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police; the State Peace Officers' Association of 
California, never having missed a meeting of that organiza- 
tion since its formation; of the Bay Counties' Peace Offi- 
cers' Association, of which he was president four years 
ago; and of the Peninsula Police Officers' Association, of 
which he was one of the founders. 

His department has grown from a membership of three 
to its present strength of 23 highly trained and ex- 
perienced officers. When he was first appointed Chief of 
Police, he also was Chief of the Fire Department, yielding 



that position as San Mateo began to grow and its police 
problems increased. 

Mayor Claude Hirshey paid high tribute to the departed 
Chief, whom he had known for 30 years. City Manager 
Soule likewise highly praised Thomas Burke as a man, a 
citizen, and as an officer of the law. 

Inspector Robert O'Brien, who had been slated to suc- 
ceed Chief Burke on March 1, and was appointed by the 
latter as Acting Chief as he left for the hospital, was 
deeply grieved by the passing of his superior officer and 
friend. 

Chief Burke is survived by his wife, two sons, William 
W. of Stockton and Lieutenant Norman T. of the U. S. 
Army; two sisters, Winifred Burke, a school teacher, and 
Mrs. Katherine Field of San Mateo; and a brother, John J., 
retired mail clerk of San Francisco. 

The departed Chief was born in San Francisco, but his 
parents moved to San Mateo when he was a baby and he 
grew up with our southern sister city and county. He was 
in the railway mail service before being appointed to head 
the San Mateo Police Department. 

The funeral, which was held on February 1, was one of 
the largest ever held in the county, and was attended by 
many officials from surrounding counties. 

We knew Tom Burke; he was our friend. In his loss not 
only San Mateo loses an able servant, but the state loses 
an otustanding peace officer. 



Phone SUtter 7060 



S. BRIZZOLARA DRAYING CO. 

DRAYAGE— FORWARDING 



106 CLAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



HASLETT WAREHOUSE CO. 



240 BATTERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HEGGBLADE-MARGULEAS CO. 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 
SHIPPERS, DISTRIBUTORS. EXPORTERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



E. C. NORTON 



WALLER GARAGE 



Gas - Oil - Auto Repairing and Servicing 
3 70 WALLER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 




£~° PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OP1E L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
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or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 , 



IT WAS A QUIET NEW YEAR'S 
EVE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

The celebration of the passing of the year 1943 and the 
advent of 1944 was the most orderly in the history of the 
city. San Francisco on that date housed over three-quarters 
of a million people, yet a record for proper deportment 
was established on the night of December 31 that ex- 
ceeded any previous event of the kind. 

Automobile accidents were at a minimum, and no 
deaths were recorded for the night, and the number of in- 
jured were less than a normal Saturday night. 

The number of persons arrested for over indulgence in 
intoxicating beverages was likewise below the usual Satur- 
day night round-up, and this was reflected in the fact that 
but a few were taken in custody for driving an automo- 
bile while drunk. 

There were only two robberies throughout the 24-hour 
period and those were strong-arm jobs. 

The credit for the most desirable record was due largely 
to the introduction of a novel manner in policing San 
Francisco on this occasion, by Chief of Police Charles 
Dullea. 

Chief Dullea realized that, with money plentiful, with 
many men of the various armed services converging on San 
Francisco, and with the well-known penchant of our citi- 



zenry to celebrate any and all events without restraint, that 
his Police Department faced a Herculean task. So he 
thought up this idea. He called on the head of the Shore 
Patrol, the Military Police, and the Auxiliary Police. He 
presented to these gentlemen a picture of what he thought 
was in the making for urging the Old Year out. He sug- 
gested that the respective services represented, detail a 
sufficient body of uniformed men to the Hall of Justice 
and that, instead of a pair of regular policemen to patrol 
the city and endeavor to preserve order, four men would 
go forth: a Regular Policeman, an Auxiliary Policeman, 
a Shore Policeman, and a Military Policeman. This idea 
met with the hearty approval of all present, and so on Fri- 
day night, December 3 1 , squads of these agencies went out 
and their presence certainly kept everybody within 
bounds. 

The men were instructed to see that no drunken persons 
were permitted to get into their automobiles and pedes- 
trians under the influence were diplomatically told they 
had better get themselves off the streets. It was a fine 
experiment and worked out most desirable, and Chief 
Dullea received many compliments for the orderly manner 
the merrymakers conducted themselves. 



CLEVELAND POLICE SERGEANT IS 
APPOINTED TO SAFETY DIV. IACP 

Sergeant James J. Basta, for the past nine years a mem- 
ber of the Cleveland police department, has been appointed 
to the field staff of the Safety Division of the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police, Evanston, 111., according to 
an announcement made by Lieutenant Robert E. Raleigh, 
acting director of the Safety Division. Sergeant Basta 
assumed his new duties November 22. 

Appointed August 10, 1934, as a patrolman in the 
Cleveland department, Sergeant Basta had two years of 
duty in the detective bureau, and since 1937 had worked 
in the traffic division. He was promoted to the rank of 
sergeant July 15, 1940. 

Sergeant Basta received, in August, 1941, a $1,200 
fellowship for study of traffic police administration at the 
Northwestern University Traffic Institute in Evanston. He 
was graduated from the nine-month course at the Traffic 
Institute in June, 1942. 



INSPECTOR ANDY FORD GETS 
PROMOTION 

The many friends of District Inspector Andrew J. Ford 
of the California Highway Patrol will rejoice at the pro- 
motion he received the first of the year. Chief E. Raymond 
Cato announced Ford has been made supervising inspector 
in charge of liaison with the Army and Navy, for the area 
extending from Monterey to the Oregon line. Inspector 
Ford has established headquarters at 160 South Van Ness 
Avenue, where he will also have charge of the branch 
patrol headquarters housed at that address. 

Inspector Ford, who began his service with the State 
Patrol in Oakland in 1925, has for the past ten years been 
district inspector for San Mateo and San Mateo County. 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Old Police Commissioners In Farewell Letter 

To Department 



With Mayor Roger Lapham taking over the duties of 
chief executive of the city and county of San Francisco, 
Police Commissioners William P. Wobber and Ward G. 
Walkup tendered their resignations. Commissioner 
Walter McGovern had forwarded his several days earlier. 
In taking their departure from their official positions, 
which for nearly four years they have served with dis- 
tinction, and fathered many notable improvements in 
police administration, the first two commissioners ad- 
dressed the following letter to the members of the San 
Francisco Police Department: 

"To the Members of the San Francisco Police Department : 

"We have served the people of the City and County of 
San Francisco in the capacity of Police Commissioners for 
almost four years, and as we are severing our official con- 
nections with the Department, we feel that it is fitting 
and proper that we should convey our respects to you. 

"On Thursday, January 13, 1944, we tendered our 
resignations to Mayor Roger D. Lapham. The resignations 
were accepted. 

"During our incumbency, San Francisco became a com- 
bat area and a target zone, because of the treacherous Pearl 
Harbor attack. 

"Problems arose because of war conditions. Our popula- 
tion increased by thousands and the civilian protection of 
our city necessitated new and additional defenses and or- 
ganizations. While the new conditions imposed new duties 
upon all departments of our city government, it is safe to 
say that the major part of the new and additional respon- 
sibilities rested with the Police Department. 

"In sincere tribute to the men of the Police Department, 
we desire to say that, under the able leadership of Chief 
Charles W. Dullea, every problem was successfully met 
and the rights of our citizens were safeguarded with that 
degree of security and efficiency which has brought forth 
commendation from responsible executives of our city, 
state, and nation. 

"Such a high degree of security could be made possible 
only by the cooperation and hard work of our police offi- 
cers, and we feel that it is but fair and just that, upon our 
separation from the Department, we convey our thanks 
to them. 

"We know that the destiny of our great city will always 
be safe in the hands of San Francisco's Police Department, 
and we ask you to give the same loyal cooperation to our 
new Police Commissioners as has been given us. 

"San Francisco is the city that we all love and the pro- 
tection of her citizens is the first consideration of all, 
whether in or out of public office. 



"With best wishes to you and your families, we remain, 
"(Signed) Very sincerely yours, 

William P. Wobber, 
Ward G. Walkup" 
As a fitting tribute to the services of the retiring board 
of Police Commissions, the new board has voted each an 
honorary gold seven-pointed star, which each will treasure 
throughout his life. 

Phone South S. F. 

SO. SAN FRANCISCO LIQUOR STORE 

3 79 GRAND AVENUE SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone So. S. F. 3100 

SO. SAN FRANCISCO HOSPITAL 



500 GRAND AVENUE 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone: Fruit Dept. So. S. F. 353 Meat Dept. So. S. F. 2 I I 

SO. SAN FRANCISCO FRUIT MARKET 

Paul Susa Ac Bro. - We Aim to Please You 

Vegetables - Groceries - Meats 

363 GRAND AVENUE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



GRAND CREAMERY 



3 15 GRAND AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone So. S. F. 100 



James Panos, Proprietor 

South City Laundry and Linen Supply Co. 

100 Per Cent Union Labor - Mending and Darning Free - Delivery 



1 12 GRAND AVENUE 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone So. S. F. 478-9 



GUERIN BROS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



208 SO. LINDEN AVE. 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone San Bruno 53 



820 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



Frank Jordan 

SUNM ASTER 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 

ROOMS - BOARD 

Reasonable Prices - Good Food 

701 BAYSHORE HIGHWAY SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VAlencia 7460 



Compliments of 

D. E. BURGESS COMPANY 



2198 OAKDALE AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 03 78 

WILLIAMS-WALLACE CO. 

160 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone VAlencia 884 7 Frank DeValle, Mgr. 

SPEEDWAY CAFE 

Cocktails - Italian Dinners - Fine Wines and Liquors 
98 BAYSHORE BLVD. SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



ARE HOPEFUL PEOPLE INSANE? 

(Continued from page 10) 

the government he had given the address of a friend. That 
friend was very obliging and told Inspectors Savasta and 
Shea where to find his good pal Mr. Summers. Very sim- 
ple — his pet jinx had won. When the Oakland Police De- 
partment has finished with our cagey Mr. Summers, the 
authorities up at Folsom will gladly receive him. 

Moral: Beware of Lady Hope — and her sisters Lady 
Chance and Lady Luck. All three of them are scouts for 
the penitentiaries. 



Phone Richmond 5472 



EVELYN'S 



COATS, SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
927 MACDONALD AVE. 402 TENTH ST., Carquinez Hotel Bldg. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 
TODAY: WARCRAFT FOR THE ARMY . . . 

HUNT MARINE SERVICE 

. . . TOMORROW: A BETTER BOAT FOR YOU 



FOR BANK LOANS LAWRENCE SYSTEM AGAINST INVENTORY p Q BOX 96 



RICHMOND, CALIF. 



LAWRENCE WAREHOUSE CO. 



FIELD WAREHOUSING 



3 7 DRUMM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 



Phone Richmond 505 



TRADEWAY 

FURNITURE - "THINGS FOR THE HOME" 



1230 SAN PABLO AVENUE 



EL CERR1TO, CALIF. 



M. REBIZZO 8t CO. 



BUY MORE WAR BONDS 



414 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DO YOU WANT TO EARN #5 IN WAR STAMPS?— SEE CAPTION BELOW 




THESE POLICE OFFICERS KNEW THE BARBARY COAST THAT WAS 

This picture was taken in the early years of this century. We know the names of some of the officers. The Police and Peace 
Ojjicers' journal offers a prize of $5" worth of War Stamps for the proper naming of the policemen shown here. Replies must be 
received by March 1?, 1944. and the person submitting the first correct list of names will be the winner. Replies received at 465 
Tenth Street. San Francisco. 



Febr 



1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



RUN-AWAY CARS IN SAN 
FRANCISCO 

By Judge Herbert Kaufman 

By reason of its many hills, San Francisco has a serious 
traffic safety problem in the numbers of run-away cars. 
At least two autos run away on its hills daily, killing or 
injuring people and damaging property. 

To combat this serious situation, a law was passed some 
years ago providing that the wheels of an auto must be 
angled into and against the curb, in addition to securely 
setting the brakes. 

If motorists would only obey this simply rule, our run- 
away car problem would be instantly solved. 

For years the San Francisco Police Department and our 
Traffic Judges have carried on a campaign to educate the 




Judge Herbert Kaufman 

public to properly park cars on a grade. Stories of little 
children crushed to death playing on their own front lawns 
and of adults being jammed against buildings by run- 
away cars are almost every-day items in our daily press. 

Runaway cars are silent messengers of death. Death 
and destruction must not coast down our hills. Won't you 
please save a life or prevent an injury by toeing in the 
wheels of your car against the curb on any perceptible 
grade? 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

PRESIDENT FOLLIES THEATER 



60 McAllister street 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone HEmlock 6774 

WILLIAM J. FORSTER SONS, LTD. 

PLUMBING 



340 HARRIET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS 

E. J. Willig Truck Transportation Co. 



565 BERRY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



The Fourth 

WAR LOAN 



The Fourth War Loan Drive is 
on. We need more money. By 
"We," our government means you 
and me — every man and woman 
who is an American either by birth 
or adoption. 

We need more ships, more tanks, 
more planes, and more of all the 
other things that make war. Only 
our money can produce them. The 
Fourth War Loan Drive calls for 
14 billion dollars to be raised be- 
tween January 18 and February 
15. A lot of money? An earlier 
victory and peace are cheap at any 
price. Let's raise it quickly. 

Since our boys need the things 
that this War Loan Drive will buy, 
let's see that they get them. They 
are giving much more than money. 
They offer their lives. The very 
least we can do to help is to buy 
bonds. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californiatu- 

LET'S ALL BACK THE ATTACK- 
BUY EXTRA WAR BONDS NOW 

P J X • 244 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1944 



Try Your Hand At This List 

True and False Questions Taken From Captains and Lieutenants Examination of 1942 



(Continued from Last Issue) 



198. 



199. 



200 



202 



203. 



No person other than manufacturers of acids shall 
store or keep in any building more than one carboy 
of nitric, muriate or sulphuric acid, unless the same 
be stored or kept in a fireproof acid room. 
All permits for storing crude petroleum for fuel in 
any part of the city are issued by the Chief of Police. 
The manufacture, transportation, storage, sale or use 
of liquefied acetylene is prohibited within the limits 
of the City and County. 

201. It is unlawful for any person to sit in an aisle in the 
auditorium or gallery of any theater during a per- 
formance. 

The owner, manager or person having control or 
management of any theater, hall, concert hall, or 
other place of public assemblage, must notify the 
Chief of Police at least six hours before the same 
shall be opened for the purpose of public assemblage 
therein. 

It is unlawful for any person other than the Coroner 
to perform an autopsy or other post-mortem examin- 
ation upon the bodies of persons found under such 
circumstances as to lead to a suspicion of crime 
having been committed. 

Every person using embalming material in or upon 
the body of any deceased person after having ob- 
tained a certificate or permit therein required, shall 
make and keep a record of the use of such material. 
It shall be the duty of every attending physician to 
give the certificate of death required by law within 
two hours of death. 

206. No person is legally entitled to drive a motor vehicle 
in California unless he possesses an operator's 
license. 

No U-turn is allowed in the business district. 
It is a felony for a person whose driver's license has 
been revoked to drive an automobile. 
It it a felony for a person to drive a motor vehicle 
while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. 
Any person who drives a vehicle in a reckless man- 
ner is guilty of a felony. 

Whenever any roadway has been divided into three 
or more lanes, a vehicle shall be driven as nearly as 
practical within a single lane. 

It is permissable to pass a vehicle on the right upon 
any city street with unobstructed pavement of suf- 
ficient width for two or more lines of vehicles in 
each direction. 

213. Pedestrians usually have the right of way over vehi- 
cles at uncontrolled intersections. 

214. When a driver intends to turn either right or left he 
is required to give the appropriate signal continu- 
ously during the last 50 yards before turning. 



204. 



205. 



207. 
208. 

209. 

210. 

211. 



212. 



215. When two vehicles enter an intersection from dif- 
ferent highways at the same time, the driver of the 
vehicle on the left shall yield the right of way to the 
driver of the vehicle on the right. 

216. Under no circumstances shall the driver of a motor 
vehicle pass a street car on the left. 

2 1 7. No vehicle shall at any time be driven through or 
within a safety zone. 

218. An unsigned parking tag should state the law vio- 

Phone 525 J. LEIR JOHN F. DUNN 

SAN BRUNO CUT RATE 

TOBACCOS - WINES - LIQUORS 
542 SAN MATEO AVENUE SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Phone UNderhill 0285 



Ralph Mariani 



Peter Pialorsi 



GOLDEN GATE POULTRY CO. 



Live and Dressed Poultry and Eggs 

WHOLESALE 



2254 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 9350 



Open 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 



HENRY'S FASHION RESTAURANT 



Fish and Game a Specialty 



2 70 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

BEER DRIVERS UNION 

LOCAL 227 



Phone PRospect 9968 



"Red" Ferrari 



"Ike" lcardo 



CLUB VAGABOND 

DISTINCTIVE ENTERTAINMENT 



839 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ORdway 5866 

F. ALIOTO FISH CO. 

Producers - Wholesalers 
FOOT OF LEAVENWORTH - P. O. BOX 2195 SAN FRANCISCO 

BUY WAR BONDS and STAMPS 



Phone SUtter 9882 



At Your Service 



A. Urrea J. C. Romo 



TIJUANA CANTINA 

The Right Place to Meet Your Friends - Best Wines and Liquors 

Prompt and Courteous Service 
671 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 9843 



The Original Fly Trap - Established 1890 



LOUIS' FASHION RESTAURANT 

Enjoy Traditionally Good Food Where Granddad Used to Enjoy It 

526 MARKET STREET, at SANSOME SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone PRospect 1133 For a Happy, Care-free Evening 

Compliments of 

THE ARISTOCRAT 



For Your Favorite Drinks 
298 TURK STREET, cor. Leavenworth 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 9295 

SINGLETON'S 301 CLUB 

"The Club with the Friendly Atmosphere" 
301 VALENCIA STREET, at I4TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



February, 1944 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



lated, the approximate time thereof, and the location 
where such violation occurred, and fix a time and 
place for appearance by the registered owner in 
answer to said notice. 

219. When an auto is tagged in the absence of the regis- 
tered owner, the notice must be affixed in the left- 
hand corner of the windshield. 

220. A